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Bulletin of 

Wake Forest 
College 

and the School of 
Business and 
Accountancy 

The Undergraduate Schools 
of Wake Forest University 










WAKE FOREST 



UNIVERSITY 



1984-1985 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwakefo19841985 



ew Series April 1984 Volume 79, Number 3 







Bulletin of 

Wake Forest 
College 

and the School of 
Business and 
Accountancy 

The Undergraduate Schools 
of Wake Forest University 

Announcements for 

1984-1985 

Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually in February, March, April, May, June, July, and August by the 

University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

USPS 078-320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27105 



The Academic Calendar 



Fall Semester 1984 



August 24 

August 24-28 

August 26 



Friday 



Friday- 
Tuesday 
Sunday 



Sunday 



Residence halls open at 8 a.m. for first ye 

students 
Orientation for first year students 

Residence halls open at 10 a.m. for transi' 
students and at noon for returnii 
students 

Orientation for transfer students beginnii 
at 2 p.m. 



August 


27, 28 


Monday, 
Tuesday 


Registration for all courses 


August 


29 


Wednesday 


Classes begin 


September 


4 


Tuesday 


Opening Convocation 


September 


11 


Tuesday 


Last day to add courses 


September 


25 


Tuesday 


Last day to drop courses 


October 


19 


Friday 


Fall holiday— midterm grades due 


November 


22-25 


Thursday- 
Sunday 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 


26 


Monday 


Classes resume 


December 


7 


Friday 


Classes end 


December 


10-12 


Monday- 
Wednesday 


Examinations 


December 


13 


Thursday 


Reading day 


December 


17, 18 


Monday, 
Tuesday 


Examinations 


December 


19- 


Wednesday- 


Christmas recess 


January 


13 


Sunday 





1984 



JANUARY 




S M T W T F 


S 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 30 31 





MAY 




S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 







SEPTEMBER 




S 


M T W T F 


S 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 









FEBRUARY 




S 


M 


T 


W 
1 


T 
2 


F 

3 


S 

4 


5 


6 


7 


e 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2C 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 













JUNE 




S 


M 


T W T 


F S 
1 2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 





OCTOBER 


S 


M T W T F S 




12 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 30 31 







MARCH 






S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 
2 


S 
3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 







JULY 






S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 













NOVEMBER 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 2 3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 





APRIL 




S M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 7 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 14 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 28 


29 30 







AUGUST 
S M T W T F 
1 2 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S 
4 
11 

18 
25 




DECEMBER 
S M T W T F 

2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 
16 17 18 19 20 21 
23 24 25 26 27 28 
30 31 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 
I 







Spring Semester 1985 



January 


13 


Sunday 


Residence halls open at noc 


January 


14, 15 


Monday, 
Tuesday 


Registration for all courses 


January 


16 


Wednesday 


Classes begin 


January 


29 


Tuesday 


Last day to add courses 


February 


7 


Thursday 


Founders' Day Convocation 


February 


12 


Tuesday 


Last day to drop courses 


March 


8 


Friday 


Midterm grades due 


March 


9-17 


Saturday- 
Sunday 


Spring recess 


March 


18 


Monday 


Classes resume 


May 


3 


Friday 


Classes end 


May 


6-8 


Monday- 
Wednesday 


Examinations 


May 


9 


Thursday 


Reading day 


May 


10, 11 


Friday, 
Saturday 


Examinations 


May 


13, 14 


Monday, 
Tuesday 


Examinations 


May 


19 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate 


May 


20 


Monday 


Commencement 



JANUARY 




S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 





MAY 




S M T W T F 


S 


1 2 3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 





SEPTEMBER 




S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 30 





1985 





FEBRUARY 




s 


M T W T F 
1 


S 

? 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 ' 





JUNE 




S M T W T F 


S 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 





OCTOBER 




S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 







MARCH 




S M 


T W T 


F S 
1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


31 









JULY 




S 


M T W T 


F S 




12 3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 27 


28 


29 30 31 







NOVEMBER 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 2 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 





APRIL 




S 


M T W T 


F S 




12 3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 27 


28 


29 30 







AUGUST 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 2 3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 





DECEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 











The Bulletin 



The Academic Calendar 2 

The University 8 

Buildings and Grounds 9 

Libraries 10 

Computer Center 11 

Recognition and Accreditation 11 

The Undergraduate Schools 13 

Wake Forest College 14 

Statement of Purpose 14 

History and Development 15 

Student Life 22 

Student Government 22 

College Union 23 

Women's Residence Council 24 

Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils 24 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 24 

Academic Awards 25 

Intramural Athletics 25 

Intercollegiate Athletics 26 

Religious Activities 26 

Cultural Activities 27 

Educational Planning and Placement 28 

University Counseling Center 28 

Student Health Service 28 

Procedures 29 

Admission 29 

Application 29 

Early Decision 30 

Admission of Handicapped Students 30 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 30 

Admission of Transfer Students 31 

Expenses 31 

Tuition 32 

Room Charges 32 

Food Services 32 

Other Charges 32 

Refunds 33 

Housing 34 

Academic Calendar 34 

Orientation and Advising 34 

Registration 35 

Classification 35 

Class Attendance 35 

Auditing Classes 36 

Dropping a Course 36 



Withdrawal from the College 36 

Examinations 37 

Grading 37 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 38 

Dean's List 38 

Graduation Distinctions 38 

Repetition of Courses 38 

Probation 38 

Requirements for Continuation 39 

Requirements for Readmission 40 

Senior Conditions 40 

Summer Study 40 

Transfer Credit 40 

Scholarships and Loans 41 

< Scholarships 41 

1 Federal Financial Aid Programs 46 

'i Exchange Scholarships 48 

• Loans 49 

< Concessions 50 

I Other Financial Aid 50 

Special Programs 51 

< Honors Study 51 

Open Curriculum 51 

I Residential Language Centers 51 

f Foreign Area Studies 51 

'< Study at Salem College 52 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 52 

London 52 

Venice 52 

France 52 

Spain 52 

India 53 

Independent Study 53 

Requirements for Degrees 54 

Degrees Offered 54 

General Requirements 54 

Basic Requirements 55 

Divisional Requirements 55 

Requirement in Physical Education 56 

Proficiency in the Use of English 56 

Basic and Divisional Requirements 56 

Declaring a Major 57 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 57 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 58 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 58 

Minors 58 

Interdisciplinary Minors 58 



V 



Foreign Area Studies 59 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 61 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 61 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 62 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 62 

Degrees in Microbiology 63 

Degrees in Dentistry 63 

Degrees in Engineering 63 

Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 64 

Courses of Instruction 65 

Anthropology 65 

Art 69 

Asian Studies 73 

Biology 74 

Chemistry 78 

Classical Languages 80 

Economics 84 

Education 87 

English 93 

German 98 

History 100 

Humanities 104 

Interdisciplinary Honors 106 

Mathematics and Computer Science 108 

Military Science 112 

Music 113 

Philosophy 120 

Physical Education 123 

Physics 127 

Politics 129 

Psychology 134 

Religion 138 

Romance Languages 143 

Sociology 153 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 157 

School of Business and Accountancy 164 

Degrees Conferred 170 

Honor Societies 180 

Enrollment 182 

The Board of Trustees 185 

The Board of Visitors 186 

The Administration 188 

The Undergraduate Faculties 195 

Emeriti 210 

The Committees of the Faculty 212 

Index 217 



: 



The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal learning an<j 
professional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community an< 
fellowship, and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression. 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the schoc 
opened its doors on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel Wait a 
principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on th 
plantation of Calvin Jones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later developed 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institution i 
of higher learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for mei 
until 1894, when the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine 
founded in 1902, offered a two-year medical program until 1941. In that year th 
School was moved from the Town of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, becam 
associated with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and was renamed the Bowmai 
Gray School of Medicine in honor of the benefactor who made possible the mov 
and expansion to a full four-year program. In 1942 Wake Forest admitted womei 
as regular undergraduate students. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over tw< 
decades offered an undergraduate program of study in business. In 1969 th 
undergraduate school was succeeded by the Department of Business an< 
Accountancy and the Department of Economics in Wake Forest College; at the sam 
time the Babcock Graduate School of Management was established. In 1980 th 
undergraduate program in business and accountancy was reconstituted as th' 
undergraduate School of Business and Accountancy. The Division of Graduat 
Studies was established in 1961. It is now organized as the Graduate School am 
encompasses advanced work in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda ant 
Hawthorne campuses in Winston-Salem. The summer session was inaugurated ii 
1921. 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention o 
North Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate 
the non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School o 
Medicine was already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, th 
late Mary Reynolds Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds wen 
received from many sources. Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen building 
were erected in Georgian style on the new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 th 
College moved all operations, leaving the 122-year old campus in the Town of Waki 
Forest to the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 it 
augmented character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Fores 
University. Today, enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4,500 
Governance remains in the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development fo 
each of the six schools of the University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for th< 
undergraduate schools and Graduate School, the School of Law, the Graduate Schoo 
of Management, and the School of Medicine. A joint board of University Trustee: 



nd Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital is responsible for the Medical 
enter, which includes the hospital and the School of Medicine. Alumni and parents' 
rganizations are also active at Wake Forest, and support by the Z. Smith Reynolds 
oundation and other foundations and corporations is strong and continuing. 
Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part 
f the school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution 
lat would provide education under Christian influences. The basis for the 
ontinuing relationship between the University and the Convention is a mutually 
greed-upon covenant which expresses the Convention's deep interest in Christian 
igher education and the University's desire to serve the denomination as one of 
:s constituencies. Wake Forest receives financial and intangible support from 
Convention-affiliated churches. 

[ The College, School of Business and Accountancy, Graduate School, School of 

^aw, and Graduate School of Management are located on the Reynolda Campus 

\ northwest Winston-Salem. The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is about four 

hiles away, near the city's downtown on what is known as the Hawthorne Campus. 

he University also offers instruction regularly at Casa Artom in Venice, at Worrell 

louse in London, and in other places around the world. 

The College offers courses in more than forty fields of study leading to the 

accalaureate degree. The School of Business and Accountancy offers courses of 

tudy leading to the baccalaureate in business and accountancy. The School of Law 

ffers the Juris Doctor and the Graduate School of Management, the Master of 

business Administration. In addition to the Doctor of Medicine degree, the School 

t f Medicine offers through the Graduate School programs leading to the Master 

M Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the basic medical sciences. The 

Graduate School confers the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, and Master 

f Science degrees in the arts and sciences and the Doctor of Philosophy degree 

i biology and chemistry. 

J Buildings and Grounds 

The Reynolda Campus of Wake Forest is situated on approximately 320 acres; its 

physical plant consists of over thirty buildings, most of which are of modified 

L Georgian architecture and constructed of Old Virginia brick trimmed in granite and 

. imestone. The Reynolda Gardens annex, consisting of about 150 acres and including 

teynolda Woods, Reynolda Village, and Reynolda Gardens, is adjacent to the 

ampus. The Graylyn Estate, an educational conference center, is nearby. 

Lovette House, a block from campus at the intersection of Reynolda and Polo Roads, 

3 a residential center for students of French, Italian, and Spanish. Students of 

German may choose to live in The Red Farm House on campus. 

Wait Chapel is named in memory of the first president of the College. Its main 

uditorium seats 2,300 and is also the home of the Wake Forest Baptist Church. 

Tie Wait Chapel tower contains the Janet Jeffrey Carlile Harris Carillon, an 

istrument of forty-eight bells. Wingate Hall, named in honor of President Washington 

/lanly Wingate, houses the Department of Religion, the offices of the University 

Chaplaincy and the Wake Forest Baptist Church, and other classrooms and offices. 



10 



Reynolda Hall, across the upper plaza from Wait Chapel, is an administration 
building and student center. Most administrative offices for the Reynolda Campus 
are there, along with the College Union, other student activities, and the computer 
center. The Z. Smith Reynolds Library houses the main collection of books and 
documents on the Reynolda Campus. Along with eight floors of open stacks, having 
a capacity for about 1,000,000 volumes, it has reading and reference rooms for study 
and some academic offices. The Department of Economics is also in the library. 

Winston Hall houses biology and psychology; Salem Hall, the chemistry and physics 
departments. Both buildings have laboratories as well as classrooms and special 
research facilities. Harold W. Tribble Hall accomodates the humanities and social 
science departments and has a curriculum materials center, an honors seminar room, 
a philosophy library and seminar room, and a larger lecture area, DeTamble 
Auditorium, with an adjacent exhibition gallery. Instruction in business, accountan- 
cy, and mathematics is carried out in Charles H. Babcock Hall, which also houses 
the Babcock Graduate School of Management. The School of Law occupies Guy 
T. Carswell Hall. 

The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center is of contemporary design appropriate to the 
functions of studio art, theatre, musical performances, and instruction in art history, 
drama, and music. Off its lobby is a large gallery for special exhibitions. In the art 
wing are spacious studios for drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking, along 
with a smaller gallery and classrooms. In the theatre wing are design and production 
areas and two technically complete theatres, the larger of traditional proscenium 
design and the smaller for experimental ring productions. The music wing contains 
Brendle Hall for concerts and lectures, classrooms, practice rooms for individuals 
and groups, and the offices of the music department. 

The William N. Reynolds Gymnasium has classrooms for instruction in physical 
education, courts for indoor sports, a swimming pool, and offices for the Department 
of Physical Education and for military science. Adjacent are tennis courts, sports 
fields, a track, an Indoor Tennis Center, and the Athletic Center for intercollegiate 
athletics. 

There are seven residence halls for undergraduate men: Kitchin House, Poteat House, 
Davis House, Taylor House, Huffman Hall, Palmer Dormitory, and Piccolo Dormitory. 
For women there are five residence halls: Bostwick, Johnson, Babcock, New Dormitory, 
and Efird Hall. Just off the main campus are apartment buildings for faculty and 
married students, and there is a town house apartment building on campus. 



Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate 
education and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An 
endowment provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock 
Foundation and another from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained 
expansion and development of library resources, especially to support the graduate 
program. The libraries of the University hold membership in the Association of 
Southeastern Research Libraries. 



11 



The library collections total 849,987 volumes. Of these, 649,090 consitute the general 
collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, 88,655 are housed in the School of Law, 
98,884 in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 13,358 in a 
relatively new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions 
to 11,634 periodicals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the 
four libraries of the University. The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also 
include 25,687 reels of microfilm, 281,566 pieces of microcards, microprint, and 
microfiche, and 78,581 volumes of United States government publications. 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, and include pertinent critical material. Among 
the special collections are a Mark Twain collection, a Gertrude Stein collection, and 
the Ethel Taylor Crittenden collection in Baptist history. The acquisition of the Charles 
H. Babcock Collection of Rare and Fine Books represents an important addition 
to the resources of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. 

The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research 
methods, assistance in independent and directed studies, and bibliographic 
presentations as requested by faculty. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center supports University instructional, research, and 
administrative needs. There are terminals for student and faculty use in various 
places on campus and the two main terminals for students are in the Computer 
Center in Reynolda Hall and in the Library. The University has two computers. A 
Hewlett Packard 3000 Series 44 system, used by the administration, has two million 
bytes of memory and 524 million bytes of disc storage. The Prime 750, installed in 
February, 1982, is used primarily for instructional and research purposes. It has three 
million bytes of memory and 600 million bytes of disc storage. 

Computer languages available include FORTRAN, FORTRAN77, BASIC, COBOL, 
RPG II, Assembler, Pascal, and PL/1. Statistical packages such as SPSS, BBDP, IDA, 
Minitab, and TSP can be used for data analysis, forecasting, and financial modeling. 

In addition to the facilities at the computer center, a remote batch connection with 
the Triangle Universities Computing Center (TUCC) and its IBM 3081 makes access 
to other statistical packages (notably SAS) possible, and makes the programs 
provided by the North Carolina Educational Computing Services (NCECS) available 
to Wake Forest computer users. Various departments on campus use microcomputers 
for research and teaching. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American 
Colleges, the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States. The University has chapters of the principal national 
social fraternities, professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta 
Kappa and Sigma Xi. The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is a member of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council 



V 



12 



on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. The program in 
counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and j 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral degree 
programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. Accreditation was reaffirmed in 
December 1975. 




The Rare Book Room in Z. Smith Reynolds Library 



13 



The Undergraduate Schools 



There are two undergraduate schools at Wake Forest University, Wake Forest 
College and the School of Business and Accountancy. The undergraduate schools 
are governed by the Board of Trustees and by their respective faculties and 
administration. Responsibility for academic administration is delegated by the 
president and trustees to the provost, who is chief academic officer of the University. 
The deans of the schools are responsible for academic planning and administration 
for their schools. Collaborating with the dean of Wake Forest College are associate 
and assistant deans and the vice president and assistant vice president for 
administration and planning, who coordinate student services. Other officers in 
the area of student services are the dean of students, who directs residential, social, 
and cultural life with the assistance of a professional staff; and the directors of the 
University Health Service and the University Counseling Center. A list of 
administrative offices is found in this bulletin beginning on page 188. In many 
administrative areas responsibility is shared, or advice is given by the faculty 
committees listed in this bulletin beginning on page 212. 




President Thomas K. Hearn Jr. 



14 

Wake Forest College 

Wake Forest College is the undergraduate school of arts and sciences of Wake Fores) 
University. It is the center of the University's academic life; through it the University 
carries on the tradition of preparing men and women for personal enrichment, 
enlightened citizenship, and professional life. 

Wake Forest College is a place of meeting. Its teachers and students are of diverse 
backgrounds and interests, and that diversity is crucial to the distinctive charactei 
of the College. Wake Forest continually examines its educational purpose anc 
evaluates its success in fulfilling it. A formal statement of purpose was preparec 
as part of the school's decennial reaccreditation process and was adopted by the 
Board of Trustees. 



Statement of Purpose 

The people who wrote the Statement of Purpose were guided by the history o: 
Wake Forest, particularly the history of its expressed and implied objectives. Thei] 
goal was to articulate the attributes which make Wake Forest distinctive. 

"We believe," they said, "that Wake Forest should be as good an academy a; 
possible. We believe that diversity should exist in the faculty, staff, and student bod) 
and that such diversity is necessary as Wake Forest seeks to meet its educationa 
responsibilities, and as a guide to those who must make the decisions which wil 
determine the school's character in the future." 

Following is the official statement of purpose of Wake Forest College. 

Wake Forest is a university entrusted with a vital religious heritage and 
an equally vital tradition of academic freedom. Recognizing the special 
character of its obligation as an educational institution, Wake Forest assumes 
the responsibility of insuring that the Christian faith will be an integral 
part of the University common life. The University maintains its historic 
religious perspective through an association with the Baptist churches of 
North Carolina, the visible symbol and the ministry of the campus church, 
the chaplaincy, and the Christian commitment of individuals within the 
faculty and the administration. At Wake Forest, those who represent this 
perspective engage in a continuing dialogue with those of other views who 
join with them in dedication to teaching and learning. Together they assume 
responsibility for the integrity of the institution and for its commitment 
to academic excellence. 

In keeping with its belief in the value of community, Wake Forest also 
recognizes an obligation to preserve its atmosphere of mutual respect and 
of openness to diverse interests and concerns. Its religious heritage, which 
continues to find expression in tradition, ritual, and convocation, provides 
unifying and sustaining values beneficial to the whole community. Because 
of its heritage, Wake Forest fosters honesty and good will, and it encourages 



15 



the various academic disciplines to relate their particular subjects to the 
fundamental questions which pertain to all human endeavor. 

Along with the value of community, Wake Forest respects the value of 
the individual, which it expresses through its concern for the education 
of the whole person. In view of this concern, a basic curriculum composed 
of the liberal arts and sciences is essential to the objectives of the College. 
This means that though the usefulness of professional and technical courses 
is acknowledged, it is necessary that such courses be related to a 
comprehensive program of humanistic and scientific studies. In particular, 
this objective requires an acceptable level of proficiency in those linguistic 
and mathematical skills which are basic to other pursuits. It also calls for 
a study of the major contributions from one or more representative areas 
within the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, in- 
cluding an examination of integrating disciplines such as religion, 
philosophy, and history. Such a course of study, when made an essential 
part of the total offering, prevents the premature specialization which 
threatens effective communication among the disciplines, and it addresses 
the fundamental as well as the vocational needs of the student. Wake Forest 
expects that all of the courses in its curriculum will make significant 
demands upon the talents of the student and will encourage the develop- 
ment of a humane dispostition and an inquiring spirit. 

History and Development 

Since 1834 Wake Forest College has persevered— sometimes barely— through wars, 
!Conomic crises, and controversy. In spite of these difficulties, perhaps because of 
hem, the College has developed its distinctive pattern of characteristics: tenacity, 
independence, a fierce defense of free inquiry and expression, and a concern that 
-nowledge be used responsibly and compassionately. 

That these qualities have often been passed along to Wake Forest's students is 
evident in the lives many have led. That these characteristics have served the school 
veil is displayed by its growth from a small sectarian school to one of the nation's 
iignificant small private universities. 

A brief history of Wake Forest is useful in understanding the University as it is 
oday and appreciating the process through which it developed. 

The founding of Wake Forest College in 1834 was one manifestation of the 
ntellectual and humanitarian reform movement in North Carolina and the nation 
luring the 1830s. The beginnings of the College and the formation of the Baptist 
jtate Convention of North Carolina were closely interwoven: a leading motive for 
he organization of the Convention was that it serve as an agency for establishing 
in institution that would provide education under Christian influences. 

The leaders in the movement for Convention and College were ministers and 
aymen from diverse backgrounds: Martin Ross, a North Carolinian; Thomas 
Meredith, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; and Samuel Wait, a graduate 
)f Columbian College in Washington, DC. The inspiration of Ross, the scholarship 
)f Meredith, and the leadership of Wait combined to lead the Baptists of North 



V 



16 



Carolina into the formation of the Baptist State Convention on March 26, 1830. Wait 
was appointed as the Convention's agent to explain to churches, associations, and 
others the need for a college to provide "an education in the liberal arts in fields 
requisite for gentlemen." 

For nearly three years Wait traveled over the state in his wagon, speaking to a 
large number of the approximately 15,000 Baptists who lived in the Piedmont and 
coastal counties. Perhaps as many as one-half opposed missions, education, and 
other benevolences, but after two years of educational canvassing Wait reported 
enough sentiment in favor of the program of the Convention to proceed. 

A 600-acre plantation, located sixteen miles north of Raleigh, was purchased from 
Calvin Jones in 1832 for $2,000, and the North Carolina Legislature was asked to 
grant a charter for a literary institution based on the manual labor principle. The 
lobbying of opponents, both Baptist and non-Baptist, was effective; only the tie- 
breaking vote of William D. Moseley, speaker of the Senate and a graduate of the 
University of North Carolina, secured passage of the charter-granting bill. It was 
a meager charter, subject to various restrictions and limited to a period of twenty 
years, but the birth of Wake Forest had been achieved. Its subsequent growth would 
be the result of creative adjustments and successful responses to a series of other 
challenges. 

After his successful three-year canvass of the state, Samuel Wait was elected 
principal of the new institution. Sixteen students registered on February 3, 1834; 
before the end of the year seventy-two had enrolled. The manual labor principle, 
adopted as a partial means of financing the institution, was abandoned after five 
years, and the school was rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College. 

The economic crisis of 1837 had such an adverse effect that support for the College 
and student enrollment steadily declined; only a loan of $10,000 from the State 
Literary Fund in 1841 prevented bankruptcy. During these years of arduous struggle 
to keep the College alive, President Wait exhausted his physical strength and con- 
tracted an illness which forced him to resign the presidency in 1845. 

William Hooper succeeded Wait, and the prospects of the College became brighter. 
Hooper, a grandson of one of North Carolina's three signers of the Declaration of 
Independence, had received his education at the University of North Carolina. As 
a native North Carolinian with family connections extending over several generations, 
he was able to mobilize public opinion in support of the College. 

After Hooper's resignation the Trustees elected to the presidency Professor of 
Mathematics John B. White, a graduate of Brown University. Since the mortgages 
on the physical facilities had been paid during Hooper's tenure, fund raising efforts 
during President White's administration could be concentrated on increasing the 
College endowment. The Trustees authorized a capital campaign and selected as 
its leader Washington Manly Wingate, an 1849 graduate who within a year and a 
half raised approximately $33,000. 

But the temper of the times was unsuited to leadership by a Northerner, and 
President White resigned in 1854. The Trustees chose as his successor Wingate, then 
twenty-six years old and the first alumnus of the College to serve as president. Under 
his vigorous leadership, which spanned nearly three decades, the quality of students 
improved and new faculty members were added. During the first eight years of 



17 



Wingate's administration, sixty-six students graduated— more than half of the total 
graduated during the first twenty-three years in the life of the College. In 1857 
President Wingate launched a campaign to produce an additional endowment of 
$50,000, over one-half of which was raised in a single evening during the 1857 meeting 
of the Convention. 

This period of growth and expansion was cut short by the division of the nation 
in 1861. The Conscription Act of 1863 did not exempt students, and for three years 
of the Civil War the College suspended operations. The buildings were used briefly 
for a girls' school; after 1863 the Confederate government used College facilities 
as a military hospital. 

Following Sherman's march through the South and Lee's surrender at Appomattox, 
a peace of desolation pervaded the region. Supporters of Wake Forest surveyed what 
remained; College buildings, now leaky and in poor repair; approximately $11,700 
from a pre-war endowment of $100,000; the former president and faculty; a loyal 
group of trustees. There was also something else: an indomitable spirit of 
determination that Wake Forest should emerge from the wreck of the war and fulfill 
its mission. 

The needs of the College were great and financial prospects poor, but in November 
1865, barely six months after the end of the war, nine members of the Board of 
Trustees, acting with unwarranted courage, authorized the resumption of classes. 
Wingate was persuaded to resume the presidency, and on January 15, 1866, fifty- 
one students enrolled. The number increased as the South and its economy slowly 
recovered. 

President Wingate realized that the people of North Carolina had to be awakened 
to the need for education in the renascent south, and that they must be persuaded 
that Wake Forest could help serve that need. To launch this campaign, a Baptist- 
sponsored, statewide educational convention was held in Raleigh, but before funds 
could be collected, the financial crisis of 1873 ended all immediate hope for 
endowment. The failure of the 1873-74 fund raising campaign placed the College 
in a precarious position. The triple encumbrances of war, reconstruction, and 
financial panic made it evident that little money could be raised in North Carolina. 
The Committee on Endowment of the Board of Trustees appointed James S. Purefoy 
a local merchant and Baptist minister, as agent to solicit funds in the Northern states 
for continued operation of the College. While serving as treasurer of the Board before 
the war, he had salvaged $11,700 from the pre-war endowment of $100,000 by 
persuading the Trustees to invest half of the endowment in state bonds. After two 
years of unrelenting and often discouraging labor, without remuneration, he placed 
in the hands of the Trustees the sum of $9,200. 

It was also in the bleak days of financial uncertainty that a Wake Forest student, 
James W Denmark, proposed and founded the first college student loan fund in 
the United States. A Confederate veteran, Denmark had worked six years to 
accumulate enough money for his own college expenses. Soon after entering Wake 
Forest in 1871 he realized that many students had the same great financial need. 
From his meager funds he spent five dollars for post cards and wrote to college 
presidents across the country asking how their loan funds were organized. When 
he found that the colleges had none, he enlisted the support of faculty and students 



18 



at Wake Forest and in 1877 persuaded the Legislature to charter the North Carolina 
Baptist Student Loan Fund. Now known as the James W. Denmark Loan Fund, 
it is the oldest college student loan fund in the United States and has assets of 
$325,000 to serve the needs of students according to the purposes of its founder. 

By the close of President Wingate's second administration in 1879, the College 
had been successfully revived. The endowment had been increased and new 
construction had begun. Perhaps the greatest service President Wingate rendered 
was bringing to the College a faculty of highly qualified scholars who served the 
College with distinction and dedication over many years. Among them were 
Professors William G. Simmons (1855-88), William Royall (1859-70; 1880-92), William 
Bailey Royall (1866-1928), Luther Rice Mills (1867-1907), and Charles Elisha Taylor 
(1870-1915), who served as president from 1884 to 1905. Two other scholars who 
became tutors or adjunct professors in the last year of President Wingate's 
administration were also destined to play important roles in the life of the College. 
Needham Y. Gulley, who established the School of Law in 1894 and served as its 
first dean for thirty-six years, and biologist William Louis Poteat, who served the 
College for fifty years, twenty-two of them as president. 

The administration of President Thomas Henderson Pritchard, which followed 
that of President Wingate, was brief and served principally to further Wingate's efforts 
to persuade Baptists and other North Carolinians to improve the deplorable condition 
of education in the state. The second alumnus of the College to serve as president, 
Pritchard was an eloquent speaker whose prominent leadership among Baptists 
increased the patronage of the College and improved its image among its 
constituency. 

Charles Elisha Taylor, whom President Wingate had brought to the faculty in 1880, 
was elected in 1884 to serve as the sixth president. 

Taylor's administration from 1884 to 1905 brought enrichment of the academic 
program in a variety of ways. Academic departments were increased from eight to 
thirteen, and the size of the faculty more than doubled. Two new schools were 
added: the School of Law in 1894 and the School of Medicine in 1902. Progress 
in other areas included the addition of buildings and the landscaping of the campus. 
Over 400 trees were planted, making Magnolia grandiflora almost synonymous with 
the Wake Forest campus. 

President Taylor was succeeded by William Louis Poteat. Affectionately known 
as "Doctor Billy" to students during and after his twenty-two year administration, 
he continued to promote the general growth of all areas of College life. Special 
emphasis was placed on development in the sciences, reflecting in part the interests 
of the president and in part the need to enrich the pre-medical training required 
by the new School of Medicine. 

As student enrollment increased from 313 in 1905 to 742 in 1927, there was a 
corresponding increase in the size of the faculty. Registration in religion, English, 
education, and the social sciences required more administrative direction, and a 
dean and a registrar were employed along with a library staff. Propelled by the trend 
of the other colleges in the state, Wake Forest also gave more attention to sports 
and achieved an envied reputation in baseball and football. Also notable during 
President Poteat 's administration was the continued growth of the endowment. 



19 



Beyond these significant material advances, President Poteat brought distinction 
in the form of state and national recognition. A devout Christian, an eloquent 
speaker, and an accomplished scholar, he became a national leader in education 
and probably the foremost Baptist layman in the state. As a distinguished scientist 
he was among the first to introduce the theory of evolution to his biology classes. 
The Christian commitment in his personal and public life enabled him to defend 
successfully his views on evolution before the Baptist State Convention in 1922, in 
a major victory for academic freedom that attracted nationwide attention. Through 
his influence and that of Wake Forest alumni who supported his view, the North 
Carolina Legislature refused to follow other Southern states in the passage of 
anti-evolution laws in the 1920s. 

During the administration of Poteat's successor, Francis Pendleton Gaines 
(1927-1930), the academic program continued to improve. In 1930 the Trustees selected 
Thurman D. Kitchin, dean of the medical school, to fill the presidency. Kitchin was 
a member of a family prominent in state and national affairs: one brother, William W 
Kitchin, had served as governor of North Carolina; another, Claude Kitchin, had 
served as majority leader in the United States House of Representatives. Kitchin's 
twenty-year administration was one of progress in the face of many obstacles- 
Depression, destructive campus fires (one of which destroyed venerable Wait Hall), 
the disruption caused by World War II, and a depleted student body. 

Notable accomplishments during this period were the approval in 1936 of the 
School of Law by the American Bar Association and in 1941 the removal of the School 
of Medicine to Winston-Salem, where it undertook full four-year operation in 
association with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital as the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, named after the benefactor whose bequest made expansion possible. 

World War II brought other changes. Although the College was able to remain 
open, enrollment dropped in 1942 to 474. The College met this crisis by modifying 
its century-old admissions policy and becoming a coeducational institution that year. 
In the post-war period, enrollment mushroomed with the return of the veterans 
and reached a peak of 1,762 by 1949. Just before World War II a $7,000,000 capital 
expansion campaign for buildings and endowment had been launched by President 
Kitchin. The war forced the postponement of construction, but out of the campaign 
came a proposal which offered another war-ridden Wake Forest an opportunity for 
yet another rebirth. The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation proposed that up to $350,000 
a year of its income (an amount which has steadily increased over the years) be 
given in perpetuity to the College, provided that the entire College be relocated 
in Winston-Salem and that other friends of the College provide a campus site and 
buildings. In 1946 the Board of Trustees, the Convention, and the Baptist constituency 
of the state accepted the Reynolds proposal. Charles H. Babcock and his wife Mary 
Reynolds Babcock offered a 320-acre tract of their Reynolda estate as a site for the 
new campus. 

To move an institution over 100 years old from its rural setting 110 miles to a new 
campus in an urban area required leadership of great vision, determination, and 
youthful vigor. To succeed President Kitchin, who retired on his sixty-fifth birthday, 
the Trustees in 1950 elected to the presidency Harold Wayland Tribble, then president 
of Andover Newton Theological Seminary and a noted Baptist theologian. President 



20 



Tribble immediately began to mobilize alumni and friends of the College, and the 
Baptist State Convention, in support of the great transition. 

In the spring of 1951, William Neal Reynolds and Nancy Reynolds offered an 
anonymous challenge gift of $2,000,000 on the condition that the College raise 
$3,000,000 by June 30, 1952. The deadline was extended and the challenge met by 
January 1953. Mr. Reynolds died in September 1951 (the Foundation assumed his 
$1,500,000 share of the challenge grant) and he willed Wake Forest $1,000,000, to 
be paid at the time of removal. In recognition of his bequest the new gymnasium 
was named for him. Because of the capital funds received from the Reynolds 
Foundation, the Trustees voted that the library be named the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Library and the administration building Reynolda Hall. 

Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in Winston-Salem on October 15, 1951, 
when a crowd of more than 20,000 watched President Harry Truman lift the first 
shovel of dirt to begin construction of the new Wake Forest campus. Between 1951 
and 1956 fourteen buildings were erected; the removal of the College to its new 
home was accomplished in time for the opening of the summer session in 1956. 

During the next eleven years of President Tribble's administration the College 
experienced many changes. It had revised its curriculum before moving to the new 
campus, offering greater flexibility to students, whose number increased to 3,022. 
The size of the faculty expanded, reducing the student/teacher ratio to 
fourteen-to-one. 

Additional resources came to the College in its new home. In 1954 the will of 
Colonel George Foster Hankins provided over $1,000,000 to be used for scholarships. 
In 1956 the Ford Foundation contributed $680,000 to the endowment of the 
undergraduate program and $1,600,000 to the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 
After the completion of a challenge gift of $3,000,000 offered in 1965, the Foundation 
raised its annual contribution to $620,000. The holdings of the University's libraries 
more than tripled, and the Z. Smith Reynolds Library was awarded the income 
from an endowment fund of $4,500,000 contributed by the Mary Reynolds Babcock 
Foundation and Nancy Reynolds. 

Graduate work, first offered in 1866 but suspended during the removal program, 
was resumed in 1961 with the establishment of the Division of Graduate Studies. 
In 1967, recognizing the augmented resources of the College, the Trustees officially 
changed the institution's name to Wake Forest University. The Division of Graduate 
Studies became the Graduate School and the name Wake Forest College was retained 
as the designation for the undergraduate school. 

After seventeen years of strenuous effort, President Tribble retired in 1967, leaving 
as his lasting memorial the removal of the College from Wake Forest to Winston- 
Salem and its changed status from college to university, with enhanced resources 
and academic distinction. As his successor the Trustees chose James Ralph Scales 
(1967-1983), former president of Oklahoma Baptist University and former dean of 
arts and sciences at Oklahoma State University. His administration saw important 
new developments. The Guy T and Clara H. Carswell Scholarship Fund, valued 
at $1,600,000, was established in 1967 in support of the undergraduate College. The 
new Graduate School of Management in 1969 was named in honor of Charles H. 
Babcock. Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and Nancy 



.. 



21 



Reynolds, a building was constructed to house the Babcock School; a subsequent 
gift of $2,000,000 was received from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation for 
endowment. The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center was opened in 1976, marking 
a major phase of the College's growth in comprehensive liberal arts education. An 
athletic center and additions to the School of Law building, Guy T. Carswell Hall, 
have further expanded the physical resources of the Reynolda Campus. 

Wake Forest has expanded its programs as well as its physical facilities. The 
University offers study for the baccalaureate degree in over thirty areas listed on 
page 54. Exchange programs with local institutions and with universities abroad 
have further expanded the range of choice and opportunity. In addition, Wake Forest 
maintains residential language centers in Venice and London for foreign study within 
the College curriculum. 

President Scales left office on October 1, 1983 to return to teaching as the 
University's first Worrell Professor of Anglo-American studies. The Trustees selected 
Thomas K. Hearn Jr., a philosopher and former dean for non-medical affairs at the 
University of Alabama-Birmingham, as the University's twelfth president. He was 
inaugurated on November 4, 1983. 

Wake Forest celebrates its sesquicentennial anniversary in 1984. 




John Williard, vice president and treasurer 



22 

Student Life 



Student life at the University is designed to offer a wide range of social, cultural, 
religious, and athletic resources to complement academic studies. The University 
is a community, and the sense of community is fostered by rich opportunities for 
personal growth. 

Student Government has jurisdiction in certain areas over all undergraduate 
students. Its judicial branch includes the Honor Council and the Judicial Board which 
hear cases involving violations of the honor code or of University rules. The College 
Union plans, directs, and funds activities. Men's social fraternities and women's 
societies are members of the Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils respectively. 
A Women's Residence Council represents all students who live on the south side 
of the campus. There are chapters of the major honor societies and professional 
societies for qualified students, and the University makes a number of academic 
awards for distinguished student achievement and service. Intercollegiate athletics 
for men and for women and an intramural sports program are strong, distinguished 
by tradition and by performance. Religious activities are central to the life of the 
University and, like campus cultural opportunities, are distinctive. The University 
offers a number of additional services to students relating to their physical and mental 
health, spiritual growth, and preparation for life. 



Student Government 

The executive branch of the Student Government is comprised of the four student 
body officers— president, vice president, secretary, treasurer— and the executive 
advisory committees. Reporting directly to the officers are various committees which 
work on improving service to students. These committees are open to all students. 

The Student Legislature is composed of fifty-five student representatives; the vice 
president of the student body serves as speaker. The Legislature represents the 
interests of students in social and academic matters and promotes and funds projects 
of benefit to the student body and the larger community. It oversees disbursement 
of funds to student groups and recommends the chartering of newly formed student 
organizations. Major committees are the Charter Committee, the Student Budget 
Advisory Committee, and the Student Economic Board. 

The Honor Code is an expression of the concern that students act with honor and 
integrity. It is an integral part of the Student Government as adopted by students 
and approved by the faculty. Its essence is that each student's word can be trusted 
implicitly and that any violation of a student's word is an offense against the whole 
community. The honor system obligates students neither to give nor receive aid 
on any examination, quiz, or other pledge work; to have complete respect for the 
property rights of others; not to make false or deceiving statements regarding 
academic matters to another member of the University community, nor to give false 
testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to confront any student who has violated 
the honor system and tell him or her that it is his or her responsibility to report 



23 



himself or herself or face the possibility of being reported to the Honor Council. 

The Honor Council consists of ten members— two co-chairpersons selected by the 
Honor Council of the previous year plus two representatives from each class. There 
are three non-voting faculty advisers. 

It is the duty of the Honor Council to receive, prefer, investigate, and arrange 
trial proceedings for all charges of violations of the Honor Code. A student who 
is found guilty of premeditated cheating is immediately suspended or expelled from 
the University. For convictions of lying, stealing, bad debts, interfering with the 
Honor Council, or other forms of cheating, the maximum penalty is expulsion and 
the minimum penalty is probation. Expulsion is automatic upon conviction for a 
second offense. All actions of the Honor Council are reported in writing to the dean 
of the College or the dean of the School of Business and Accountancy. 

Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent the 
University in any way until the period of punishment— whether suspension, 
probation, or another form— is completed and the student is returned to good 
standing. A student who has been suspended can be readmitted to the College 
only on the approval of the faculty or its Committee on Academic Affairs. During 
the period of suspension the student cannot be certified to another institution as 
being in good standing. 

The Case Referral Panel receives reports on violations of regulations, conducts 
necessary investigations, and draws up specific charges. Certain cases are referred 
to the director of housing. Otherwise, where a plea of guilty is entered, the Case 
Referral Panel levies a penalty. If a plea of not guilty or no plea is entered, the case 
is forwarded to the Student Judicial Board. 

The Student Judicial Board is composed of twelve members, at least three men and 
three women, who are elected at large from the student body. It is the duty of the 
Board to receive, prefer, and try all charges of social misconduct and violations of 
University rules and regulations for individual students as well as student 
organizations not covered by the Honor Council, the director of housing, or the 
Traffic Appeals Board. A student who violates these regulations or who behaves 
in such a way as to bring reproach upon him/herself or upon the University is subject 
to penalties ranging from verbal reprimand to suspension on the first offense. For 
further offenses, expulsion may occur. 



College Union 

Under the director of the College Union there are meeting and recreation rooms, 
lounges, offices for student organizations, a coffee house, and an information center. 
The College Union is responsible for scheduling entertainment activities, developing 
and presenting programs to complement academic studies, assisting student 
organizations, and providing supporting equipment and services. The College Union 
board of directors, representing all undergraduates, cooperates with the staff in daily 
operations and supervises the efforts of twelve committees and a large body of 
student volunteers. 



24 



Women's Residence Council 

The Women's Residence Council (which includes all residents on the south side 
of the campus) encourages the idea that a college education is not restricted to the 
classroom and library but occurs in informal settings as well. WRC sponsors a variety 
of co-curricular events including forums, social and sports events, informal seminars 
in the residence halls, mixers, fund raising projects, seminars in practical skills such 
as resume writing, a banquet to honor the Woman of the Year and Alumna of the 
Year, and a monthly newsletter. WRC is also involved in planning campus-wide 
events, such as Homecoming and Springfest. 

The Council has the following boards and committees under its jurisdiction: the 
executive board, the social and functions board, the social committee, the women's 
concerns committee, the physical facilities committee, and the publicity committee. 
The two house presidents of each of the four women's dormitories (Bostwick, 
Johnson, Babcock, and New Dorm), and a representative from each hall constitute 
the Dorm Council. WRC is a member of the North Carolina Association of Residence 
Halls. 

Women's Residence Council provides an excellent opportunity for women to 
become involved in campus life and to enhance their college experience. 

Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils 

The Interfraternity Council is the governing body of eleven social fraternities: Alpha 
Phi Alpha, Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Omega 
Psi Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, and Theta Chi. 
The purpose of the Council is to maintain a high standard of conduct and scholar- 
ship. A student must have a C average for the previous semester or a cumulative 
C average to be initiated. By order of the faculty, students who are on probation 
for any reason may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of their 
probationary period. 

The Intersociety Council is the governing body of seven societies for women, each 
of which has selective membership: Fideles, Lynks, Sophs, Steps, Strings, Thymes, 
and Phoenix. 

Both the Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils must follow University 
regulations. 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 

A number of nationally affiliated honor societies have been established: Alpha 
Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine), Beta Beta Beta (biology), Delta Phi Alpha (German), 
Delta Sigma Rho/Tau Kappa Alpha (debate), Eta Sigma Phi (classics), Lambda Alpha 
(anthropology), National Collegiate Players and Anthony Aston Society (drama), 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Pershing Rifles and 
Scabbard and Blade (military), Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and Mortar 
Board. There are student sections of the American Institute of Physics and the 
American Chemical Society; professional fraternities include Phi Alpha Delta and 
Phi Delta Phi (law). There are also chapters of the national service fraternities Alpha 



25 



Phi Omega and Circle K, as well as an Accounting Society, the American Marketing 
Association, a Physical Education Club, a Politics Club, and a Sociology Club. 

Academic Awards 

The following awards are made annually: the A. D. Ward Medal for the senior 
making the best address at commencement; the /. B. Currin Medal for the best oration, 
essay, or work of music or art on the topic "Christ in Modern Life"; the D. A. Brown 
Prize to the student whose writing most merits recognition; the M. D. Phillips Prize 
to the outstanding senior in Greek or Latin; the John Y. Phillips Prize to the outstanding 
senior in mathematics; the H. Broadus Jones Award to the student whose paper shows 
greatest insight into the works of Shakespeare; the Ruth Foster Campbell Award to 
the student whose ability in the Spanish language and spirit of joyful inquiry into 
Spanish culture have been most outstanding; the Forrest W. Clonts Award to the 
outstanding senior in history; the Forrest W. Clonts Research Prize for the out- 
standing paper written by a junior or senior non-American history major; the 
C. Chilton Pearson Research Prize for the outstanding paper written by a junior or 
senior American history major; the Phi Alpha Theta Research Prize for the best paper 
written by a junior or senior member; the Claud H. Richards Award to the outstanding 
senior in politics; the John Allen Easley Medal to the outstanding senior in religion; 
the American Bible Society Award for the outstanding senior biblical student; the Lura 
Baker Paden Medal to the outstanding senior in business; the Wall Street Journal Medal 
and a year's subscription to the Journal to the outstanding senior in finance; the 
A. M. Pullen and Company Medal to the senior with the highest achievement in 
accounting; the William E. Speas Award to the outstanding senior in physics; the 
Carolina Award to the major in biology who writes the best paper on a subject selected 
by the national biology society; the Biology Research Award to the major in biology 
who does the best piece of original research; the Poteat Award to the student in first 
year biology who plans to major in biology and is judged most outstanding. 

The William C. and Ruth N. Archie Award, established by a grant from Ruth N. 
Archie and from the Archies' son and daughter-in-law, William Archie Jr. and 
Margaret Archie, is given each year to the graduating senior who, in the opinion 
of the dean of the College and a faculty committee appointed by the dean, has shown 
most conspicuously a commitment to liberal learning, to scholarship, and to the 
ideals of Wake Forest College. In odd-numbered years the award is presented to 
a woman student; in even-numbered years it is presented to a male student. 

Intramural Athletics 

The intramural program operates under the auspices of the Department of Physical 
Education. It provides a variety of competitive activities for students, faculty, and 
staff. There are sports for male, female, and coed participation. Activities usually 
included in the intramural program are basketball, cross-country, football, golf, 
handball, racquetball, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, water polo, 
wrestling, and weight lifting. 

Students occasionally organize club teams for other sports and activities, which 
are not taught or directed by the College, but which are conducted as student 



26 



organizations with the approval of student government and the faculty. These have 
included rugby, karate, ice hockey, field hockey, hiking, rappelling, general 
conditioning, dance, and synchronized swimming. Students who are interested in 
a sport not offered through the College may organize themselves and petition the 
student government and faculty for approval. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

For men: 

Under the director of athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and participates in 
intercollegiate football, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, soccer, cross-country, and 
track. Under the military science staff there is also an intercollegiate program in 
riflery. 

The full scholarship allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association covers 
tuition, fees, room, board, and books. Wake Forest offers several special scholarships 
and awards: the Brian Piccolo Award for the football player judged by the coaching 
staff to best exemplify the qualities of Brian Piccolo during the annual North Carolina 
game; the Brian Piccolo Scholarship for the Chicago-area high school football player 
entering Wake Forest who best exemplifies the qualities of Brian Piccolo; the Arnold 
Palmer Award for the Wake Forest Athlete of the Year, as judged by lettermen from 
each team; the Buddy Worsham Scholarship for one golfer or more; the John R. Knott 
Scholarship for one golfer or more. 
For women: 

Under the director of women's athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association and participates in basketball, field hockey, golf, 
tennis, volleyball, cross-country, and track. 

The full scholarship allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association covers 
tuition, fees, room, board, and books. 



Religious Activities 

The Campus Ministry provides a variety of religious activities, including Thursday 
morning worship in Davis Chapel. In addition to seasonal celebrations throughout 
the liturgical year, there are retreats, Bible-study and discussion groups, and both 
independent and church-related social service in the larger community. Baptist, 
Roman Catholic, Episcopal, and Methodist chaplains represent their faiths and 
participate jointly in sponsoring activities. Wake Forest Baptist Church meets for 
weekly worship in Wait Chapel and embraces students, faculty, and members of 
the larger community. Membership is open without restriction to all who seek its 
ministry. 

The Ecumenical Institute sponsors lectures, colloquia, and publications which 
foster dialogue among clergy and lay members of Catholic, Jewish, and Protestant 
faiths. Most are open to students and to others in the community. 



27 



Cultural Activities 

b 

The University Theatre presents four major productions and several lab plays 
] annually, employing faculty, student, and visiting professional directors. Each year 
the College Union, with the assistance of the University Theatre, sponsors a musical 
dinner theatre, directed and performed by students. WFDD-FM broadcasts year- 
round to the campus and Piedmont North Carolina as an affiliate of National Public 
Radio. In addition to student announcers, producers, and technicians, it has a small 
professional staff. WAKE-AM, a completely student-operated radio station, plays 
popular music during a limited broadcast schedule. Intercollegiate debate at Wake 
I Forest has a long record of excellence, and the College hosts three annual debate 

I tournaments, the Franklin Shirley Dixie Classic, the Pride in Tobacco, and the High 
Q School Tournament. 

II Student publications include Old Gold and Black, a weekly newspaper; The Student, 
a literary magazine; and The Howler, the yearbook. The College Union sponsors 

! a major speaker series throughout the academic year, and departments in the Col- 
' lege engage specialists for other series. The Institute of Literature is a program of 
i writers, critics, and scholars in English, classical languages, German, and Romance 
5 languages. The Hester Philosophy Seminar is an annual colloquium devoted to the 

major problems of philosophy and their impact on the Christian faith and is a joint 
5 undertaking of the Department of Philosophy and the Ecumenical Institute. The 
i Robinson Lectures are held biennially and are administered by the Department of 

Religion. The Department of Psychology sponsors a colloquium series throughout 

the academic year. 
The Tocqueville Forum and the Luce Lectures bring nationally known speakers to 
1 campus— to lecture and teach— under major grants from the Smith Richardson 
j Foundation and the Henry Luce Foundation. 

Student musicians perform for academic credit in the Choral Union, the Concert 
: * Choir, the Madrigal Singers, the Opera Workshop, the University Symphony, the 

Demon Deacon Marching Band, the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the Concert Band, 
; the Jazz Ensemble, the Percussion Ensemble, the Woodwind Quintet, the Brass 

Quintet, and the Collegium Musicum. 
Under the director of concerts, major concerts in the Artists Series are performed 

in Wait Chapel by orchestras and artists from around the world. Visiting dance 
r soloists and companies and other musical programs are held in Brendle Recital Hall 
i in the James Ralph Scales Fine Arts Center. Recitals are played by both students 
I and guest carillonneurs on the Janet Jeffrey Carlile Harris Carillon. Students in the 
: Chapel Bell Guild play English handbells for convocations and services in Wait 

Chapel. The Department of Music sponsors performances by faculty members, 
' students, and visiting artists in most areas of applied music instruction. 
All concerts are open to students and to others in the community. 

In addition to studio instruction in the Department of Art, visiting painters, 
sculptors, and printmakers teach on campus and at the nearby Southeastern Center 
for Contemporary Art, sponsored jointly by the University and the Center. Reynolda 
House has a regular program of instruction in art history related to its special 
collection in American art. The College Union has an expanding collection of 



V 



28 



contemporary works of art, under student administration and exhibited in Reynolda 
Hall and elsewhere on campus. The T. J. Simmons Collection of paintings, etchings, 
lithographs, and sculpture is also distributed for permanent campus display. An 
active group of student photographers exhibits its own work and that of professional 
photographers in the College Union gallery adjacent to DeTamble Auditorium. 
Cultural resources in the community, in addition to Reynolda House and the 
Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, include the historic restored Moravian 
village of Old Salem, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the North 
Carolina School of the Arts and its associated professional performing companies 
in theatre, dance, and music, and the Winston-Salem Symphony and Chorale. Folk 
art, professional art, and crafts fairs are frequent. 

Educational Planning and Placement 

The office for educational planning and placement in Reynolda Hall offers 
counseling and consultation over the entire range of educational planning. Assistance 
is available in the choice of an academic major and in making other decisions that 
relate to professional or career commitments. Undergraduate and graduate students 
are invited to take advantage of these services. The office provides extensive library 
resources for use by students involved in planning and placement activities. 
Interviews with potential employers may be arranged through the office. 

University Counseling Center 

The University Counseling Center, located in 118 Reynolda Hall, offers a com- 
plete range of counseling and psychological services. Students can discuss their 
personal, educational, and career concerns with a professional counselor or a 
psychologist. A variety of tests is available to help students identify their vocational 
aptitudes, educational interests, study/learning skills, and personality traits. Special 
programs help students increase their self-confidence, manage their emotions, 
modify their behavior, or improve their relationships. Brochures on studying, stress 
management, substance abuse, and other topics are available. Psychological 
emergencies on campus are handled through the Center. Appointments are available 
Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon and 
between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. Confidentiality is assured and no fees are charged 
to students. Brian Austin is the director. 

Student Health Service 

The Student Health Service is located in Kitchin House and provides primary 
care services, including general health maintenance, diagnostic and treatment 
procedures, and referral to specialists. It is open when residence halls are in operation 
and requires a health information questionnaire on file for all students. The services 
of the clinical staff are covered by tuition; there are additional charges for injections, 
medications, laboratory tests, special physical examinations, and bed care. 



29 

Procedures 

All students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the portions of this bulletin 

i which pertain to their course of study. Statements concerning courses and expenses are not 

be to regarded as irrevocable contracts between the student and the institution. The University 

reserves the right to change the schedule of classes and the cost of instruction at any time 

within the student's term of residence. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission must furnish evidence of maturity and educational 
achievement. The Committee on Admissions carefully considers the applicant's 
academic records, scores on tests, and evidence of character, motivation, goals, and 
general fitness for study in the College. The applicant's secondary school program 
must establish a commitment to the kind of broad liberal education reflected in the 
academic requirements of the College. 

Admission as a freshman normally requires graduation from an accredited 
secondary school with a minimum of sixteen units of high school credit. These 
should include four units in English, three in mathematics, two in history and social 
studies, two in a single foreign language, and one in the natural sciences. An 
applicant who presents at least twelve units of differently distributed college 
preparatory study can be considered. A limited number of applicants may be ad- 
mitted without the high school diploma, with particular attention given to ability, 
maturity, and motivation. 

All persons admitted are required to submit a health history, along with the results 
of a physical examination and certain laboratory tests to the director of the Student 
Health Service. If a person who has been accepted but has not yet enrolled has 
or develops a health problem which, in the judgment of the director of the health 
service, creates a danger to the safety and well-being of the student or others, that 
person may be required to delay matriculation until the problem is resolved. 

Application 

An application is secured from the Office of Admissions in person or by mail 
(7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109). It should be 
completed and returned to that office, if possible no later than January 15 for the 
fall semester. Most admissions decisions for the fall semester are made by March 
1, with prompt notification of applicants. For the spring semester application should 
be completed and returned, if possible no later than October 15. Except in emergency 
the final date for applying for the fall semester is August 5 and for the spring semester 
January 1. Application on this last-date basis is primarily for non-residential students. 

The admission application requires records and recommendations directly from 
secondary school officials. It also requires test scores, preferably from the senior 
year, on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
An accompanying Achievement Test is optional. All test scores should be sent directly 



V 



30 

to the University by Educational Testing Service. A $20 fee to cover the cost of 
processing must accompany an application. It cannot be applied to later charges 
for accepted students or refunded for others. The University reserves the right to reject 
any application without explanation. 

A $200 admission deposit is required of all students accepted and must be sent 
to the Office of Admissions no later than three weeks following notice of acceptance. 
It is credited toward first semester fees and is refunded in the event of cancellation 
of application by the student, provided a written request for refund is received by 
the Office of Admissions no later than May 1 for the fall semester or November 
1 for the spring semester. (Students notified of acceptance after May 1 for the fall 
semester or November 1 for the spring semester should make the admission deposit 
within two weeks of notification.) Deposits made after May 1 and November 1 are 
not refundable. Failure to make the admission deposit is taken as cancellation of 
application by the student. No deposit is required for summer session enrollment. 

Early Decision 

An early decision plan is available to well qualified high school students who 
decide by the close of their junior year that their first college choice is Wake Forest. 
An early decision agreement is required with the application, which is sent to the 
Office of Admissions after completion of the junior year or by late October of the 
senior year. Along with high school record, recommendations, and scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, at least one Achievement Test, especially in English 
composition, is strongly recommended. 

Candidates for early decision are normally expected to have completed, or be 
enrolled in courses to complete, all the natural science, foreign language, literature, 
and mathematics requirements of secondary school; to offer a minimum 3.5 quality 
point average in work of record; and to have achieved a minimum on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test of 1200. 

Early decision applicants are notified of acceptance no later than November 1 for 
the fall semester, and the admission deposit is required by January 1. Applicants 
not admitted are asked to submit a senior year Scholastic Aptitude Test score and 
first semester senior year grade record, or are advised to apply elsewhere. 

Admission of Handicapped Students 

Wake Forest College will consider the application of any qualified student on the 
basis of personal and academic merit, regardless of handicap. A system of ramps 
and elevators makes all of the programs at Wake Forest accessible to those in 
wheelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladly help handicapped 
students make arrangements to meet special needs. Students who seek further 
information should consult the admissions office or the University's Office of Equal 
Opportunity. 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 

Advanced placement credit for college level work done in high school is available 
on the basis of the Advanced Placement Examination of the College Entrance 



31 

Examination Board and supplementary information. Especially well-qualified 
applicants for advanced standing may also be exempted from some basic and 
divisional courses with credit on the authorization of the department concerned. 
Credit by advanced standing is treated in the same manner as credit transferred 
from another college. 

Under certain conditions especially well prepared applicants may be granted 
limited college credit through the subject tests of the College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) of the Educational Testing Service. Such credit may be assigned 
with the approval of the department concerned or the dean of the School of Business 
and Accountancy. 



Admission of Transfer Students 

The number of transfer students who can be admitted each year depends upon 
the availability of space in the freshman (second semester), sophomore, and junior 
classes. An applicant for admission who has attended another college must be a 
graduate of a standard junior college or furnish a certificate of honorable dismissal 
stating eligibility in all respects to enter the college last attended, and must have 
an overall average of at least C on all college work attempted. A student who is 
admitted from another college before fully meeting the prescribed admissions 
requirements for entering freshmen must remove the entrance conditions during 
the first year at Wake Forest. 

The writing of transfer students is evaluated during the orientation period each 
semester, and students whose writing is deficient are given a composition condition. 
For removal of a composition condition the student is required to take English 11 
during the first semester for which he or she registers following the assignment 
of the cc. Removal of the deficiency is prerequisite to graduation. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited colleges are accepted subject 
to faculty approval. In general, no credit is allowed for courses not found in the 
Wake Forest curriculum. The minimum residence requirement for a baccalaureate 
degree is two academic years, the senior and one other. 



Expenses 

Statements concerning expenses are not to be regarded as forming an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. The costs of instruction and other services outlined 
herein are those in effect on the date of publication of this bulletin, and the University reserves 
the right to change without notice the cost of instruction and other services at any time. 

An admission deposit of $200, which is applied toward tuition and fees for the 
semester for which the student has been accepted, is required to complete admission. 
Charges are due in full on August 1 for the fall semester and December 15 for the 
spring semester. Faculty regulations require that student accounts be settled in full 
before the student is entitled to receive a grade report, transcript, or diploma, or 
to register for the following semester or term. 



32 I 

Tuition 

Per Semester Per Year 

Full-Time (twelve or more credits) $2,775 $5,550 

Part-Time $170 per credit 

Students enrolled in the College or in the School of Business and Accountanq : 
for full-time residence credit are entitled to full privileges regarding libraries 
laboratories, athletic contests, concerts, publications, the College Union, th( 
University Theatre, and the health service. Part-time students are entitled to tht 
use of the libraries and laboratories but not to the other privileges mentioned above 
They may secure a part-time student ID card, admissions to games and concerts 
and publications by paying an activity fee of $75 per semester. 



Room Charges 




Per Semester 


Per Year 


$455-460 


$910-920 



Double occupancy 

Most rooms available for first year students are $455 per semester for men anc 
$460 for women. Other room rentals range from $400 to $585. 

Food Services 

A cafeteria, soda shop, and table service dining room are located in Reynold; 
Hall. Board plans are available for $980, $1,120, $1,270, and $1,380 per year. The formal 
of these plans is a credit card system in which the student is charged only for the 
amount of food purchased at the time it is purchased. The plan may be used at 
any University food services facility, and it allows a great deal of flexibility for eating 
off campus. 

Freshmen living in dormitories are required to participate in one of the board plans. 

Other Charges 

Admission application fee of $20 is required with each application for admission tc 
cover the cost of processing and is non-refundable. 

Admission deposit of $200 is required of each student entering for the first time oi 
returning after a period of non-attendance and must be sent to the director oi 
admissions within three weeks after acceptance for admission or readmission. The 
deposit is credited to the student's charges for the semester for which he or she 
has been accepted for admission. It is refunded if the director of admissions is 
notified in writing prior to May 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring 
semester of cancellation of plans to enter the College. 

Applied music fees are required in addition to tuition for students enrolling for individual 
class study in applied music in the Department of Music and are payable in the 
Office of the Treasurer. The fee for one credit per semester is $110 and for two credits 
per semester is $175. 



33 



Hospital bed and board charges are made when the student is confined to the Student 
Health Service, at a rate of $44.50 per day. An additional charge is made for special 
services and expensive drugs. Students must have hospital insurance. A group plan 
is available through the University for those not covered by a family plan. A $2 
charge is added to overdue bills. 
Key deposit of $5 is required for each key issued to a residence hall room and is 
c refunded when the key is returned. 

, Late registration fee of $10 is charged to students registering after the dates set by 
, the faculty. 

Library fines are charged for lost books and for violation of other library regulations 
and are payable in the library. 

A tuition deposit of $200 is required, at a date set by the Office of the Treasurer, of 
students enrolled in the spring semester who expect to return for the fall semester. 
It is credited to the student's University charges and is refunded if the treasurer 
is notified in writing prior to June 1 that the student will not return. 

Room change fee of $5 is charged for authorized room changes made after February 
15 in the spring semester. The fine is $20 for any unauthorized change. 
Special examination fee of $2.50 is required for each examination taken to remove a 
j course condition. 

Student apartment rental is payable at $145 per month. 

Motor vehicle registration and traffic fines are $55 and $5 to $10, respectively. All 

students operating a vehicle on campus (including student apartments and the 

Graylyn Conference Center) must register vehicles they are operating day or night, 

'■ whether or not owned by the operator. All vehicle registrations must be completed 

r within twenty-four hours from the first time the vehicle is brought to campus. Fines 

' are assessed against students violating parking regulations, copies of which are 

obtainable from the University Public Safety Office. Proof of ownership must be 

1 presented when applying for vehicle registration. 

Transcripts of a student's record are issued at a cost of $2 each. 



Refunds 

During the academic year, all students, full- and part-time, receive tuition refunds 
according to the following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping courses 
as well as those withdrawing. Withdrawals must be official and students must return 
their ID cards before claiming refunds. There is no refund of room rent. 

Number of Weeks Percentage of Total Tuition 

Attendance to be Refunded 

1 Total Tuition Less $200 

2 75 percent 

3 50 percent 

4 25 percent 



34 



Housing 

All unmarried freshmen students are required to live in residence halls, excep i 
(1) when permission is granted by the dean of students for the student to live wit! I 
parents or a relative in the Winston-Salem area or (2) by special arrangement whei 
Space is not available on campus or (3) if the student has lost residence hall spaa 
because of a room contract violation or disciplinary action. Fifth-year students ar< 
ineligible for housing. Married students are not usually allowed to live in residena 
halls except when permitted by the dean of students. Residence halls are supervisee i 
by the director of housing, the assistant dean of students for residence life, are; 
coordinators, and hall directors under the direction of the dean of students. 

The following charges per year apply for each student in the residence halls: ir 
Kitchin House, Poteat House, Davis House, Taylor House, Huffman Hall, and Efirc 
Hall, $740 for triple rooms, $800 for small double rooms, $910 for large double rooms 
and $1,140 for single rooms; double rooms in the suites with interior lounges an 
$1,060 for large rooms and $840 for small rooms; in Johnson and Bostwick Residence 
Halls, $920 for double rooms and $1,100 for single rooms; in Babcock Residence 
Hall, $1,060 for double rooms and $1,160 for single rooms; in New Dormitory, $1,17( 
for double rooms; in each of four town house apartments, $1,170 per occupant 
Students living in faculty apartments and language houses pay $1,170 (the New 
Dormitory rate). For each of the forty-six married student apartments the charge 
is $145 per month. For each of the ten apartments which are shared by two single 
graduate students, the charge is $100 per occupant, or $200 per month. 



Academic Calendar 

The academic calendar of the College and the School of Business and Accountancy 
includes a fall semester ending before Christmas, a spring semester beginning in 
January and ending in May, and two five-week summer sessions. Semesters usual- 
ly last fifteen weeks. 



Orientation and Advising 

A three-day orientation period for new students in the College precedes registration 
for the fall semester. An academic adviser who is either a member of the faculty 
or an upperclassman in the peer-advising program provides guidance during and 
between registration periods throughout the student's freshman and sophomore 
years. Peer advisers are supervised by members of the faculty. Advisers meet with 
students both individually and in small groups. Students are encouraged to take 
the initiative in arranging additional meetings at any time they feel a need for advice 
or other assistance. The adviser suggests and approves courses of instruction until 
the student declares a major in a field of study at the end of the sophomore year. 
At that time a new adviser is assigned from the department or departments 
concerned. 



35 

Registration 

A two-day registration period for all students in the College and the School of 
-Business and Accountancy opens the fall semester and the spring semester. 
'Registration involves (1) payment of all tuition and fees in full to the treasurer, 
'[2) obtaining a summary of prior record from the registrar, (3) consultation with 
t-he academic adviser, (4) sectioning of classes by departmental representatives, and 
\5) verification of registration cards with class schedules by the registrar. 

J Classification 

Classification of students by class standing and as full-time or part-time is calculated 
n terms of credits. Most courses in the College and the School of Business and 

Accountancy have a value of four credits, but others vary from one credit to five. 
Hie normal load for a full-time student is eighteen credits per semester, with nineteen 

'twenty if only four courses are involved) being the maximum permitted at 
registration. A student may not register for more than twenty credits per semester 
without the permission of the appropriate dean or the Committee on Academic 

*M fairs. Twelve credits per semester constitutes minimum full-time registration. 

"Recipients of North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants must be enrolled for at least 
ourteen credits each semester— by the tenth day of classes. Recipients of veterans 

benefits, grants from state government, and other governmental aid must meet the 

'niidelines of the appropriate agencies.) A student may not register for fewer than 

: welve credits without specific permission from the Committee on Academic Affairs 
o register as a part-time student. 

A full-time student in the fall semester of any year may not be a part-time 
student in the spring semester immediately following. Any student who peti- 
ions for part-time status within the semester in which he or she wishes to gain 
such status is not eligible for a tuition refund. 

The requirements for classification after the freshman year are as follows: 
.ophomore— the removal of all entrance conditions and the completion of not 
ewer than 29 credits credits toward a degree, with a minimum of 58 grade points; 
unior— the completion of not fewer than 60 credits toward a degree, with a 
ninimum of 120 grade points; senior— not fewer than 108 credits toward a degree, 
vith a minimum of 216 grade points. 

Class Attendance 
i 

■ Attendance regulations place the responsibility for class attendance on the 
student, who is expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. One of the 
nost vital aspects of the residential college experience is attendance in the 
:lassrooms; its value cannot be fully measured by testing procedures alone. 

1 Students are considered sufficiently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular 
ittendance, to accept this personal responsibility, to demonstrate the self- 
liscipline essential for such performance, and to recognize and accept the 
:onsequences of failure to attend. Students who are deemed to be causing their 
vork or that of the class to suffer because of absence or lateness may be referred 
)y the instructor to the dean of the College or to the dean of the School of Business 



36 

and Accountancy, as appropriate, for suitable action. Any student who does not 
attend classes regularly or who demonstrates other evidence of academic 
irresponsibility is subject to such disciplinary action as the Committee on 
Academic Affairs may prescribe, including immediate suspension from the 
College or the School of Business and Accountancy. 

The office of the dean of the College maintains a list of students who have 
been absent from class because of illness as certified by the Student Health 
Service, because of other extenuating circumstances, or as authorized 
representatives of the College whose names have been submitted by appropriate 
officials forty-eight hours in advance of the hour when the absences are to begin. 
Such absences are considered excused and a record of them is available to the 
student's instructor upon request. The instructor determines whether work 
missed can be made up. 

Auditing Courses 

When space is available after the registration of regularly enrolled students, 
others may request permission of the instructor to enter the course as auditors. 
No additional charge is made to full-time students in the College or in the School 
of Business and Accountancy; for others the fee is $60 per course, and permission 
of the appropriate dean, as well as that of the instructor, is required. An auditor 
is subject to attendance regulations and to other conditions imposed by the 
instructor. Although an auditor receives no credit, a notation of audit is made 
on the final grade report and entered on the record of regularly enrolled students 
who have met the instructor's requirements. In no case may anyone register for 
an audit course before the first meeting of the class. An audit course may not 
be changed to a credit course, and a credit course may not be changed to an 
audit course. 

Dropping a Course 

The last day in each term for dropping a class without a grade of F is listed 
in the calendar in the front of this bulletin. A student who wishes to drop any 
course before this date must consult the registrar and his or her faculty adviser. 
After this date, the student who wishes to drop a course must consult his or 
her faculty adviser, the course instructor, and the dean of the College or the dean 
of the School of Business and Accountancy as appropriate. If the dean approves 
the request, he authorizes the student to discontinue the course. Except in the 
case of an emergency, the grade in the course will be recorded as F. 

If, at any time, a student drops any course without prior, written approval of 
the appropriate dean, the student will be subject to academic probation for the 
following semester or to such other penalties as the Committee on Academic 
Affairs of the faculty may impose. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the College or the School 
of Business and Accountancy must do so through the office of the appropriate 



37 

dean. With the approval of the dean of the College or the dean of the School 
of Business and Accountancy, no grades are recorded for the student for that 
semester, but the student's standing in courses at the time of the withdrawal 
is taken into consideration when readmission is sought. If withdrawal is for 
academic reasons, failing grades may be assigned in all courses in which the 
student is doing unsatisfactory work. A student who leaves the College or the 
School of Business and Accountancy without officially withdrawing is assigned 
failing grades in all current courses, and the unofficial withdrawal is recorded. 

Examinations 

i 

Final examinations are given at regularly scheduled times. All examinations are 
conducted ir> accordance with the honor system adopted by the student body and 
approved by the faculty. Under it the student is expected to refrain from unfairness 
in any form and to report to the Honor Council any student he or she knows to 
be cheating. Examinations are turned in with a signed statement that no aid has 
been given or received. 

Grading 

For most courses carrying undergraduate credit there are five final and two 
conditional grades: A (exceptionally high achievement), B (superior), C (satisfactory), 
D (passing but unsatisfactory), E (conditional failure), and I (incomplete). 

Grade of E. The grade of E entitles the student to reexamination at any regular 
examination period within a year, or during the first week of the fall semester. A 
permit for reexamination must be obtained in advance from the registrar, and no 
grade higher than D may be assigned as a result of reexamination. A student who 
does not remove a conditional failure by reexamination must repeat the course to 
obtain credit for it. 

Grade of I. The grade of I may be assigned only when because of illness or some 
other emergency a student does not complete the work of the course. If the work 
recorded as I is not completed within thirty days after the student enters for his 
or her next semester, the grade automatically becomes F. The instructor must report 
the final grade to the registrar within forty-five days after the beginning of that 
semester. 

Grade Points. Grades are assigned grade points for the computation of academic 
averages, class standing, and eligibility for continuation, as follows: for each credit 
of A, four points; for each credit of B, three points; for each credit of C, two points; 
for each credit of D, one point; for each credit of E or F, no points. 

Pass/Fail. To encourage students to venture into fields outside their major areas 
of competence and concentration, the undergraduate schools make available the 
option, under certain conditions, of registering in courses on a Pass/Fail basis rather 
than for a letter grade. Courses taken under the Pass/Fail option yield full credit 
when satisfactorily completed, but whether passed or not they are not computed 
in the grade point average. 

A student may count toward the degree no more than twenty-four credits taken 
on a Pass/Fail basis. Freshmen and sophomores are not eligible to elect the Pass/Fail 



u 



38 

mode, but may enroll for courses offered on a Pass/Fail basis only. A student may 
during the junior and senior years only elect up to a total of sixteen credits on a 
Pass/Fail basis, but no more than five credits in a given semester. Courses used to 
fulfill basic, divisional, or major requirements may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis 
unless they are offered only on that basis. Courses in the major(s) not used for 
satisfying major requirements may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis only if the depart- 
ment of the major does not specify otherwise. 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 

A mid-term report and a final report of grades are issued to students by the registrar 
in the fall and spring semesters. A final report of grades is issued for each summer 
term. 

Copies of a student's cumulative record are issued by the registrar, but only on 
the written authorization of the student and payment of $2 per transcript. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List is issued at the end of the fall and spring semesters. It includes 
all full-time students in the College and the School of Business and Accountancy 
who have a grade point average of 3.0 or better for the semester and who have earned 
no grade below C during the semester. 

Graduation Distinctions 

Graduation distinctions are determined by the grade point system. A degree 
candidate with a total average of not less than 3.80 for all courses attempted is 
graduated with the distinction summa cum laude. A candidate with a total average 
of not less than 3.50 for all courses attempted is graduated with the distinction magna 
cum laude. A candidate with a total average of not less than 3.00 for all courses at- 
tempted is graduated with the distinction cum laude. The entire record of a student 
is considered, with the understanding that a transfer student may receive no distinc- 
tion which requires a quality point ratio greater than that earned in Wake Forest 
University. Details are available in the office of the registrar. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course for which he or she has already 
received a grade of C or higher. (When a student repeats a course previously 
passed, he or she may not earn additional credit for that course. Both grades, 
however, will be considered in calculating the student's grade point average.) 

Probation 

A student is responsible at all times for knowing his or her academic standing. 
Any student who at the end of the fall semester does not have the grade average 
normally required for continuation at the end of the following spring semester is 
automatically on academic probation. 



j 39 

1 Any student who is placed on probation because of Honor Code or conduct code 
violations is placed on such special academic probation as the Committee on 
Academic Affairs imposes. The Committee on Academic Affairs may at any time 

1 place on probation a student whose academic performance or social behavior is 

^inconsistent with what the committee deems to be in the best interest of the student 
or the University. 

Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent the 
University in any way until the period of suspension or probation is completed and 
the student is returned to good standing. Students who are on probation for any 

f reason may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of their probationary 

.period. 



in Requirements for Continuation 

Each student is expected to be aware at all times of his or her academic status 
and to be responsible for knowing whether he or she has met the University's 
minimum academic requirements for continuation as outlined below. 
B On the basis of their cumulative records at the end of the spring semester, those 
'students are academically ineligible to enroll for the following fall (1) who have 
' attempted fewer than 54 credits in all colleges and universitites attended and have 
a grade point average of less than 1.35 on work attempted for a grade in the College 
or the School of Business and Accountancy; (2) who have attempted as many as 
54 but fewer than 98 credits in all colleges and universities attended and have a 
,j grade point average of less than 1.65 on work attempted for a grade in the College 
,or the School of Business and Accountancy; (3) who have attempted as many as 
[ 98 but fewer than 135 credits in all colleges and universities attended and have a 
.grade point average of less than 1.85 on all work attempted for a grade in the Col- 
lege or the School of Business and Accountancy; (4) who have attempted 135 credits 
s or more in all colleges and universities attended and have a grade point average 
of less than 1.90 on work attempted for a grade in the College or the School of 
; Business and Accountancy. Non-credit courses, courses taken Pass/Fail, and CLEP 
and advanced placement credit are not computed in the grade point average. (For 
the purpose of determining eligibility for graduation, the grade point average is 
computed on all work attempted in Wake Forest College and the School of Business 
and Accountancy, and is also computed on all work attempted in all accredited col- 
leges and universities.) 

} Ordinarily a student who is ineligible to continue may attend the first summer 
y term and if successful in raising the grade point average to the required minimum 
may enroll for the following fall semester. The student may attend the second sum- 
mer term if unsuccessful in the first, and if successful then may enroll for the follow- 
ing spring semester. If unsuccessful in meeting the minimum requirements by the 
end of the second summer term, the student may apply for readmission no earlier 
than the following summer session. 

Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student, 

• and after consultation with the appropriate dean, the student may petition the 

Committee on Academic Affairs for an exception to the foregoing eligibility 



V 



40 

requirements. The Committee on Academic Affairs may suspend at the end of an 
semester or term any student whose record for that term has been unsatisfactory 
particularly with regard to the number of courses passed and failed, or any studer 
who has not attended class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules and reguk 
tions of the College or the School of Business and Accountancy. 

A student who has or develops a health problem which in the judgment of th 
director of the Student Health Service creates a danger to the safety and well-bein 
of the student or others may be required to withdraw until the problem is resolvec 

Requirements for Readmission 

A student seeking readmission to the College must meet the minimum academi 
requirements for continuation. However, a student who has not met the requirement 
(1) may apply for admission to the summer session only, (2) may apply fo 
readmission after an absence from the College of at least a year and a half, (3) ma 
apply for readmission after less than a year and a half if enrolled in another colleg 
or university, or (4) may apply for readmission if the failure to meet minimur 
requirements was due to exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the contrc 
of the student. 

Senior Conditions 

A candidate for graduation in the final semester who receives a grade of E in th' 
previous semester may apply to the registrar for reexamination thirty days after th. 
opening of the final semester but not less than thirty days before its close. Al 
conditions must be removed not less than thirty days before the end of the las 
semester or term of the student's graduation year. The name of a candidate wh< 
has a condition after that date is dropped from the list of candidates. A candidat 
who receives a grade of E in the final semester or term of the graduation year i 
not allowed reexamination before the next examination period. 

Summer Study 

For full-time students, courses taken in the summer at another college or university 
require the advance approval of the head of the department concerned and th 
registrar. Courses taken elsewhere on the semester hour plan are computed a 
transfer credit at 1.125 credits for each approved semester hour. 

In addition to regular courses, a number of special summer programs for credi 
are described in the bulletin of the summer session. 

Transfer Credit 

All work attempted in other colleges and universities is to be reported to th< 
registrar of Wake Forest University. Students wishing to receive transfer credit fo 
work satisfactorily completed elsewhere must obtain faculty approval, preferabh 
in advance. Students should be aware that the minimum grade point average (2.0 
for graduation is computed on all work attempted in Wake Forest College and th< 
School of Business and Accountancy, and is also computed on all work attemptec 
in all accredited colleges and universities. 



41 

Scholarships and Loans 

Any student admitted to Wake Forest College who demonstrates financial need 

will receive assistance commensurate with that need. 

I By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all financial aid must be approved by the 

[ Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Applications should be requested 

from the committee at 7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 

Scholarships supported by funds of the undergraduate schools are not granted to 

students enrolled in other schools of the University. To receive consideration for 

financial aid, the applicant must either be enrolled as an undergraduate or have 

1 been accepted for admission. The financial aid program comprises institutional, 

' state, and federal scholarship, loan, and work funds. Full-time students are eligible 

i to apply for federal funds. Half- and part-time students are eligible to apply for 

r limited institutional funds. 

- Need is a factor in the awarding of most financial aid, and each applicant must 

fl file a financial statement with the application for financial aid. After reviewing the 

~( standard financial analysis, the Committee on Scholarships determines aid awards, 

and aid is credited, by semester, to the student's account in the office of the treasurer. 

The Committee on Scholarships reserves the right to revoke financial aid for 

unsatisfactory academic achievement or for violation of University regulations or 

federal, state, or local laws. To be eligible for renewal of aid, a student must remain 

enrolled on a normal full-time basis and be in good standing, making satisfactory 

• progress toward a degree. The committee does not award institutional scholarships 

3 to students earning less than a 2.0 grade average on all work attempted at Wake 

' Forest. 

pi 

Scholarships 

The Reynolds Scholarships are awarded each year to four extraordinarily capable 
men or women entering the College as first year students. Made possible through 
a grant from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, these scholarships cover the cost 
; of tuition, room, and board, and include an allowance for books and personal 
expenses. Scholars may receive up to $1,500 each summer for travel or study pro- 
jects approved by the Reynolds Committee. The Reynolds Scholarships are award- 
ed without regard to financial need and will be renewed annually through the 
recipients' fourth year of college, subject to satisfactory performance. 

The O. W. Wilson Scholarship, created under the will of O. W. Wilson of Yancey 
County, North Carolina is awarded to an individual who demonstrates outstanding 
qualities of intellectual promise and leadership. The scholarship has a value 
equivalent to annual tuition and provides summer grant opportunities to encourage 
individual study projects. 

The Guy T. Carswell Scholarships, made possible by and established in honor of 
the late Guy T. Carswell and his wife Clara Carswell of Charlotte, North Carolina, 
carry an annual value ranging from a minimum stipend of $2,000 to a maximum 
stipend of $8,000, with awards for more than $2,000 determined on the basis of need. 
Each scholar may apply for at least one summer grant of up to $1,000 to fund travel 



V 



42 

and study projects of the student's design. A Carswell scholar must be a student 
applying to the College who possesses outstanding qualities of intellect and 
leadership. Up to forty scholars are selected annually. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Freshmen, made possible by the late 
Colonel George Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina for residents of North 
Carolina or children of alumni living in other states, with preference given to 
residents of Davidson County, North Carolina, have a value of up to $8,000. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Upperclassmen for students who have been 
enrolled for at least one semester, with preference given to applicants from Davidson 
County, North Carolina, vary in value according to need. 

The Alcoa Foundation Scholarship, donated by the Alcoa Foundation, is available 
to a freshman from the Piedmont area of North Carolina who is majoring in 
chemistry. The scholarship has a value of $2,000 and is awarded on the basis of need. 

The Alpha Phi Omega Scholarship, established by the Kappa Theta Chapter of Alpha 
Phi Omega, is made available in alternate years to a freshman who presents evidence 
of need and an excellent high school record. It has a minimum value of $200. 

The Camillo Artom Fund for Italian Studies was established in 1976 in honor of Camillo 
Artom, professor of biochemistry from 1939 to 1969. Scholarship aid is made available, 
usually to one or two students each semester, to assist with their expenses. Well 
qualified students who can demonstrate need are eligible to apply. (Interested 
persons should apply in the office of the provost.) 

The George M. and Daisy Olive Beavers Scholarship Fund, donated by Lydia Beavers 
in memory of her parents, is for one scholarship awarded on the basis of leadership, 
good citizenship, and excellence of character. 

The Eliza Pratt Brown Scholarship, donated by the late Junius Calvin Brown of 
Madison, North Carolina in honor of his wife Eliza Pratt Brown, is used to assist 
needy, worthy, and deserving students from North Carolina, with preference given 
to students from the town of Madison and Rockingham County, for a maximum 
of $2,000. 

The}. G. Carroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship, donated in memory of J. G. Carroll, 
former associate professor of mathematics, is made to a deserving athlete who is 
not on a regular athletic scholarship, for a value of approximately $100. 

The James Lee Carver Scholarship, donated by Jean Freeman Carver with her children 
James Lee Carver II and Elizabeth Jeanine Carver in memory of her husband James 
Lee Carver, is for deserving and promising students who demonstrate a need for 
financial assistance, with preference given to students from the Oxford Orphanage 
in Oxford, North Carolina, for a value of approximately $300. 

The College Scholarships, in the amount of $100 to $5,000 each, are available to 
freshmen and upperclassmen presenting satisfactory academic records and evidence 
of need. 

The Jennifer Rose Cooke and Laura Elizabeth Scales Memorial Scholarship, established 
by Charles H. Cooke of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in memory of the daughters 
of Charles H. and Edith Cooke and James Ralph and Betty Scales, carries a minimum 
stipend of $3,600 and is awarded on the basis of academic ability and commitment 
to serve in the field of international relations. Application is made to a special 
committee. 






43 

The William Henry Crouch Scholarship for ministerial students has been established 
by the Providence Baptist Church of Charlotte, North Carolina in honor of its pastor. 
The scholarship is valued at $3,000 per year and is available for a North Carolina 
Baptist ministerial student or students based upon merit or need. 

The O. B. Crowell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by Louise T. Crowell of 
Hendersonville, North Carolina in memory of her husband O. B. Crowell, is awarded 
on the basis of character, need, and promise, for a value of approximately $600. 

The Gary Franklin Culler Scholarship Fund, donated in memory of Gary Franklin 
Culler, is awarded on the basis of academic ability and outstanding leadership 
potential, with preference given to students from High Point, North Carolina, for 
a value of approximately $700. 

The J. B. Dickinson ]r. Scholarship, donated by Bonders Inc. of Dunn, North Carolina 
in memory of John Brewer Dickinson Jr., is awarded to a rising senior accounting 
major on the basis of academic excellence and professional promise. 

The Lecausey P. and Lula H. Freeman Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. 
Singleton of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of the parents of Mrs. Singleton, 
is available to a freshman, sophomore, or junior whose home is within the West 
Chowan Baptist Association of North Carolina, with preference given to Bertie Coun- 
ty students, on the basis of need and ability. Residents of the Roanoke Association 
may be considered for the scholarship, which is renewable on the basis of need 
and ability except for the senior year, for a value of approximately $200. 

The Charles A. Frueauff Scholarships are provided annually by the Charles A. 
Frueauff Foundation for middle-income students who live outside North Carolina. 
Amounts vary according to need, up to $1,500. 

The James W. Gill Scholarship, donated by Ruth R. Gill in memory of her husband 
James W. Gill, provides a scholarship for a deserving student, with preference given 
to students from Montgomery and Prince George Counties, Maryland, for a value 
of approximately $600. 

The Eugene Basil Glover Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an incoming or enrolled 
student based on ability and need, with slight preference given to students from 
Halifax County, North Carolina. 

The Wallace Barger Goebel Scholarship, made possible through a donation from 
Miriam M. Goebel, is based upon ability and financial need, with first preference 
given to a student with an interest in literature, second preference to a student with 
an interest in history, and third preference to a student enrolled in the pre-medical 
program, for a value of approximately $400. 

The Fuller Hamrick Scholarship, created under the will of the late Everett C. Snyder 
of Wake Forest, North Carolina in memory of Fuller Hamrick, is used to educate 
students from the Mills Home in Thomasville, North Carolina, for a value of 
approximately $550. 

The Margaret S. Hasty Memorial Scholarship Fund, established by Judge Fred H. Hasty 
in memory and honor of his beloved wife, is for one or more female undergraduate 
students with good academic ability and financial need. The scholarship is renewable 
if the student places in the upper third of her class. 

The Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship, donated by Kate H. Hobgood of Reidsville, North 
Carolina in memory of her husband, is available to those who qualify on the basis 



V 



44 

of character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to those wh 
plan to enter the ministry, do religious work, become teachers, or become lawyer 
the preference being in the order named, for the residents of the Reidsville, Nort 
Carolina area recommended by the deacons of the First Baptist Church of ReidsvilL 
and for a value of $500. 

The Forrest H. Hollifield Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hollifield i 
memory of their son Forrest H. Hollifield, is awarded to upperclassmen wit 
evidence of character and need, with preference given to natives of Rowan an 
Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and to members of the Delta Nu Chapter ( 
Sigma Chi Fraternity. 

The George W. Kane Scholarship, established by the George W. Kane Company i 
honor of George W. Kane, former member of the Wake Forest College Board c 
Visitors, is a full tuition scholarship and is awarded on the basis of academic mer 
and need. 

The }. Lee Keiger Sr. Scholarship is an academic scholarship awarded annually t 
a North Carolina student, with preference given to students living in the ALLTEI 
Carolina Telephone Company service region, for a value of $750. 

The Sarah C. and C. A. Kent Scholarships are awarded to freshmen and uppe 
classmen on the basis of leadership, academic merit, and financial need, withoi 
regard to race, religion, sex, or geographical origin. 

The Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by the Delta Nu Chapte 
of Sigma Chi Fraternity, makes available one or two scholarships, with preferenc 
given to members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, upon recommendation of th 
Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship Board, for a value of approximately $80( 

The Charles L. Little Scholarship Fund, established by Charles L. Little, is given t 
upperclass students. Preference is given to pre-medical students from Anson Count 
and immediately adjacent counties in North Carolina who provide satisfactor 
evidence of a willingness to give serious consideration to practicing medicine i 
Wadesboro, or Anson County, North Carolina. 

The Wilma L. McCurdy Memorial Fund Scholarship is awarded on the basis c 
character, academic standing, and need, in the amount of $750 per academic yea 
Application must be made annually. 

The Thane Edward McDonald and Marie Dayton McDonald Memorial Scholarship Fum 
made possible by the late Thane Edward McDonald, professor of music, is availabl 
to a deserving and qualified music student for a value of approximately $125. 

The Robert Lee Middleton Scholarship, donated by Sarah Edwards Middleton c 
Nashville, Tennessee in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of charactei 
purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to the student planning ti 
enter the field of literature, accounting, teaching, or the gospel ministry or othe 
full-time religious work. 

The Mildred Bronson Miller Scholarship Fund, donated by Mildred B. Miller of Atlanta 
Georgia, is awarded to students on the basis of leadership, dedication, com 
petitiveness, and citizenship. 

The Norfleet Scholarships, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Eustace Norfleet of Wilmington 
North Carolina in memory of his parents John A. and Mary Pope Norfleet, an 
available to deserving and promising students needing financial assistance, for ; 



45 

! value of $200. 

3 The North Carolina Scholarships are made available by the North Carolina General 
| Assembly and are awarded on the basis of financial need to full-time students who 
ii are bona fide residents of North Carolina. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grants are available to undergraduate residents 
t of North Carolina with exceptional financial need who require these grants in order 
1 to attend college, for a value of from $200 to $1,500 per year. The amount of assistance 
i a student may receive depends upon need, taking into account financial resources 
\ and the cost of attending the college chosen. 

The Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship, donated by Kate J. Parham of Oxford, 
, North Carolina in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of ability and 
t need and may be renewed for succeeding years. 

1 The Thomas F. Pettus Scholarships, administered by the North Carolina Baptist Foun- 
dation under the terms of the will of the late Thomas F. Pettus of Wilson County, 
v North Carolina, make two or more scholarships available each year in memory of 
' Mr. Pettus and are awarded on the basis of merit and need, with preference given 
i to North Carolina Baptist students. 

* The William Louis Poteat Scholarships, valued at $2,000 per year, are available to eleven 
3 freshmen, one from each Congressional District of North Carolina. To be eligible 
a student must be an active member of a Southern Baptist Church in North Carolina, 
•j must be likely to make a significant contribution to church and society, and must 
1 be appreciative of the quality of education available at Wake Forest University. 
' The A. M. Pullen and Company Scholarship, granted by the A. M. Pullen Company 
t to an outstanding upper division accounting major designated by the accounting 
i faculty on the basis of merit, financial need, and interest in public accounting, has 
i a value of $750. 

i The Kenneth Tyson Raynor Scholarship, donated by friends of the late Kenneth Tyson 
( Raynor, professor of mathematics, is awarded annually by the mathematics and com- 
puter science faculty. The award is made on the basis of academic ability to an 
i individual majoring in mathematics who has achieved junior standing. 

The Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships, donated in memory of Kate B. Reynolds, 
are for residents of Forsyth County, North Carolina who, without financial aid, would 
be unable to obtain education beyond high school. At least four scholarships are 
} awarded, with a value up to $2,400. 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarships, made available by the US 
L Army, are awarded for academic and personal achievement. The four, three, two, 
and one year scholarships, each with an annual value of more than $5,000, cover 
E tuition, fees, books, and classroom materials. A monthly stipend of $100 is a'so given 
■ during the academic year. Recipients must participate in the ROTC program and 
maintain satisfactory academic progress. Four year scholarships must be applied 
for in the junior or senior years of high school. Other scholarships must be applied 
for through the Department of Military Science, Wake Forest University. Some 
preference is given to students of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Two- 
year scholarships for rising juniors are also available on the basis of academic 
accomplishment and outstanding performance at the six-week ROTC Basic Camp. 
The Robert Forest Smith III Scholarship Fund, donated by the Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Robert 



U 



46 

Forest Smith Jr. and other citizens of Hickory, North Carolina in memory of Robe 
Forest Smith III, is awarded to an entering freshman who qualifies on the bas 
of need and on distinction in high school government, with preference given t 
those who plan to enter government service, and with strong preference given t 
students exemplifying positive Christian principles, for a value of $1,000. 

The Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships, donated by the Sigmund Sternberger Four 
dation, are for needy North Carolinians, with preference given to undergradual 
students from Greensboro and Guilford County, for a value of $2,000. 

The J. W. Straughan Scholarship, donated by Mattie, Mable, and Alice Straugha 
in memory of their brother J. W. Straughan of Warsaw, North Carolina, is for thos 
who need financial assistance to continue their education with preference give 
to students from Duplin County, North Carolina who are interested in pursuin 
a medical career, especially in the field of family practice. 

The Saddye Stephenson and, Benjamin Louis Sykes Scholarship, donated by Charles I 
Sykes and Ralph J. Sykes in memory of their mother and father, is awarded o 
the basis of Christian character, academic proficiency, and financial need, witi 
preference given to freshmen from North Carolina, renewable for a value of ap 
proximately $400. 

The Tyner-Pittnan Scholarship Fund, donated by Cora Tyner Pitman, makes availabi 
at least one scholarship for needy North Carolina students. 

The Jesse A. Williams Scholarships, created under the will of the late Jesse A. William 
of Union County, North Carolina, with preference given to deserving students c 
Union County, have a value of up to $1,200. 

The James Bennett Willis Scholarship Fund, established by James B. Willis of Hamlel 
North Carolina, gives preference to North Carolina Baptist students interested ii 
the ministry and Christian education. It is awarded on the basis of need. 

The Maria Thornton and Miriam Carlyle Willis Scholarship Fund, established b 
James B. Willis in memory of his wife and daughter, gives preference to Nort! 
Carolina Baptist students who are interested in all phases of the ministry of music 
It is awarded on the basis of need. 

The Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship, created under the will of Jennie Mayes Wilsoi 
in memory of her husband Charles Littell Wilson, is for a freshman, with a valu 
from $200 to $600. 

The O. W. Wilson-Yancey County Scholarships, created under the will of O. W. Wilsoi 
of Yancey County, North Carolina, are awarded to students from Yancey Count; 
who have excellent academic records and who demonstrate need. 

The William Luther Wyatt HI Scholarship Trust, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Willian 
L. Wyatt Jr. of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of their son William Luther Wyat 
III, with preference given to a male student entering the junior year who has showi 
an interest and an ability in the field of biology, is based on need and ability, fo 
a value of approximately $500. 

Federal Financial Aid Programs 

The Federal Government, through the Department of Education, sponsors fiv< 
programs to help pay college costs. These programs are Pell Grants, Supplementa 



47 

iducational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), College Work/Study, National Direct Stu- 
dent Loans (NDSL), Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL), and Parent Loans for 
Jndergraduate Students (PLUS). To receive assistance through these programs, a 
;tudent must complete the necessary applications, meet basic eligibility requirements, 
ind maintain satisfactory academic progress. (See the statement in bold face on page 
[8.) The five programs are outlined as follows: 

Pell Grants are federal funds awarded to undergraduate students with exceptional 
inancial need who require these grants to attend college, for a value of from $135 
o $1,800 per year. The amount of assistance a student may receive depends upon 
leed, taking into account financial resources and the cost of attending the college 
hosen. 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number 
if undergraduate students with exceptional financial need who require these grants 
jo attend college and who show academic or creative promise, for a value from $200 
"o $2,000 a year. The amount of financial assistance a student may receive depends 
ipon need, taking into account financial resources and the cost of attending the 
'ollege chosen. 

The College Work/Study Program makes on-campus employment available to students 
vho show evidence of financial need. Students work during the academic year for 
ampus minimum wage or above, at an average of ten to fifteen hours per week 
a the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Reynolda Hall, College Union, Reynolda Gardens, 
nd other places on campus. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 per 
^ear for students in need of financial assistance with an interest rate of 5 percent. 
jTiese are examples of typical repayment schedules: 



•egate Loan 


Quarterly 


Amount of 


Total Interest 


Total 




Payments 


Payment 


Paid 


Payment 


$2,500 


35 


$ 90.00 


$ 590.22 


$3,090.22 


5,000 


40 


159.61 


1,384.27 


6,384.27 


7,500 


40 


239.41 


2,076.44 


9,576.44 



Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $3,000 for the first two years or 
6,000 for four years, but may be extended to $12,000 for those who also borrow 
Dr graduate or professional study, with an interest rate of 5 percent. 

The Guaranteed Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 for 
ndergraduate students. Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $12,000, 
ut may be extended to $25,000 for those who also borrow for graduate or profes- 
ional study. The maximum loan per year for graduate students is $5,000. Loans 
re insured by the federal government or guaranteed by a state or private non-profit 
uarantee agency. The federal government pays the 9 percent interest during in- 
chool and grace periods. Application and information may be obtained from state 
uarantee agencies or from the appropriate regional office of the United States Of- 
ce of Education. 

The North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,000 
er year for legal residents enrolled full-time. Aggregate undergraduate sums may 



V 



48 

not exceed $12,000, but may be extended to $25,000 for those who also borrow for 
graduate or professional study. The maximum loan each year may not exceed $2,500 
for undergraduates or $5,000 for graduate or professional students. Loans are in- 
sured by the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority and are processed 
by the College Foundation. Under certain conditions the United States Office of 
Education pays the 9 percent interest during the in-school and grace periods. 

Financial aid under the Federal Title IV Program is available to eligible students 
enrolled in a course of study leading to a degree. The normal time in which the 
course should be completed is four years. Federal regulations specify that the stu- 
dent maintain satisfactory progress in order to receive federal financial aid. Satisfac- 
tory progress is defined as meeting the University's minimum academic re- 
quirements for continuation outlined as follows: On the basis of cumulative records 
at the end of the spring semester, students are academically ineligible to enroll 
for the following fall (1) who have attempted fewer than 54 credits with a grade 
point average less than 1.35, (2) who have attempted as many as 54 but fewer than 
98 credits with a grade point average of less than 1.65, (3) who have atempted as 
many as 98 but fewer than 135 credits with a grade point average of less than 1.85, 
or (4) who have atempted 135 credits with a grade point average of less than 1.90. 
Students who do not meet the minimum requirements at the end of the spring 
semester may be allowed to continue with the permission of the Committee on 
Academic Affairs. Such students may be granted federal financial aid for a period 
of one additional semester. Failure to bring the grade point average to the stated 
minimum will result in termination of all federal financial aid. 



Exchange Scholarships 

The German Exchange Scholarship, established in 1959 with the Free University of 
Berlin, is available to a student with at least two years of college German or the 
equivalent who has junior standing by the end of the semester in which application 
is made, but who need not be a German major. It provides 750 German marks per 
month for ten months, remission of fees, 200 marks per semester for books, and 
250 marks per month for rent. (Interested students should communicate with the 
chairman of the Department of German.) 

The Spanish Exchange Scholarship, established in 1964 with the University of the 
Andes in Bogota, Colombia, is available to two students for one semester's study 
each or one student for two semesters with at least two years of college Spanish 
or the equivalent. It provides remission of fees, cost of books, and the cost of board 
and accomodations. (Interested students should communicate with the chairwoman 
of the Department of Romance Languages.) 

The French Exchange Scholarship, established in 1971 with the University of Orleans, 
France, is available to a graduating senior, who receives a graduate teaching assistant- 
ship at the University of Orleans for two semesters. (Interested students should 
communicate with the chairwoman of the Department of Romance Languages.) 



49 



Loans 



i The James F and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Student Loan Plan is for residents of North 
3 Carolina enrolled for full-time for a value of up to $7,500 for undergraduate study. 
j The amount of each loan is determined by the College Foundation, with an interest 

rate of 1 percent during the in-school and grace periods and 7 percent during the 

repayment period. 
ij The Bushnell Baptist Church Loan Fund, established in 1945 with funds supplied 
), by the Bushnell Baptist Church of Fontana Dam, North Carolina, is for needy 
i students. 

■j The Council Fund, established in 1935 by C. T. Council of Durham, North Carolina, 
'. is for the aid of senior students. 

i! The James W. Denmark Loan Fund, originated in 1875 by James William Denmark 
1! of Dudley, North Carolina, is available to qualified students, with preference given 
i to students from North Carolina, for an amount not exceeding $1,500 each year and 
I $6,000 during the entire period of enrollment. 

i,i The Olivia Dunn Student Loan Fund, established under the will of Birdie Dunn of 
t Wake County, North Carolina in memory of her mother, is for needy students. 
( The Duplin County Loan Fund, donated in 1942 by anonymous friends of the College, 
I is limited to students from Duplin County, North Carolina. 
i The Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund, established by the Board of Trustees, is a 
a memorial to the former bursar, 
i The Friendly Student Loan Fund, established in 1948 by Nell E. Stinson of Raleigh, 

North Carolina in memory of her sister Mary Belle Stinson Michael, is for the benefit 

of worthy students who need financial aid. 
The George Foster Hankins Loan Fund, established under the will of George Foster 

Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina, gives preference to applicants from Davidson 

County, North Carolina. 
The Harris Memorial Loan Fund, established by the late J. P. Harris of Bethel, North 
t Carolina in memory of his first wife Lucy Shearon Harris and his second wife Lucy 
i Jones Harris, is for students who have demonstrated ability to apply educational 
r advantages to the rendition of enriched and greater Christian service in life and 
r who require financial assistance to prevent the disruption of their education. 

The Edna Tyner Langston Fund, established in 1942 by Henry J. Langston of Danville, 
m Virginia in memory of his wife, is available to a student agreed upon by the donor 

and the College. 
I The Watts Norton Loan Fund, established in 1949 by L. Watts Norton of Durham, 

North Carolina, is for worthy students enrolled in the Department of Religion who 

need financial assistance. 
; The Powers Fund, established in 1944 by Frank P. Powers of Raleigh, North Carolina 

in memory of his parents Frank P. and Effie Reade Powers, is for the benefit of needy 

students, with preference given to orphans. 
The Grover and. Addy Raby Loan Fund, established in 1945 by J. G. Raby of Tarboro, 

North Carolina in memory of his parents, gives preference to applicants from the 

First Baptist Church of Tarboro. 
The James F Slate Loan Fund, established in 1908 by J. F. Slate of Stokes County, 



V 



50 

North Carolina, is available for ministerial students who have been licensed to 
preach. 

Concessions 

North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants. The North Carolina General Assembly 
provides yearly grants to all legal residents of North Carolina. To be eligible a stu- 
dent must be enrolled for at least fourteen credits each semester (by the tenth day 
of classes) and complete a Residency Form 100. The student must not have receiv- 
ed a bachelor's degree previously. To receive the grant, the student must also com- 
plete an NCLTG application and return it to the financial aid office. 

Ministerial students receive an $800 concession per year if they (1) have a written 
recommendation or license to preach from their own church body and (2) agree 
to repay the total amount, plus 4 percent interest, in the event that they do not 
serve five years in the pastoral ministry within twelve years of attendance in the 
College. 

Children and spouses of pastors of North Carolina Baptist churches receive an $800 con- 
cession per year if they are the children or spouses of (1) ministers, (2) missionaries 
of the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board, (3) officials of the Baptist State Con- 
vention of North Carolina, or (4) professors in North Carolina Baptist colleges or 
universities who are ordained ministers. Pastors themselves are also eligible. 

Children of other ministers who are not eligible for the above concession receive 
a $150 concession per year if their parent makes a living chiefly by the ministry 
and they have a demonstrated need. 

Other Financial Aid 

Church Choir Work Grants, given by the College and Wake Forest Baptist Church 
to encourage outstanding music students, are awarded on the basis of talent, reliabili- 
ty, and interest in the church on the recommendation of the music committee of 
the church and the Department of Music, for the value of $300. (Interested students 
should communicate with the chairwoman of the Department of Music.) 

The Ministerial Aid Fund, established in 1897 by the estate of J. A. Melke, is available 
to pre-ministerial students on a loan or grant program on the basis of merit and 
need, and, particularly in the case of grants, academic achievement. 

Student/Student Spouse Employment is possible for part-time, on-campus and off- 
campus work, for a recommended maximum of twenty hours per week for full- 
time students. Summer employment may also be available. (Interested students 
should communicate with the Office of Placement and Career Development.) 

Veterans' Benefits are administered by the Office of the Veterans Administration 
in the Federal Building at 251 North Main Street in Winston-Salem. Records of pro- 
gress are kept by this institution on veteran and non-veteran alike. Progress records 
are furnished the students, veterans and non-veterans alike, at the end of each 
scheduled school term. 






51 

Special Programs 



For students of special ability or interest and for students who can take advantage 
of off-campus study opportunities, the College offers a variety of programs. These 
are in addition to combined courses of study in departments in the College and 
the pre-professional curricula described in this bulletin. 



Honors Study 

For highly qualified students, a series of interdisciplinary honors courses is describ- 
ed under Courses of Instruction. Under the supervision of the coordinator of the honors 
program, students participate in three or more honors seminars during the freshman, 
sophomore, and junior years. Those who complete four seminars with a superior 
record and who are not candidates for departmental honors may complete a final 
directed study course. With a superior record in that course and a grade point average 
of 3.0 in all work, a student may be graduated with "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

For students especially talented in individual areas of study, most departments 
in the College offer special studies leading to graduation with honors in a particular 
discipline. The minimum requirement is a grade point average of 3.0 in all work 
and 3.3 (or higher in some areas) in the major. Other course, seminar, and research 
requirements vary according to the department concerned. 

Open Curriculum 

For students with high motivation and strong academic preparation, the Open 
Curriculum provides the opportunity to follow a course of study planned within 
the framework of a liberal arts education but not necessarily fulfilling all basic and 
divisional requirements for the degree. Under the Committee on Open Curriculum 
a limited number of students is selected before or during the freshman year by 
previous record of achievement, high aspirations, ability in one or more areas of 
study, strength of self-expression, and other special talents. The course of study 
for the degree is designed by the student and his or her adviser. 

Residential Language Centers 

For students prepared to speak French, German, Italian, or Spanish on a regular 
basis with other students studying the same language, the Lovette House (Romance 
languages) and The Red Farm House (German) are the sites of residential language 
centers coordinated by members of the Romance languages and German depart- 
ments. Such students attend regular classes on the campus. 

Foreign Area Studies 

The Foreign Area Studies program enables students who wish to do so to choose 
an interdisciplinary concentration in the language and culture of a foreign area. For 
a full description of these programs, see page 59. 



52 

Study at Salem College 

For full-time students, Wake Forest and Salem College share a program of exchange 
credits for courses taken at one institution because they are not offered at the other. 
An application must be approved by the academic adviser and the dean of the Col- 
lege or the dean of the School of Business and Accountancy. Except in courses of 
private instruction, there is no additional cost to the student. Grades and grade 
points earned at Salem College are evaluated as if they were earned at Wake Forest. 



Opportunities for Study Abroad 

London 

A program of study is offered each semester at Worrell House, the University's 
residential center near Regent's Park in London. Courses typically encompass aspects 
of the art, theatre, literature, and history of London and Great Britain. (See, for 
example, Art 2320: English Art, Hogarth to the Present, and History 2260: History of 
London, in the course listings of those departments.) Each term a different member 
of the faculty serves as the director of the program, which accommodates sixteen 
students. Further information may be obtained in the office of the provost. 

Venice 

For students wishing to spend a semester in Italy, a program of study is available 
at Casa Artom, the University's residential center on the Grand Canal in Venice. 
Under various members of the faculty, approximately twenty students focus on the 
heritage and culture of Venice and Italy. (Courses offered usually include Art 2693: 
Venetian Renaissance Art, Italian 2213: Spoken Italian, and other courses offered by 
the faculty member serving as director.) Students selected for the Venice program 
are normally required to have completed elementary training in Italian. Limited 
scholarship aid is available to one or two students each semester to assist with ex- 
penses. Further information may be obtained in the office of the provost. 

France 

For students wishing to study in France, arrangements are made for a semester's 
instruction at the University of Dijon. Under a faculty residential adviser from the 
Department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of Dijon 
by student groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in French is not required, 
but French 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

Spain 

For students wishing to study in Spain, arrangements are made for a semester's 
instruction at the University of Salamanca. Under a faculty residential adviser from 
the Department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of 



53 

Salamanca by student groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in Spanish 
is not required, but Spanish 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

India 

For students who can spend a semester in India, arrangements are made for in- 
struction in an Indian college or university and travel in the country for a period 
of about three months. (Written approval from the dean of the College is necessary 
for fulfilling basic, divisional, or major requirements.) 

Independent Study 

For students who wish to spend one or more semesters in an approved college 
or university abroad, arrangements must be made with the head of the department 
of the major and the dean of the College. An approved application for study abroad 
must also be filed with the registrar. Up to thirty-six credits for a full-year program 
may be granted by the College upon satisfactory evaluation of the work taken, but 
this credit is not guaranteed. Students not on a College program must apply for 
readmission to the University. Credit is computed as transfer credit at 3.375 credits 
for three approved semester hours taken abroad. 

In addition, the Independent Study Program of the Experiment in International 
Living is recognized by the College. To participate in this program a student must 
be regularly enrolled and plan to return to the College after study abroad, and 
arrangements must be made with the chairperson of the department of the major 
and the dean of the College. Up to fourteen credits for a one-semester program 
may be granted upon evidence of satisfactory completion of work taken, but this 
is subject to evaluation by the dean of the College. 




54 

Requirements for Degrees 

Degrees Offered 

The College offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred with a major 
in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, classical studies, economics, English, French, 
French-Spanish, German, Greek, history, Latin, music, philosophy, physics, politics, 
psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, or speech communication and theatre arts. 
The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred with a major in chemistry, mathematical 
economics, mathematics, physical education, or physics. The Bachelor of Arts degree 
is available with a major in intermediate education or education with a state teacher's 
certificate in social studies, and the Bachelor of Science degree is available with a 
major in education with a state teacher's certificate in science. The Bachelor of Science 
degree may be conferred in combined curricula in dentistry, engineering, forestry 
and environmental studies, medical sciences, medical technology, and the physician 
assistant program. The School of Business and Accountancy offers undergraduate 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in accountancy 
or business. (See page 164 of this Bulletin.) 

A student who receives the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree may 
not thereafter receive the other of the two degrees. 

General Requirements 

Students in the College have considerable flexibility in planning their course of 
study. Except for two semesters of required physical education, only three specific 
courses are required, one in English composition and two in a foreign language. 
To complete preparation for more specialized work in a major field or fields, students 
select three courses in each of four divisions of the undergraduate curriculum: 
(1) literature and the arts; (2) the natural sciences and mathematics; (3) history, 
religion, and philosophy; and (4) the social and behavioral sciences. Normally the 
basic and divisional requirements are completed in the freshman and sophomore 
years and the requirements in the field or fields of the major are completed in the 
junior and senior years. 

All students must complete (1) the basic and divisional requirements (unless 
accepted for the Open Curriculum), (2) a course of study approved by the depart- 
ment or departments of the major, and (3) elective courses for a total of 144 credits. 
No more than 16 credits toward graduation may be earned from among all of the 
following courses: Education 353; all military science courses; Music 111-123 (ensem- 
ble courses); and elective 100-level courses in physical education. 

All students must earn a C average on all work attempted at all colleges and univer- 
sities. Of the 144 credits required for graduation, at least 72 must be completed in 
the undergraduate schools of Wake Forest University, including the work of the senior 
year (except for combined degree curricula). 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the requirements of the bulletin 
of the year in which he or she enters, provided that course work is completed within 



55 

six years of entrance. After six years, the student must fulfill the requirements for 
the class in which he or she graduates. 

Basic Requirements 

All students must complete three required basic courses (unless waived through 
procedures established by the departments concerned): 
English 110 (composition) or 112 (composition and literature) 
Foreign language 153 (intermediate level) 
Foreign language (literature) 

French 213, 214, 216, 217, or the equivalent 

Spanish 215, 216, or the equivalent 

Italian 215, 216, or the equivalent 

German 211 or 212 

Russian (any literature course) 

Greek 211 or 212 

Latin 211, 212, or 216 

Hebrew 211 

Hindi 211 
No credit is given for any language course below the one recommended by the 
department on the basis of the placement test unless the student is given permission 
to earn such credit by the Language Placement Appeals Board. 

Divisional Requirements 

c All students must complete three courses in each of the four divisions of the 
1 undergraduate curriculum (unless exempted by completion of advanced placement 
-requirements): 

3 

^Division I. Literature and the Arts (three courses; no more than one course from 

b any one of the four groups) 

y 1. English literature (English 160 or 165) 

2. American literature (English 170 or 175) 

3. Foreign literature (other than the one used for the basic 
requirement) 

— Classical languages 
Greek 211, 212, 231, 241, or 242 
Latin 211, 212, 216, 221, 225, or 226 
Classics 253, 254, 263, 264, 265, or 272 

— German 211 or 212 

— Romance languages (French, Italian, Spanish, or Russian 
literature) 

— Humanities 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 373, 374, 375, or 378 

4. Fine Arts 

— Art 103 or 111 

— Music 101, 102, 181, or 182 

— Theatre Arts 121 



1/ 



56 



Division II. The Natural Sciences and Mathematics three courses, selected from two 
of the four groups) 

1. Biology 111, 150, or 151 

2. Chemistry 111, 112 (unless advanced preparation indicates a higher 
course) 

3. Physics 101, 111, 112, 121, 122 

4. Mathematics 108, 109, 111, 112, 117 (any one; if two, the pair must 
include 108 or 111 but not both) 

Division III. History, Religion, and Philosophy (three courses; no more than one course 
from each group) 

1. History 101 or 102 

2. Religion (any 100-level course) 

3. Philosophy 111, 171, or 172 

Division IV. The Social and Behavioral Sciences (three courses, no more than one from 
any one department) 

1. Anthropology 151 or 152 

2. Economics 111, or 152 (Note that 151 is prerequisite for 152.) 

3. Politics 113, 114, or 115 

4. Psychology 151 

5. Sociology 151 

Requirement in Physical Education 

All students must complete Physical Education 111 and one additional course 
selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The requirement must 
be met before enrollment in additional physical education elective courses, and in 
any case before the end of the second year. 

Proficiency in the Use of English 

Proficiency in the use of the English language is recognized by the faculty as a 
requirement in all departments. A composition condition, indicated by cc under the 
grade for any course, may be assigned in any department to a student whose writing 
is unsatisfactory, regardless of previous credits in composition. The writing of transfer 
students is checked during the orientation period each term, and students whose 
writing is deficient are given a composition condition. For removal of a composition 
condition the student is required to take English 11 during the first semester for which 
he or she registers following the assignment of the cc. Removal of the deficiency 
is prerequisite to graduation. 



Basic and Divisional Requirements 

The basic and divisional requirements are intended to introduce the student to 
various fields of knowledge and to lay the foundation for concentration in a major 
subject and related fields during the junior and senior years. For these reasons, 
as many of the requirements as feasible should be taken in the freshman and 
sophomore years. 



57 

No course requirements may be set aside or replaced by substitutes except through 
regular procedures already established by the faculty, or through a specific vote of 
the faculty in regular session. 

Declaring a Major 

To enter upon a major a student should have attained at least sixty credits. The 

normal time for reaching this point is the end of the second semester of the 

sophomore year. Thirty days before the end of the sophomore year each student 

who will have attained the requisite credits by the end of the semester or the end 

of the summer school is required to indicate to the registrar and to the department 

or departments concerned the selection of a major for concentration during the junior 

and senior years. Before this selection is recorded by the registrar, the student must 

present a written statement from the authorized representative of the department 

or departments indicating that the student has been accepted as a candidate for 

: the major in that department. An adviser is available to assist the student in plan- 

: ning a course of study for the junior and senior years. A department which rejects 

i a student as a major must file with the dean of the College a written statement 

indicating the reason(s) for the rejection. 

If thirty days before the end of the sophomore year a student sees that he or she 
will begin the fifth semester without attaining sixty credits, he or she should con- 
sult the registrar's office about the proper course to follow. 

A student wishing to major in business or in accountancy should make applica- 
tion to the School of Business and Accountancy. (See page 164 of this bulletin.) 

The undergraduate schools make a reasonable effort to provide ample space in 
the various major fields to accommodate the interests of students. It must be 
understood, however, that the undergraduate schools cannot undertake to guarantee 
the availability of space in a given major field or a given course, since the preferences 
of students change and there are limits to both faculty and facilities. 

After the beginning of the junior year a student may not change from one major 
to another without the approval of the departments concerned. The student's course 
of study for the junior and senior years includes the minimum requirements for 
the departmental major, with other courses selected by the student and approved 
by the adviser. 

At least half of the major must be completed at Wake Forest University. 

Students preparing for the ministry need not major in religion but are advised 
to elect three courses in religion beyond the course included in the divisional 
requirements. 

The following fields of study are recognized for the major: accountancy, an- 
thropology, art, biology, business, chemistry, classical studies, economics, educa- 
tion, English, French, French-Spanish, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematical 
economics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physical education, physics, politics, 
psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, and speech communication and theatre arts. 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 

Within the College, a maximum of 48 credits in a single field of study is allowed 
within the 144 credits required for graduation. Fifty-six credits toward graduation 



P 



58 

are allowed in any department authorized to offer two fields of study or more. 
These stipulations exclude required related courses from other departments. They 
further exclude, for students majoring in English, English 110 and 112; for students 
majoring in mathematics and minoring in computer science, Mathematics 111 and 
112; and, for students majoring in a foreign language, elementary courses in that 
language. These limits may be exceeded in unusual circumstances only by action 
of the dean of the College. 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 

For purposes of satisfying graduation requirements a student must select one, 
and only one, of the following options which will receive official recognition on 
a student's permanent record: (1) a single major, (2) a joint major, (3) a single major 
and a minor, (4) a double major. In addition to the options above, a student may complete 
the requirements of a foreign area studies program. 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 

A student may major in two departments in the College with the written per- 
mission of the chairperson of each of the departments and on condition that the 
student meet all requirements for the major in both departments. For administrative 
purposes, the student must designate one of the two fields as the primary major, 
which appears first on the student's record. 

A joint major consisting of fifty-six credits in two fields of study is available in 
classical studies, in mathematical economics, and in French-Spanish. 

Minors 

A minor is not required. Those students, however, who select a single major- 
not those working toward a double or joint major— may choose a minor field from 
among the following: anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, computer science, 
educational studies, professional education, English, French language and culture, 
French literature, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematics, music, philosophy, 
physical education, physics, politics, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish 
language and culture, Hispanic literature, and speech communication and theatre 
arts. 

For details of the various minors, see the appropriate departmental headings in 
the section of this bulletin that lists course offerings. 

Interdisciplinary Minors 

A Minor in Cultural Resources Preservation. The Departments of Anthropology, Art, 
History, and Sociology offer an interdisciplinary minor in cultural resource 
preservation (CRP) which will give students preliminary training in the field of 
historic preservation and cultural resource management aiming at the protection 
and enhancement of archeological, historical, and architectural resources. 

The minor requires the following twenty credits: Anthropology 310, Museum Design 
and Operation; Anthropology 361, Conservation Archeology; Art 223, American 



59 

Architecture; History 366, Studies in Historic Preservation; and Sociology 333, The Urban 
Community. It is recommended but not required that students take some of the 
following courses: Anthropology 151, General Anthropology I: Archeology and Human 
Evolution (may count as a Division IV requirement); Sociology 151, Principles of 
Sociology (may count as a Division IV requirement); Anthropology 356, Old World 
Prehistory; Anthropology 359, Prehistory of North America; Art 294, Modern Architecture; 
Art 393, Practicum; Anthropology 261, Museum Practicum; and History 398, Individual 
Study. Students should consult the adviser for the minor in CRP before declaring 
such a minor. Students are strongly advised to declare their intention to minor in 
cultural resource preservation during the first semester of their junior year. Successful 
completion of the minor in cultural resource preservation will be noted on the 
student's transcript. 
i 

A Minor in Women's Studies. The interdisciplinary minor in women's studies requires 

a core course (Humanities 121) and five other courses. At least two of the five courses 

must be in the humanities and two must be in the social sciences, and the courses 

must be distributed among at least three departments, for a total of twenty-four 

credits. It is recommended that one of these courses be the upper division seminar, 

Humanities 321. This structure gives students an understanding of the 

' interdisciplinary nature of women's studies within the context of the traditional liberal 

' arts curriculum. A student minoring in women's studies might take Humanities 

121 as a sophomore, one humanities and one social science course as a junior, and 

Humanities 321, another humanities course, and another social science course as 

1 a senior. 

The following courses may be included in the minor: 

Humanities: Art 251, Women and Art; Classics 252, Women in Antiquity; English 
340, Women and Literature; English 376, American Poetry from 1855 to 1900; History 
365, Women in American History; Religion 334B, Feminist Theology; Speech 
, Communication and Theatre Arts 357, The Rhetoric of the Women's Movement. 

Social Sciences: Psychology 265, Human Sexuality; Psychology 270L, Sex 
f Stereotypes and Roles; Psychology 358, Psychology of Woman; Sociology 248, 

Marriage and the Family; Sociology 305, Male and Female Roles in Society; Sociology 
j 309, Sex and Human Relationships; Sociology 311, Women in Professions. 

Students intending to minor in women's studies should consult the adviser 
appointed from one of the participating departments and listed with the registrar. 
Students are strongly urged to consult the adviser during the sophomore year. 
Successful completion of the minor in women's studies will be noted on the stu- 
dent's transcript. 

Foreign Area Studies 

d The foreign area studies programs enable students to choose an interdisciplinary 
concentration in the language and culture of a foreign area. An area studies 
concentration may include courses in the major and also in the minor field, if a 
minor is chosen. Foreign area studies do not replace majors or minors; they may 
supplement either or both. A faculty adviser coordinates each foreign area studies 



// 



60 

program and advises interested students. Further questions may be directed to the 
coordinator of international studies. These programs are currently available: 
East European Studies. Coordinator, Carl Moses (politics) 
Russian 215 is required plus twenty-four credits from the following: Russian 
216, History 331, History 332, Politics 232, Economics 255, Anthropology 371, 
Humanities 215, and seminars, colloquia, or independent studies in one of the 
departments above. 

German Studies. Coordinator, Donald Schoonmaker (politics) 
Twelve or thirteen credits from German 153, 211, 212, 217, or 220 are required. 
In addition, the student should take four courses from the following groups, 
at least one from each group: (1) History 320 and History/German 231; (2) Politics 
233 and 273; (3) Philosophy 241 and 242. Appropriate credit in the above areas 
could be satisfied by study abroad in Germany. 
Italian Studies. Coordinator, Bianca Artom (Romance languages) 
Italian through the 215 level is required, plus three courses from the following 
groups, at least one each from 2 and 3. (1) Literature: Italian 216, Classics 251, 
Classics 272, and Religion 277; (2) Fine Arts: Art 245, 267, 268, 296C, and 2693., 
and Music 181, 201, 206, 220, and 221; (3) History and the Social Sciences: 
Classics 271, History 221, 222, 223, and 398. A semester in Venice or another 
approved course of study in Italy is also required. 

Latin American Studies. Coordinator, Gregorio Martin (Romance languages) 
History 271, Politics 236, and Spanish 216 and 223 are required, plus twelve 
credits from the following: Anthropology 305, Anthropology 342, Economics 
252, Politics 235, Spanish 219, 221, and 229. Students are asked to take either 
Spanish 227, 265, or 266 to fulfill the foreign literature requirement in Division 
I and are strongly urged to spend a semester studying in Latin America. 
Spanish Studies. Coordinator, Kathleen Glenn (Romance languages) 
History 2019, Sociology 2029, Spanish 215, and Spanish 224 are required plus 
twelve credits from the advanced courses in Spanish language and literature 
offered by the Department of Romance Languages or from the courses offered 
at the University of Salamanca (currently these include Spanish 1829, 2059, 2259, 
2749, and Art 2029.) Students are required to participate in the semester in Spain 
program at Salamanca and are strongly urged to live at the Lovette House for 
at least one semester. 

Senior Testing 

All seniors are required to participate in a testing program designed to provide 
objective evidence of educational development and employing measures of academic 
achievement such as selected portions of the Graduate Record Examination and 
other tests deemed appropriate by the Committee on Academic Affairs. The tests 
are administered during the spring semester, and relevant results are made available 
to the student for his or her information. The primary purpose of the program is 
to provide the University with information for assessing the total educational process. 
The program does not supplant the regular administration of the Graduate Record 
Examination for students applying for admission to graduate school. 



61 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for the student to receive the two degrees 
of Bachelor of Arts and Juris Doctor in six academic years or their equivalent instead 
of the usual seven years. The first three years of the combined course are in the 
College and the last three are in the School of Law. 

A student pursuing this plan must (1) complete the basic and divisional course 
requirements and become qualified for admission to the upper division; (2) initiate 
an application for admission to the School of Law and secure through the law school 
adviser, who is a member of the law faculty, permission to pursue the combined 
course plan; (3) perform the junior year of study in the College under the supervision 
of a departmental academic adviser and the law school adviser; and (4) complete 
at least 110 credits in the College with a minimum average of C and the first full 
year of law in the School of Law with an average sufficient to remain in the School 
of Law. (Admission to the School of Law is based on the applicant's entire 
undergraduate record, Law School Admission Test scores, and other criteria, and 
permission to pursue the combined degree program does not constitute admission 
to the School of Law.) 

The last year of required college academic work must be taken in the College. 
A student who transfers from another college or university at the end of the first 
or second year must maintain a minimum average of C on all academic work under- 
taken in the College. 

A student who completes the program successfully is eligible to receive the 
Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of the first full year in the School of Law; the 
Juris Doctor degree is awarded to the student who, having received the Bachelor 
of Arts degree, also fulfills requirements for the Juris Doctor degree. The quantitative 
and qualitative academic requirements set forth here are minimum requirements 
for the successful completion of the combined degree program; satisfying the re- 
quirements of the three-year program in the College does not necessarily entitle 
an applicant to admission to the School of Law. 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 

A limited number of students may receive a Bachelor of Science degree with a 
major in medical sciences. 

' Under this plan the student fulfills the requirements for the degree by completing 
three years of work in the College with a minimum average grade of C and by 
satisfactorily completing the first full year of medicine (at least thirty semester hours) 
: as outlined by the faculty of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, with a record 
j entitling promotion to the second year class. (Under current scheduling, successful 
candidates receive the baccalaureate degree in August rather than in May.) At least 
one year (thirty-six credits) of the required academic work must be completed in 
the College. 

Before entering the School of Medicine for the fourth year of work, candidates 
for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in medical sciences must complete 
the basic course requirements; the divisional course requirements in Divisions I, 



// 



62 

III, and IV; the physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 (any two 
courses); Biology 312, 320, 321, 326, 351, 360, 370 (any two courses); Chemistry 111 
and 112; Chemistry 221 and 222; Physics 111 and 112; mathematics (one course); 
and electives for a total of 108 credits. 

The completion of the prescribed academic subjects does not necessarily entitle 
an applicant to admission to the School of Medicine. (All other factors being equal, 
applicants who have done all their work in the College are given preference.) 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology 
by completion of the academic requirements outlined in the following paragraph 
and by satisfactory completion of the full program in medical technology offered 
by the Division of Allied Health Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 
A grade of at least C is required in all courses taken in the program in medical 
technology. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of the required academic work musi 
be completed in the College. (Under current scheduling, successful candidates 
receive the baccalaureate degree in August rather than in May.) 

Students seeking admission to the program must file application in the fall oi 
their junior year with the division of Allied Health Programs of the School ol 
Medicine. Students are selected based upon recommendations of teachers, college 
academic record, Allied Health Professions Admissions Test score, impressions made 
in personal interviews, and work experience (not essential, but important). Students 
must complete the basic course requirements; the divisional course requirements 
in Divisions I, III, and IV; the physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 
(three courses or equivalents); Biology 326; Chemistry 111, 112, 221, and 222, 
mathematics (one course); and electives for a total of 108 credits. Desirable elective; 
outside the area of chemistry and biology include physics, data processing, anc 
personnel and management courses. (Interested students should consult a biolog) 
department faculty member during the freshman year for further information.) 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in the physician assistan 
program by completion of three years (108 credits) in the College with a minimurr 
average grade of C, and by satisfactory completion of the full twenty-four montl 
course in the physician assistant program offered by the Division of Allied Healtl 
Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-si: 
credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidate: 
for the degree must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional cours* 
requirements, and the physical education requirement; at least four courses in biolog} 
(including one course in microbiology); and at least four courses in the social science: 
(sociology, psychology, and economics) are recommended. A course in statistic: 
and three or four courses in chemistry are also recommended. Applicants to thi 
program must have a minimum of six months clinical experience in patient can 
services. (Interested students should consult a biology department faculty membe 
during the freshman year for further information.) 



63 

Degrees in Microbiology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in microbiology by 
completion of three years (112 credits) in the College with a minimum average grade 
of C, and by satisfactory completion of a thirty-two hour major in microbiology in 
the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of the 
required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates for the degree 
must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course requirements, 
and the physical education requirement; Microbiology 302, 304 (or Biology 362), 
462, and Biology 370, including laboratory (Biology 371); additional courses to 
complete the major will be selected from Microbiology 401, 403, 407, 408, 415, 416, 
417, 418, 431, 432, 433, 434, Biology 321, 348, 360, 373, and 391, 392. Required related 
courses are two courses in physics and at least two courses in organic chemistry. 
Additional chemistry and mathematics courses may be suggested by the major 
adviser for students progressing toward advanced work in microbiology. The stu- 
dent should consult the microbiology adviser during the sophomore year to establish 
a program of study. Work on the major must begin no later than the fall semester 
of the junior year. 

Degrees in Dentistry 

A student may fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with 
a major in dentistry by completing three years of work in the College with a minimum 
average grade of C, and by satisfactorily completing the first two years of work in 
one of certain approved dental schools designated by the University, with a record 
entitling advancement to the third year class. 

For this degree the requirements in the College are the same as those for the degree 
with a major in medical sciences. 



Degrees in Engineering 

The College cooperates with North Carolina State University and other engineering 
schools in offering a broad course of study in the arts and sciences combined with 
specialized training in engineering. A program for outstanding students covers five 
years of study, including three initial years in the College and approximately two 
years in one of the schools of engineering. (Depending upon the field chosen, it 
may be advisable for a student to attend the summer session in the engineering 
school after transfer.) Admission to Wake Forest does not guarantee admission to 
the engineering school. Those decisions are based on the student's transcript, 
performance, and status at the time of application. Upon successful completion of 
the five years of study, the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science from 
the University and the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the specialized 
engineering fields from the engineering school. 

The curriculum for the first three years must include the basic and divisional 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Suggested courses for the freshman 
year are English 110 and 160 (or a foreign literature); foreign language courses 211, 



// 



64 



215, or 216; Mathematics 111, 112; Physics 121, 122; and Physical Education 111, 112 
Suggested courses for the sophomore year are English 170 (or a foreign literature) 
Philosophy 111; Mathematics 113 or 251; Physics 141, 161, and 162; and Chemistn 
111, 112. Suggested courses for the junior year are a history course, a religion course 
Mathematics 311, and Economics 151, 152. 

This rigorous curriculum demands special aptitude in science and mathematics 
Electives are chosen in consultation with the chairman of the Department of Physics 



Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 

The College cooperates with the Duke University School of Forestry am 
Environmental Studies to offer students interested in these areas the possibility o 
earning both bachelor's and master's degrees within five years. For details abou 
the program students should consult a faculty member in the biology department 




65 

Courses of Instruction 



Plans of study, course descriptions, and the identification of instructors apply to the academic 
year 1983-84, unless otherwise noted, and reflect official faculty action through March 19, 

. 1984. 

The University reserves the right to change programs of study, academic requirements, 
assignment of lecturers, or the announced calendar without prior notice. 

Odd-numbered courses are normally taught in the fall, even-numbered in the 
spring. Exceptions are noted after course descriptions. Number of credits is shown 
by numerals immediately after the course title— for example, (3) or (3, 3). The sym- 

i bols P— and C— followed by course numbers or titles are used to show prerequisites 
and corequisites for a course. 

( Courses 101-199 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses 200-299 are 

i primarily for juniors and seniors; courses 301-399 are for advanced undergraduates 
and graduate students. (Other graduate courses are described in the Bulletin of the 
Graduate School; a complete listing of summer courses is in the Bulletin of the Sum- 
mer Session.) 

Anthropology 

J. Ned Woodall, Chairman 
Professors E. Pendleton Banks, Stanton K. Tefft, J. Ned Woodall 

Associate Professors David K. Evans, David S. Weaver 

Assistant Professor/Curator, Museum of Man, Linda B. Robertson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Jay R. Kaplan 

Research Associate/Instructor Ben P. Robertson 

A major in anthropology requires a minimum of thirty-six credits and must in- 
clude Anthropology 151, 152, 340, 380, 388, and either 356 or 359. 

Students are encouraged but not required to enroll in a course offering intensive 
field research training. However, only four credits from Anthropology 381, 382 and 
four credits from Anthropology 383, 384 may be used to meet major requirements. 
Additional courses are counted within the limits specified for a single field of study. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in anthropology courses is required at the 
time the major is declared. A rrtinimum grade point average of 2.0 in all anthropology 
courses is required for graduation. 

A minor in anthropology requires twenty-four credits and must include An- 
thropology 151, 152, and 340. Minors will not receive credit for Anthropology 388, 
398, or 399. Only four credits from Anthropology 305, 345, 365, 381, 382, 383, and 
384 may be used to meet minor requirements and departmental permission must 
be obtained for minor credit in these courses. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Anthropology," highly qualified 
majors should apply to the department for admission to the honors program. They 
must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfactorily 
defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information, members of 
the departmental faculty should be consulted. 



u 



66 

151. General Anthropology I: Archeology and Human Evolution. (4) Origin an 
evolution of man with a focus on human biological and sociocultural change du 
ing the Plio-Pleistocene. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 151 an 
Anthropology 162.) 

152. General Anthropology II: Cultural Anthropology. (4) A cross-cultural analys 
of human institutions with a survey of major theories explaining cultural varies 
and human nature. 

260. Archeological Laboratory Practicum. (2) Instruction in artifact cleaning, prese 
vation, cataloging, and analysis; preparation of museum exhibits; familiarizatic 
with darkroom procedures, drafting, and report preparation. P— Permission i 
instructor. 

261. Museum Practicum. (3) Designed to give the student practical experience whi 
working at the Museum of Man in six basic areas of museum operation: administr 
tion, research, curatorial duties, conservation, exhibition design, and educatio 
P— Permission of instructor. 



262. Physical Anthropology Practicum. (2) Practical experience in current problen 
in physical anthropology. P— Anthropology 151. 

305. Conflict and Change on Roatan Island (Honduras). (4) Readings and fie 
research focusing on the barriers and processes of sociocultural and technologic 
change in a heterogeneous island community. Usually offered in summer. P 
Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 and permission of instructor. 

310. Museum Design and Operation. (4) The principles of museum design ar 
operation through lectures, readings, workshops with visiting experts in the fiel' 
and field trips to neighboring museums (possibly to Washington, DC). Studen 
have an opportunity to put some of the principles in practice by planning and desig 
ing exhibits in the Museum of Man. P— Permission of instructor. 

321. The Anthropology of Art. (4) The arts (primarily visual) in folk and trib 
cultures from comparative, structural, and functional points of view. P— Permissic 
of instructor. 

340. Images of Man: Perspectives on Anthropological Thought. (4) A study ar 
evaluation of the major anthropological theories of man and society, includir 
cultural evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalism, structuralism, cultur 
ecology, and cultural materialism. The relevance and significance of these theorii 
to modern anthropology are discussed. P— Anthropology 151 and Anthropolo^ 
152, and sophomore or junior standing, or permission of instructor. 

342. Tradition and Conflict in Latin America. (4) Socio-cultural perspectives c 
contemporary problems in Latin America and the Caribbean. P— Anthropology 1' 
or Anthropology 152 or permission of instructor. 

343. Socio-cultural Development in the Third World. (4) Analytical survey of pr> 
blems facing Third World nations and the application of anthropology in chanj 
conflict situations today. P— Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or permissic 
of instructor. 






67 



M. Medical Anthropology. (4) The impact of Western medical practices and theory 
in non-Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solving of world 
tealth problems. P— Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

15. Mountain Folklore in North Carolina. (4) The role folklore plays in all human 
altures in general and in the culture of the mountain people of Western North 
farolina in particular. Field trips to mountain counties conducted. Usually offered 

: summer. P— Permission of instructor. 

sjl. Physical Anthropology. (4) Introduction to biological anthropology human 
iiology, evolution, and variability. P— Anthropology 151. 

52. Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology. (1) Basic methods used by 
Kysical anthropologists to gather data, such as blood grouping, measurement, der- 

i latoglyphics, and dental castings. Lab— two hours. P— Permission of instructor. 

53. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (4) The ethnology and prehistory of Negro 
frica south of the Sahara. P— Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

54. Primitive Religion. (4) The worldview and values of non-literate cultures as 
: rpressed in myths, rituals, and symbols. P— Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

55. Language and Culture. (4) An introduction to the relations between language 
'id culture, including methods for field research. P— Anthropology 151 or An- 
' tropology 152. 

56. Old World Prehistory. (4) Survey of Old World prehistory, with particular at- 
ntion to geological and climatological events affecting culture change. P— 

= nthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

,57. Archeology of Early Complex Societies. (4) Comparison of the archeology of 

j irly complex societies, with special attention to the Maya, Aztec, and Teotihuacan 
lltures in Mesoamerica; the Huari and Inca in South America; the Anasazi of North 
merica; and Egyptian and Mesopotamian groups of the Old World. An emphasis 

1 ill be given to theories of origins and change in complex societies. P— Anthropology 

Si or permission of instructor. 

»8. The American Indian. (4) Ethnology and prehistory of the American Indian. 
--Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

| >9. Prehistory of North America. (4) The development of culture in North America 

>t outlined by archeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology and 

>ciocultural processes. P— Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 
ft. 
•0. Archeology of the Southeastern United States. (4) A study of human adapta- 

)n in the Southeast from Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role of 

ological factors in determining the formal aspects of culture. P— Anthropology 151. 

il. Conservation Archeology. (4) A study of the laws, regulations, policies, pro- 
ams, and political processes used to conserve prehistoric and historic cultural 
sources. P— Anthropology 151 and Anthropology 359 or permission of instructor. 

»2. Human Ecology. (4) The relations between the human being and the inorganic 
id organic environments as mediated by culture; laboratory experience with aerial 



V 



68 

photography and other remote sensing techniques. P— Anthropology 151 or Ar 
thropology 152 or permission of instructor. 

364. Human Osteology. (4) A survey of human skeletal anatomy and analysis, err 
phasizing archeological and anthropological applications. P— Anthropology 151 an 
permission of instructor. 

365. Field Research in Physical Anthropology. (2, 3, or 4) Training in technique 
for the study of problems of physical anthropology, carried out in the field. Usuall 
offered in the summer. P— Permission of instructor. 

366. Human and Non-Human Evolution. (4) Investigation of primate and huma 
evolution, both in anatomy and in behavior. P— Anthropology 151 and permissio 
of instructor. 

371. European Peasant Communities. (4) Lectures, reading, and discussion o 
selected communities and their sociocultural contexts, including folklore, folk ar 
and processes of culture change. P— Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or pe 
mission of instructor. 



380. Anthropological Statistics. (4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in ar 
thropological research. (A student who receives credit for this course may not als 
receive credit for Biology 348, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Sociology 380 

381, 382. Archeological Research. (4, 4) The recovery of anthropological data throug 
the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a prehistor 
site. P— Anthropology 151. 

383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4, 4) Training in technique 
for the study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P— Anthropology 151 c 
Anthropology 152. 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (4) Intensive investigation of current sciei 
tific research within the discipline. The course concentrates on problems of cor 
temporary interest. P— Permission of instructor. 

387. Advanced Statistical Analysis in Anthropology. (4) Principles of multivarial 
statistical analysis and applications to anthropological problems. P— Anthropolog 
380. 

388. Senior Seminar. (4) A review of the contemporary problems in the fields 
archeology and physical and cultural anthropology. P— Senior standing or permissio 
of instructor. 

398, 399. Individual Study. (1, 2, 3, or 4) A reading, research, or internship coun 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried oi 
under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 






69 

Art 

Margaret S. Smith, Chairwoman 

Visiting Professor Terisio Pignatti (Venice) 

Associate Professors Robert Knott, Margaret S. Smith 

Assistant Professors Gary A. Cook, Paul H. D. Kaplan, 

Andrew W. Polk III, Harry B. Titus Jr. 

Lecturers Brian Allen, David Bindman, Richard T. Godfrey (London) 

Instructors Deborah Fanelli, Elizabeth A. Sutherland 

Gallery Director Victor Faccinto 

The department offers courses in the history of art and in the practice of draw- 
s', painting, printmaking, and sculpture. The program is designed to introduce 
idents to the humanistic study of the visual arts. The courses are intended to 
urease the student's understanding of the meaning and purpose of the arts and 
<eir historical developments, their role in society, and their relationship to other 
imanistic disciplines. The work in the classroom and studio is designed to inten- 
. y the student's visual perception and to develop a facility in a variety of technical 
Dcesses. A visiting artist program and varied exhibitions in the gallery of the Scales 
s ie Arts Center as well as internships in local cultural organizations supplement 
i regular academic program of the department. 

•The major in art requires forty credits. For an art history major, eight courses are 
c be in art history and two in studio art. For a studio art major, eight courses are 
be in studio art and two in art history. 

jITie studio art major may earn teacher certification in art education (K-12) by cross 
lustration with the Salem College teacher education program. 
\ minor in art requires five courses, including at least one course in art history 
d one course in studio art. 

'Any student interested in majoring or minoring in art should consult the chair- 
J man of the art department. 

Qualified students in both the art history and studio areas may ask to participate 
;:he department's honors program. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
;Art," students must execute a written project or create a body of work; the results 
1 heir efforts must be presented and defended before a committee of the depart- 
bntal faculty. Interested students should consult any member of the department 
!, additional information concerning the requirements for this program. 



Art History* 

' . Introduction to the Visual Arts. (4) An introduction to the arts of various 
< tures and times with discussions of technique, style, methodology, and terms. 
1 y be used to satisfy a requirement in Division I. 



'en to qualified freshmen and sophomores 



70 

221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on the sacrec 
and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hindu, Buddhist 
and Muslim art in India. 

228. Egyptian Art. (4) The art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the predynastu 
period through Roman Egypt. 

230. African Art. (4) The traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahara. 

231. American Art. (4) The survey of American painting from 1600 to 1900. 

233. American Architecture. (4) A survey of American architecture from 1600 U 
1900, with emphasis on eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 

235. The Arts in America. (4) A cultural and historical survey of the arts in Americ. 
from early settlement to the present day Attention is given to architecture, painting 
sculpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, photography, and some commercial image: 
as expressions of their time. 

241. Ancient Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from thi 
prehistoric through the late Roman periods. 

244. Greek Art. (3) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from th« 
prehistoric through the Hellenistic periods. 

245. Roman Art. (4) A survey of Etruscan and Roman architecture, painting, am 
sculpture. 

246. Greek and Roman Architecture. (4) A survey of classical architecture, fron 
the Archaic Greek through the late Roman period. 

250. Twentieth Century American Art and Literature. (4) An exploration of the ideas 
values, and feelings found in the art and literature of twentieth century figures sue] 
as Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, and Kafka. 

251. Women and Art. (4) A historical examination of the changing image of womei 

in art and the role of women artists. 

I 

252. Medieval Art. (4) A survey of painting and sculpture from 400 to 1400. 

253. Medieval Architecture. (4) A survey of architecture from the time of Constantin 
to the beginning of the Italian Renaissance. 

254. Romanesque Sculpture. (4) An examination of the re-emergence and develop 
ment of sculpture in Western Europe during the period 1000-1150. 

256. History of Books and Printing. (2-4) An examination of the development c 
the book from the invention of printing to the present. 

257. Printing on the Hand Press. (4) A study of the history of printing and book 
combined with the practical experience of learning the art and craft of printing 
The objectives of the course are to provide a basis for the appreciation of fine printin 
and to allow the student an opportunity to learn the techniques of hand printing 
P— Permission of instructor. 



71 

266. Art in the Age of Discovery. (4) An exploration of the visual imagery which 
recorded the expansion of Western civilization, and the active role which art played 
in that expansion, from Marco Polo and Giotto to Captain Cook and Tiepolo (c. 
1300-c. 1775). 

267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (4) An introduction to the painting, sculpture, 
and architecture of Italy from 1250 to 1500, with a concentration on the arts in fif- 
teenth century Florence. 

268. Italian High Renaissance and Mannerist Art. (4) A study of the arts in six- 
teenth century Italy, with emphasis on the achievement of Leonardo da Vinci, 
Raphael, Michelangelo, Giorgione, and Titian, and the dissolution of Renaissance 
idealism in the art of the early Mannerists. 

270. Northern Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of painting, sculpture, graphic art, 
and patronage in Northern European art from 1300 to the death of Du'rer in 1528. 

271. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, sculpture, 

i and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered 
in Dijon. 

271. Baroque Art. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 1600 to 1700. 

275. History of Landscape Architecture. (4) Study of garden design, beginning with 
Roman gardens and continuing through the creation of public parks in the nine- 
teenth century. 

281. Modern Art to 1900. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 
1700 to 1900, emphasizing the nineteenth century. 

' 282. Modern Art after 1900. (4) A survey of European and American painting and 
1 sculpture from 1900 to the present. P— Art 281 is recommended. 

283. Impressionism. (4) A detailed study of the French Impressionist painters, with 
1 some consideration of Impressionism in other forms. 

284. Contemporary American Art. (4) An intensive study of American painting and 
sculpture from 1950 to the present. 

286. Studies in Twentieth Century Art: Myth in Modern Art. (3) An analysis of 
traditional Western and non-Western myths as expressed and interpreted by twen- 
tieth century artists. 

291. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 

292. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 



1 293. Practicum. (4) Internships in local cultural organizations, to be arranged by 

the art department. Pass/Fail. 
i 

294. Modern Architecture. (4) A survey of European and American architecture 

from 1750 to the present, emphasizing the twentieth century. 

296. Art History Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty or visiting faculty 
3n topics of their choice. A paper is required. P— Permission of instructor. 



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72 

a. Ancient Art d. Baroque Art g. American Art 

b. Medieval Art e. Modern Art h. Modern Architecture 

c. Renaissance Art f. Contemporary Art i. American Architecture 

297. Seminar: Art and Politics. (4) In-depth examinations of works of art from tl 
medieval period to the Russian Revolution, selected for their significant politic 
content. 

2320. English Art, Hogarth to the Present. (4) A survey of English paintin 
sculpture, and architecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Sli< 
lectures, student reports, museum visits, and lectures. Taught by special lectun 
Offered in London. 

2693. Venetian Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of the art of the Venetian Renaissaru 
with slide lectures and museum visits. Offered in Venice. 

Anthropology 321. The Anthropology of Art. (4) The arts (primarily visual) in fc 
and tribal cultures from comparative, structural, and functional points of view. F- 
Permission of instructor. 

Studio Art** 

111. Introduction to Drawing and Design. (4) Introduction to the basic elemer. 
of two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, to include drawing, paintir 
and sculpture. Six class hours per week. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

112. Introduction to Painting. (4) An introduction to painting fundamentals in 
variety of contemporary styles in the oil or acrylic media. P— Art 111. 

115. Introduction to Sculpture. (4) An introduction to basic sculptural styles ail 
multi-media, with emphasis on contemporary concepts. P— Art 111. 

117. Introduction to Printmaking. (4) Concentrated introduction to one or more : 
the following areas of printmaking: lithography, intaglio, and silkscreen. P— Art T. 

211. Intermediate Drawing. (4) Continuation of Art 111, with concentrated empha i 
on drawing fundamentals and idea development in realistic and abstract styles, ei- 
phasizing composition, value, line, and form. Six class hours per week. P— Art T. 

212. Intermediate Painting. (4) Continuation of Art 112, with concentrated empha ; 
on idea development. P— Art 112. May be repeated. 

215. Intermediate Sculpture. (4) Continuation of Art 115, with emphasis on idi 
development. P— Art 115. May be repeated. 

217. Intermediate Printmaking. (4) Continuation of Art 117, with emphasis on idi 
development. P— Art 117. May be repeated. 

218. Figure Drawing. (4) Introduction to figure drawing. 



*Prerequisites may be waived with permission of instructor. 



73 

!19. Advanced Sculpture. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance, 
vlay be repeated. P— Art 215. 

>22. Advanced Painting. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance, 
vlay be repeated. P— Art 212. 

!23. Advanced Drawing. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance, 
vlay be repeated. P— Art 211. 

[;129. Advanced Printmaking. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. 
t vlay be repeated. P— Art 217. 

!95. Studio Seminar. (2, 4) Offered by members of the faculty or visiting faculty 
pn topics of their choice and related studio activities. P— Permission of instructor. 

Asian Studies 

I 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, Director 

The Asian Studies program, established in 1960 with financial assistance from 

he Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, is interdisciplinary and involves the 

ooperation and resources of several departments in the humanities and social 

' iciences. Its objectives are to broaden the traditional curriculum with the infusion 

,)f a systematic knowledge and understanding of the culture of Asia. 

^sian Studies 211, 212. Asian Studies. (4, 4) Asian thought and civilization. Some 
lominant themes in Asian thought and their influence on Asian civilizations. 

^rt 221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on the 
;acred and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hindu, Bud- 
Ihist, and Muslim art in India. 

jlhinese 111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listen- 
ing and speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system and 
o basic sentence patterns. Lab— one hour. 

Tindi 111, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
vocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab— one hour. 

-lindi 153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and 
onversation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab— one hour. P— Hindi 111, 112, 
>r equivalent. 

lindi 211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose 
md poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lab— one hour. P— Hindi 153. 

listory 341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history 
md culture of Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference 
o economic, social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the 
■mergence of new nation-states. 

listory 342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) 

vlajor subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and 
'ersians under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence 
>f the modern Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 



// 



74 

History 343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinesi 
society to 1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing con 
tinuity and resistance to change. 

History 344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to thi 
Western challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Com 
munists, Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

History 345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introductioi 
to the history and civilization of South Asia, with emphasis on historica 
developments in the social, economic, and cultural life of the area. 

History 347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey o 
images of India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious anc 
philosophical ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

History 348. Modern Japan. (4) Tokugawa era; Meiji Restoration; industrializatior 
and urbanization; relations with the West; World War II; occupation; Japan in th< 
contemporary world. 

History 349, 350. East Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and politica 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. 349: to 1600; 350: since 1600. 

Politics 234. Government and Politics of East Asia. (4) An analysis of the politica 
institutions and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problems o 
modernization. 

Politics 245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the govern 
ments of India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon; emphasis on political organizations 
party structures, and subnational governmental systems. 

Religion 360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindi 
tradition. 

Religion 361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist traditon, its fundamenta 
features, and its impact on the cultures of Asia. 

Religion 364. Islam. (4) A study of the fundamental concepts of Islamic though 
and the historical context of its development. Both ancient and contemporary im 
pact of the teachings of Islam are considered. 

Biology 

Gerald W. Esch, Chairman 

Professors Charles M. Allen, Ralph D. Amen, Ronald V. Dimock Jr., 

Gerald W. Esch, Mordecai J. Jaffe, Raymond E. Kuhn, 

James C. McDonald, Robert L. Sullivan, Peter D. Weigl, Raymond L. Wyatt 

Associate Professors John F. Dimmick, Herman E. Eure, A. Thomas Olive 

Assistant Professors Carole L. Browne, Robert A. Browne, 

Hugo C. Lane, William A. Thomas 

Adjunct Professors J. Whitfield Gibbons, Harold O. Goodman, 

Stephen H. Richardson 



75 

At the end of the sophomore year a student electing to major in biology meets 

with a major adviser to plan the course of study for the junior and senior years. 

The requirements for completion of the major are those in effect at the time of the 

conference, since the curriculum and departmental requirements may change slightly 
' during the student's period of residence. All majors are required to take Biology 
1 111, 112, 211, and 212. Co-major requirements are Chemistry 111 and 112 and two 

additional courses in the physical sciences. 
i For students declaring majors in the spring, the requirement for a major is a 
: minimum of forty-one credits in biology. The forty-one credits must include at least 

six biology courses carrying five credits. A rninimum grade average of C on all courses 

attempted in biology in the College is required for graduation with a major in biology. 

(Students declaring a major later than the spring should consult with a biology major 

adviser for the specific major requirement at that time.) A minor in biology requires 

twenty credits. 
3 Prospective majors are strongly urged to take Chemistry 111, 112 and Biology 111, 
"• 112 in the freshman year. They are advised to take Biology 211 and Biology 212 in 

the sophomore year, as well as organic chemistry. Deviations from this pattern may 
, necessitate summer work to fit the basic courses into an orderly sequence. 

Advanced work in many areas of biology may require additional courses in 

mathematics, the physical sciences, and other areas of biology. The adviser calls 
} these to the attention of the student, depending on individual needs. All 300-level 

biology courses presume a background equivalent to introductory and intermediate 

biology (that is, through Biology 212). 
Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
n the honors program in biology. To be graduated with the distinction "Honors in 

Biology," they must complete a research project under the direction of a staff member 

and pass a comprehensive oral examination. 



1; 111. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in biology. 
Lab— three hours. 

i 112. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals. 
-. Lab— three hours. P— Biology 111 or permission of instructor. 

211. Population Biology. (4) Population and evolutionary aspects of biology. P— 
Biology 111 or permission of instructor. 

212. Cell Biology. (5) Molecular and cellular aspects of biology. Lab— three hours. 
P-Biology 111 and Chemistry 111, 112. 

301-305. Topics in Biology. (1-5) Seminar and/or lecture courses in selected topics, 
. some involving laboratory instruction. 

312. Genetics. (5) A study of principles in inheritance and their application to plants 
and animals, including humans. Laboratory work in the methods of breeding some 
genetically important organisms and of compiling and presenting data. Lab— three 
hours. 

314. Evolution. (4) Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of evolution. 



V 



76 

320. Comparative Anatomy. (5) A study of chordate animals, with emphasis c 
comparative anatomy and phylogeny. Dissection of representative forms in tl 
laboratory. Lab— four hours. 

321. Parasitology. (5) A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasit 
from the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host/parasite rel 
tionships. Lab— three hours. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on anim 
behavior. (May count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to be determin< 
at registration.) 

325. Plant Anatomy. (5) A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular plant 
with emphasis on phylogeny. Lab— four hours. 

326. Microbiology. (5) The structure, function, and taxonomy of microorganisn 
with emphasis on the bacteria. Some immunological processes are considerei 
Lab— four hours. 

327. Nonvascular Plants. (5) An examination of representative nonvascular plant 
with emphasis on morphology and phylogeny. Lab— four hours. 

328. Vascular Plants. (5) A comparative survey of the vascular plants, with emphas 
on structure, reproduction, classification, and phylogeny. Lab— four hours. 

331. Invertebrates. (5) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on fun 
tional morphology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab— three hours. 

333. Vertebrates. (5) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolution 
physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to systematic, field, and e 
perimental studies. Lab— four hours. 

334. Entomology. (5) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, developmen 
taxonomy, and phylogeny. Lab— four hours. 

338. Plant Taxonomy. (5) A study of the classification of seed plants, with emphas 
on the comparative study of orders and families. Lab— four hours. 

340. Ecology. (5) Interrelationships among living systems and their environment 
structure and dynamics of major ecosystem types; contemporary problems i 
ecology. Lab— four hours. 

341. Marine Biology. (5) An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biologic 
parameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. Lab— three hours. 

342. Aquatic Ecology. (5) A course designed to cover the general principles ar 
concepts of limnology and aquatic biology as they apply to lentic and lotic habitat 
A major portion of the field study is centered at the Charles M. Allen Biologic 
Station. Lab— three hours. 

344. Population and Evolutionary Biology. (5) Readings and discussions of topi" 
in evolutionary ecology, including population dynamics, life history strategies, con 
petition, niche theory, resource partitioning and community structure, species dive 
sity, and ecological successions. Lab— three hours. 



77 

348. Biostatistics. (4) An introduction to statistical methods used by biologists, in- 
cluding descriptive statistics, hypothesis-testing, analysis of variance, and regression 
and correlation. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive 
credit for Business 201, Mathematics 157, Sociology 380, or Anthropology 380.) 

350. Physiology. (5) A lecture/laboratory course dealing with the physiochemical 
functions common to multicellular organisms, with emphasis on the principles and 
processes of nutrition, metabolism, development, and behavior. Lab— three hours. 

j 351. Animal Physiology. (5) A lecture and laboratory course which discusses and 
demonstrates the principles of bioelectricity and biomechanics. Regulatory prin- 
ciples and the physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems of 
vertebrates are covered. Lab— three hours. P— Biology 151. 

352. Plant Physiology. (5) A study of the mechanisms by which various plant 
systems function, thematically structured around the plant life cycle. Lab— three 
hours. 

354. Endocrinology. (4) A lecture course which considers the evolution of the en- 
docrine glands and hormones and the physiology of the main hormonal pathways 
of vertebrates. 

' 355. Developmental Physiology. (5) The application of the principles and postulates 
of molecular biology to the phenomenon of development in multicellular organisms 

i with emphasis on the genetic and hormonal mechanisms of differentiation, 
totipotency, and morphogenesis. Lab— three hours. 

i 357. Cryptobiology. (4) The genetic and physiologic mechanisms of common states 
| of biotic rest in multicellular organisms: quiescence, dormancy, diapause, hiberna- 
tion, estivation, sleep, and coma. Focus will be on the relation of states of biotic 
rest to senescence and death. 

359. Photobiology. (4) A lecture/seminar exploring photochemical mechanisms and 
ecological roles common to a variety of photoresponses in living organisms, including 

" vision, bioluminescence, phototaxis, photosynthesis, photoperiodism, and 
photomorphogenesis. 

360. Development. (5) A description of the major events and processes of animal 
development, with an analysis of the causal factors underlying them. Special 
attention is given to the embryonic development of vertebrates, but consideration 

i is also given to other types of development and other organisms. Topics include 
fertilization, early development, growth and cell division, cell differentiation, the 
role of genes in development, cell interaction, morphogenesis, regeneration, birth 
defects, and cancer. 

362. Immunology. (4) A study of the components and protective mechanisms of 
the immune system. 

370. Biochemistry. (4) A lecture course introducing the principles of biochemistry, 
with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. Included 
are surveys of essential biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism, 
biochemical energetics, and macromolecular organization. 



V 



78 

371. Biochemistry. (1) A laboratory course demonstrating various techniques in tl 
purification and analysis of biomolecules. To be taken in conjunction with Bioloj 
370. Pass/Fail. Lab— four hours. 

372. Molecular Biology. (4) A lecture course that considers the role of biological 
important molecules in membrane and intracellular regulation. Topics covered w 
include membrane receptors, transport processes, molecular models of hormon 
regulation, and controls of gene expression. 

373. Techniques in Electron Microscopy. (5) An introduction to the electn 
microscope as an experimental tool in biology. Includes instruction in comrru 
techniques used in the field and lecture on recognition and interpretation of cellul 
ultrastructure. 

376. Ichthyology. (5) A comparative study of structure/function, classification, ai 
phylogeny of fish. Lab— three hours. 

391, 392. Special Problems in Biology. (2, 2) Courses designed for students wl j 
wish to continue special problems beyond Biology 391 and 392. Pass/Fail option; 
Not to be counted toward major. P— Permission of instructor. 

395. Philosophy of Biology and Medicine. (4) A lecture/seminar course dealii 
with the rational structure of biologic and biomedic sciences with major empha; 
on the reductionistic, organismic, and telenomic paradigms of modern biology ai 
medicine. The structure of selected biologic and biomedic theories will be include 

397. Seminar in Biology. (2-4) Consideration of major biological topics through i 
tensive reading and discussions. 

398. Scientific Communications. (3) An introduction to bibliographic and grapl 
methods, including microscopy, photography, scientific illustration and writing, ai 
preparation of manuscripts. Not to be counted for credit toward degree in biolo£ 
Open to juniors or by permission of instructor. 



Chemistry 

R. E. Noftle, Chairman 

Professors Phillip J. Hamrick Jr., Roger A. Hegstrom, 

Ronald E. Noftle, John W. Nowell 

Associate Professors Paul M. Gross Jr., Willie L. Hinze, 

Charles F. Jackels, Susan C. Jackels 

Assistant Professors Huw M. L. Davies, Robert F. Ferrante, 

Richard R. M. Jones 

The department offers programs leading to the BA and BS degrees in chemist' 
and is on the list of departments certified by the American Chemical Society. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry includes Chemistry 111, 112; or 113, !':■ 
221, 222, 341, 342, 361; Mathematics 111; and Physics 111, 112 or its equivalent.: 
is recommended that Mathematics 112 be taken before Chemistry 341. 



, 



79 

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry includes Chemistry 111, 112; or 113, 
4; 221, 222, 334, 341, 342, 361, 371, 391, or 392; Mathematics 111 and 112; and Physics 
!1, 122 or 111, 112. Other courses which are strongly recommended for the BS degree 
indidate are Mathematics 113, 121, and 251 and Physics 161, 162. 
A minor in chemistry requires twenty-three credits in chemistry and must include 
least one of the following courses: 323, 334, 341, 342, 361, 362, 371. The depart- 
ent will not accept courses taken Pass/Fail to count towards the minor. 
Chemistry 231 is an elective course designed to strengthen the student's 
lickground in analytical chemistry. Some professional schools specifically require 
:ich a course. 

Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses are open to chemistry majors on 
etter grade basis only. Majors are also required to complete on a letter grade basis 
e related physics and mathematics courses, both those which are required and 
ose which are strongly recommended. 

A minimum GPA of 2.0 in the first two years of chemistry is required of students 
v io elect to major in the department. Admission to any class is contingent upon 
itisfactory grades in prerequisite courses, and registration for advanced courses 
ust be approved by the department. Candidates for either the BA or BS degree 
^th a major in chemistry must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in their required 
v emistry courses numbered 200 or above. 

Qualified majors are considered for honors in chemistry. To be graduated with 
:; designation "Honors in Chemistry," a student must complete satisfactorily 
lemistry 391, 392 or an independent study project approved by the department 
d an examination covering primarily the independent study project. For addi- 
nal information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 
3 x>t the BS major the following schedule of chemistry and related courses is typical: 

shman Sophomore Junior Senior 

emistry 111, 112 Chemistry 221, 222 Chemistry 341, 342 Chemistry 334 

or Physics 121, 122 Chemistry 391 or 392 Chemistry 361 

emistry 113, 114 or Mathematics or Chemistry 371 

thematics 111, 112 Physics 111, 112 Physics Mathematics or 

Mathematics 113, 251 Physics 

br the BA major the following schedule of chemistry and related courses is typical: 

>hman Sophomore Junior Senior 

1 emistry 111, 112 Chemistry 221, 222 Chemistry 341, 342 Chemistry 361 

or Physics 111, 112 
' emistry 113, 114 or 

i thematics 111, 112* Physics 121, 122 

' 'thematics 112 is encouraged as an elective in the freshman or sophomore year. 

or variations in either of the schedules above, the student should consult a 
i mber of the faculty in chemistry. 

tudents electing laboratory courses in chemistry are required to pay for breakage 
I 1 for certain consumable materials as determined by the department. 



1/ 



80 

111, 112. College Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory 
covers experimental aspects of basic concepts. Lab— three hours. 

113, 114. College Chemistry — Honors. (5, 5) Covers the same range of materia 
as 111-112 but is designed for students with a superior background in chemistry 
A student may not receive credit for both 111 and 113 or both 112 and 114. Lab- 
three hours. P— Permission of instructor. 

118. Principles of Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles, with emphasi: 
on structural concepts. Laboratory work on experimental aspects of basic concepts 
Lab— four hours. P— Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor. 

221, 222. Organic Chemistry. (5, 5) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry 
Lab— four hours. P— Chemistry 112 or 114. 

231. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Principles and methods of quantitative analysis. P- 
Chemistry 12 or 114. Lecture— two hours. Lab— four hours. Offered fall and spring 

301, 302. Elective Research. (0, 0) P— Permission of instructor. Summers only. 

323. Organic Analysis. (5) The systematic identification of organic compounds 
Lab— four hours. P— Chemistry 222. 

324. Chemical Synthesis. (2 or 4) A library, conference, and laboratory course. Lab 
four or eight hours. P— Chemistry 222. 

334. Chemical Analysis. (5) Theoretical and practical application of modern method 
of chemical analysis. Lab— four hours. C— Chemistry 341. 

341, 342. Physical Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Lab— fou 
hours. P— Chemistry 112 or 114, Mathematics 111, Physics 111, 112 or 121, 122. 

361. Inorganic Chemistry. (5) Principles and reactions of inorganic chemistry. Lab- 
four hours. P— Chemistry 341. 

362. Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Continuation of principles of inorganic chemistry witl 
practical applications to inorganic systems. P— Chemistry 361. 

371. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. (4) Introduction to the quantum theory an< 
its application to chemical systems. P— Chemistry 342 or permission of instructor 

381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. (0, 0) Discussions of contemporary research. Atten 
dance required of BS chemistry majors in the junior and senior years. 

391, 392. Undergraduate Research. (2, 2) Undergraduate research. Lab— six hours 



Classical Languages 

Robert W. Ulery Jr., Chairman 

Professor Carl V. Harris 

Associate Professors John L. Andronica, Robert W. Ulery Jr. 

Visiting Assistant Professors Christopher P. Frost, 

Mary L. B. Pendergraft 

Instructor John E. Rowland 









81 

The Department of Classical Languages offers three majors: Greek, Latin, and 
:lassical studies. Minors are offered in Greek and Latin. 

j A major in Greek requires forty credits in the department. Thirty-two of these 
credits must be in the Greek language. Classics 270 is also a requirement. 
j A minor in Greek requires twenty-five credits: Greek 111-112, 153, 211, and either 
>12 or 231; and Classics 270. 

For those who begin Latin with Latin 111 or 113, a major requires thirty-six credits 

n the department beyond the elementary level (111, 112, or 113). Twenty-eight of 

{ hese credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin with a 200-level 

:ourse in the College, a major requires thirty-two credits in the department. Twenty- 

:our of these credits must be in the Latin language. 

A minor in Latin requires three 200-level courses in Latin: Classics 271; and one 



,idditional course (three or four credits) in Greek or Latin or classics. 

A major in classical studies requires fifty-six credits. A minimum of thirty-six credits 
)f course work must be taken in the department. A maximum of forty-eight credits 
in the department may be exceeded only if a student undertakes course work in 

,.>oth Latin and Greek. The student must take a minimum of two courses at the 

!00-level in either Greek or Latin and the following: Art 241 (Ancient Art), Classics 

'65 (Greek Literature), Classics 272 (Latin Literature), Classics 270 (Greek Civilization), 

md Classics 271 (Roman Civilization). 

A maximum of sixteen credits may be taken in the following:, 252 (Medieval Art), 

r ~'M (Greek Art), 245 (Roman Art), 246 (Greek and Roman Architecture); History 215, 
16 (The Ancient World); Philosophy 201 (Ancient and Medieval Philosophy), 230 (Plato), 

-31 (Aristotle); Religion 317 (The Ancient Near East), 363 (Hellenistic Religions); Hebrew 
11, 112, 153, 211. Other courses may be allowed with the permission of the 
lepartment. 

The requirements for certification to teach Latin in high school are the same as 
he requirements for a major in Latin. A major in classical studies serves as an ap- 
'ropriate part of the program of studies required for certification to teach Latin in 
iigh school. A student wishing to secure this certification should confer with the 

f hairman of the department. 

I Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
ne honors program in Latin, Greek, or classical studies. To be graduated with the 
esignation "Honors in Latin," "Honors in Greek," or "Honors in Classical Studies," 
student must complete an honors research project and pass a comprehensive oral 
xamination. For honors in Latin or Greek, at least two of the courses counted toward 
ie major must be seminar courses; for honors in classical studies, at least one 
Birtinar course in Latin or Greek is required. For additional information members 
f the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Greek 

U, 112. Elementary Greek. (5, 5) Greek grammar; selections from Greek prose 
Titers and poets. 

53. Intermediate Greek. (4) Grammar and Xenophon's Anabasis. Thorough drill 
i syntax. 



:// 



82 

211. Plato. (4) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. 

212. Homer. (4) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. 

221, 222. Selected Readings. (3, 3) Intensive reading courses designed to meet in- 
dividual needs and interests. 

231. The Greek New Testament. (4) Selections from the Greek New Testament. 

241. Greek Tragedy. (3) Euripides' Medea. This course includes a study of the origin 
and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of selected tragedies in transla- 
tion. Seminar. 

242. Greek Comedy. (3) Aristophanes' Clouds. This course includes a study of the 
origin and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of selected comedies 
in translation. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Greek. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Latin 

111, 112. Elementary Latin. (4, 4) Introduction to Latin grammar. 

113. Intensive Elementary Latin. (5) Introduction to Latin grammar. Covers material 
of Latin 111 and 112 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 111 
or 112. 

153. Intermediate Latin. (5) Grammar review and selected readings. 

211. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (4) Readings primarily from Vergil's Aeneid, with 
an introduction to literary criticism. 

212. Introduction to Latin Prose. (4) Readings primarily from the orations of Cicero, 
with attention to the elements of rhetoric in Roman public discourse. 

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (4) An interpretation and evaluation of lyric poetry through 
readings from the poems of Catullus and Horace. 

221. Roman Historians. (4) Readings in the works of Sallust, Livy, or Tacitus, with 
attention to the historical background and the norms of ancient historiography. 

225. Roman Epistolography. (4) Selected readings from the correspondence of Cicero 
and Pliny the Younger and the verse epistles of Horace and Ovid. 

226. Roman Comedy. (4) Readings of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, 
with a study of the traditions of comedy and dramatic techniques. 

231. Roman Elegy. (4) Readings from the poems of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, 
with study of the elegiac tradition. 

241. Roman Satire. (4) Selected readings from Horace and Juvenal, with attention 
to the origin and development of hexameter satire. 

243. Latin Readings. (2-4) A course designed to meet individual needs and interests. 

250. Prose Composition. (2) Exercises in writing of Latin prose, with an introduc- 
tion to prose stylistics. 



83 



Seminars 

The following seminars are offered by members of the faculty on topics and authors 
of their choice. A paper is required. 



261. Seminar in Poetry of the Republican Period. (3) 



262. Seminar 



282. Seminar 



in Prose of the Republican Period. (3) 



281. Seminar in Augustan and Later Poetry. (3) 



in Augustan and Later Prose. (3) 



291, 292. Honors in Latin. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 



a Classics 

220. Greek and Latin in Current Use. (3) A systematic study of Greek and Latin 
loan words, roots, prefixes, and suffixes as elements of English and specialized 
vocabularies (e.g., scientific and legal). A knowledge of the Greek and Latin 
languages is not required. 

251. Classical Mythology. (4) A study of the most important myths of the Greeks 

and Romans. Many of the myths are studied in their literary context. A knowledge 

= of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 
■• 

252. Women in Antiquity. (3, 4) The course explores the place of women in Greek 

and Roman society, men's views of them, their views of themselves, and their con- 
tribution to society, through primary source readings from the ancient authors. A 
I knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

253. Greek Epic Poetry. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on the Iliad 
, and the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre. A knowledge 

of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

{ 254. Roman Epic Poetry. (4) A study of the Latin treatment and development of 
1 the literary form, with emphasis on Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucian. A knowledge 
i of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

263. Tragic Drama. (4) A study of the origins and development of Greek tragedy 
and its influence on Roman writers, with readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
Euripides. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (4) Representative works of Aristophanes, 
Menander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the origins and development 
of comedy. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

265. A Survey of Greek Literature. (4) A study of selections from Greek literature 
in English translation. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. 

271. Roman Civilzation. (3) Lectures and collateral reading upon the general sub- 
ject of Rome's contribution to the modern world. A knowledge of the Latin language 
is not required. 

272. A Survey of Latin Literature. (4) A study of selections from Latin literature 
in English translation. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 



84 



288. Individual Study. (2-4) 

291, 292. Honors in Classical Studies. (2, 2) Directed research for honors pape 

Economics 

John C. Moorhouse, Chairman 
Professors Walter Adams, Donald E. Frey, 

John C. Moorhouse, J. Van Wagstaff 

Associate Professor J. Daniel Hammond 

Assistant Professors Tony H. Elavia, Diana L. Fuguitt, Richard P. Hydell 

Visiting Assistant Professor Claire Holton Hammond 

Visiting Instructors J. Rody Borg, John Lodewijks 

The objectives of the economics program are to help prepare students for effc 
tive participation in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analytic 
skills in solving economic problems, to promote a better understanding of alte 
native economic systems, and to provide a balanced curriculum to prepare studem 
for graduate study or positions in industry and government. 

The major in economics requires a minimum of thirty-six credits in economic: 
including Economics 151, 152, 201, and 202* In order to major in economics, a sh 
dent must have earned a minimum of a C in each of Economics 151 and Economic 
152. The department recommends that majors take Mathematics 109 and 111, eithe 
to fulfill the Division II requirement or as electives. A student may offer up to fiv 
credits toward the thirty-six credits required for a major by taking one of the followin 
courses, provided that, for (c), (d), (e), or (f), the complementary course in economic 
is successfully completed. 

(a) Mathematics 112. Second semester of Calculus. (5) 

(b) Philosophy 279. Philosophy of Science. (4) 

(c) Politics 210. Major Topics in Public Policy. (2, 4) (Economics 221. Public Finance 

(d) Politics 253. The Politics of International Relations. (4) (Economics 251. Interna 
tional Economics) 

(e) History 344. Modern China. (4) (Economics 255. Comparative Economic System; 

(f) History 332. Russia. (4) (Economics 255. Comparative Economic Systems) 

The remaining courses for a major in economics and courses in related fields ar 
selected by the student and the adviser. A minimum grade average of C on all course 
attempted in economics is required for graduation. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission t 
the honors program in economics. To be graduated with the designation "Honoi 
in Economics," they must complete a satisfactory economics research project, pas 
a comprehensive oral examination on the project, and complete Economics 281 c 
282 and Economics 288. For additional information members of the department; 
faculty should be consulted. 









*Economics 111 satisfies the requirement for Economics 151 and 152 by permission of the department 



85 

The Departments of Economics and Mathematics and Computer Science offer 
a joint major leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. 
This interdisciplinary program, consisting of no more than fifty-six credits, affords 
the student an opportunity to apply mathematical methods to the development of 
economic theory, models, and quantitative analysis. The major consists of the follow- 
ing course requirements: Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 152, 
201, 202, 215, 218; and three additional courses chosen with the approval of the pro- 
gram advisers. Recommended courses are Mathematics 253, 348, 353, 357, 358, and 
Economics 212, 242, 251, 281, 282, and 288. Students electing the joint major must 

1 receive permission from both the Department of Economics and the Department 
of Mathematics and Computer Science. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors pro- 
gram in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 

; Mathematical Economics," they must complete a senior research paper and pass 

- a comprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information 

j| members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

: 

111. Introduction to Economic Analysis. (4) A survey of the discipline for students 

who wish to take only one course in economics. Elementary supply and demand 

. analysis is considered, in addition to more general topics involving the formation 

1 of national economic policy. (Credit is not granted for this course and Economics 

J 151 or 152.) 

1 151. Principles of Economics. (4) A study of individual economic units in a market 
'i economy, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty. 

n 152. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of the 
economy as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economic 
growth, and policy. P— Economics 151. 

188. Individual Study. (4) Directed readings in a specialized area of economics. P— 
'Permission of instructor. 



201. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Develops the theory of consumer behavior and 
, the theory of the firm, with emphasis on price and output determination under 

various market conditions. P— Economics 151, 152. 

202. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Keynesian and post-Keynesian theories 
3 about the determination of the level of national income, employment, and economic 

growth. P— Economics 151, 152. 

210. Economic Indicators. (2) The theory, construction, and interpretation of signifi- 
i cant quantitative indicators of economic behavior, such as the unemployment rate 
and the various price indices. P— Economics 151, 152. 

212. Economic Forecasting. (4) A computer oriented application of modern 
econometric and time series methods for forecasting economic variables. P— 
Economics 151, 152. C— Economics 202. 

215. Introduction to Econometrics. (5) Economic analysis through quantitative 
methods, with emphasis on model construction and empirical research. P— 
Economics 151, 152; and Mathematics 157 or 121. 



86 



218. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (4) Calculus and matrix methods use 
to develop basic tools of economic analysis. P— Mathematics 111, 112 and Economii 
201. 

221. Public Finance. (4) An examination of the economic behavior of governmen 
Includes principles of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt-management. P 
Economics 151, 152. 

222. Monetary Theory and Policy. (4) A rigorous development of the theory of suj 
ply and demand for money, plus the relationships among prices, interest rates, ar 
aggregate output. P— Economics 151, 152. 

224. Law and Economics. (4) An economic analysis of property, contracts, tort 
criminal behavior, due process, and law enforcement. P— Economics 151, 152. 

225. Public Choice. (4) Traditional tools of economic analysis are employed to e 
plore such topics in political science as political organization, elections, coalitic 
formation, the optimal provision of public goods, and the scope of governmen 
P— Economics 151, 152. 

242. Labor Economics. (4) Economic analysis of wages and hours, employmen 
wage and job discrimination, investment in education, and unions. P— Economii 
151, 152. 

244. Industrial Organization. (4) An analysis of market structure, with particul 
reference to organization practices, price formation, efficiency, and public regul 
tion. P— Economics 151, 152. 

248. Resource Economics. (4) The economic theory of natural resource allocatic 
and environmental quality. P— Economics 201. 

251. International Economics. (4) A study of international trade theory, balance i 
payments, foreign exchange, trade restrictions, and commercial policies. P 
Economics 201. 

252. Economic Growth and Development. (4) A study of the problems of econom 
growth, with particular attention to the less developed countries of the world. P 
Economics 151, 152. 

255. Comparative Economic Systems. (4) An examination of several major noi 
capitalist economies, with special reference to the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, an 
the People's Republic of China. P— Economics 151, 152. 

256. Urban Economics. (4) Application of economic theory to suburbanization, Ian 
values, urban decay, zoning, location decisions of firms and households, an 
metropolitan fiscal problems. P— Economics 151, 152. 

261. American Economic Development. (4) The application of economic theory I 
historical problems and issues in the American economy. P— Economics 151, 15 

262. History of Economic Thought. (4) A historical survey of the main develoj 
ments in economic thought from the Biblical period to the twentieth century. P- 
Economics 151, 152. 



87 

\7\, 272. Selected Areas in Economics. (4, 4) A survey of an important area in 
conomics not included in the regular course offerings. The economics of housing, 
ducation, technology, and health services are examples. Students should consult 
vith instructor to ascertain topic before enrolling. P— Economics 151, 152. 

75. Economic Philosophers. (4) An in-depth study of the doctrines and influence 
f three major figures in economics, such as Smith, Marx, and Keynes. P— Economics 
J01, 202. 

81. Seminar in Economic Theory and Policy: Micro. (4) Microeconomic analysis 
f contemporary issues, with emphasis on contributions to policy. P— Permission 
( f instructor. 

!82. Seminar in Economic Theory and Policy: Macro. (4) A consideration of re- 
ent developments in macroeconomic theory with a discussion of their implications 
px policy. P— Permission of instructor. 

388. Economic Research. (4) Development and defense of a senior research pro- 
;ct. Required of candidates for departmental honors. P— Permission of department. 



Education 

jj Joseph D. Milner, Chairman 

Professors Thomas M. Elmore, John E. Parker Jr., J. Don Reeves 
Associate Professors Patricia M. Cunningham, John H. Litcher, 
ij Joseph O. Milner, Leonard P. Roberge 

Assistant Professors Robert H. Evans, Linda N. Nielsen 
Lecturers Brian M. Austin, G. Dianne Mitchell, Marianne Schubert, 

Stuart Wright 

Visiting Lecturer Richard I. Tirrell 

Instructor Dorothy P. Hall 

( 
Because Wake Forest University believes that the educational profession is im- 
ortant to society and that our welfare is significantly affected by the quality of our 
iucational leadership, one of the important objectives of the University has been 
id continues to be the preparation of teachers and other professional school per- 
)nnel. The University's commitment to quality in teacher education is demonstrated 
y selective admission to the program, a wide range of professional courses, and 
osely supervised internships appropriate to the professional needs of students. 
Prospective teachers either major in other academic areas and take education 
)urses to earn secondary certification or earn intermediate, science, or social studies 
?rnfication as majors in the Department of Education. Certification for the primary 
' middle school grades can also be earned by intermediate majors who wish to 
ctend their range of teaching certification. In addition to the professional program, 
ie department provides a non-professional minor and elective courses open to all 
udents. 

Teacher Certification. The North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction 
sues the Professional Class A Teacher's Certificate to graduates who have com- 



V 



88 



pleted an approved program, including the specified courses in their teaching field(s 
and the prescribed courses in education, who have demonstrated specific 
competencies, and who receive recommendations from the designated official^ 
of their teaching area(s) and from the chairman of the department or a deputy. 

Special students (those not having completed prior to graduation an approvec 
certification program from this or another institution) are required to secure frorr 
the department an analysis of their academic deficiencies and a plan for completing 
the Class A Certificate. Information about certification requirements for other states 
can be secured from the department as assistance in planning a program to meel 
the certification requirements of those states. 

Admission Requirements. Admission to the teacher education program normally 
occurs during the sophomore year. Admission involves filing an official applicatior 
with the department, being screened by faculty committees, and being officially 
approved by the department. 

Course Requirements. The approved program of teacher education requires can- 
didates to complete successfully a series of professional education courses. The exad 
sequence of professional and academic courses varies with a student's particulai 
program and is determined in conference with the candidate. For those seeking 
secondary certification the majority of the professional work is taken during one 
semester of the senior year. Candidates for the intermediate certificate may begir 
course work required for certification as early as the sophomore year. A cooperative 
agreement with Salem College gives education majors the additional opportunity 
to be certified in learning disabilities. 

Student Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for student teaching include (1) senior, 
graduate, or special student classification; (2) completion of school practicum and 
foundations of education courses; (3) an average of at least C on all course work; 
(4) an average of at least C on all courses taken in the area(s) of certification; (5) 
departmental approval for admission to the teacher education program. 

Students are assigned to student teaching opportunities by public school officials 
on the basis of available positions and the professional needs of the student and 
the public school system. (The University does not assume responsibility foi 
transportation to schools during student teaching.) For both secondary and in- 
termediate students one semester of the senior year is reserved for the student 
teaching experience and the block of courses preparatory to that experience in the 
schools. Students may not take other courses during this semester without the ap- 
proval of the director of teacher education. 

Teaching Area Requirements 

English— Thirty-six credits, including four credits from courses numbered 160-175; 

at least sixteen credits from courses numbered 300-399; 323; 390. 

French— Thirty-six credits, including French 153, 216 or 217, 219, 221, 224, or their 

equivalents; at least eight credits in French literature beyond 217. 

Spanish— Thirty-six credits, including Spanish 153, 215 or 216, 217, 221, 223, 224, or 

their equivalents; eight credits from 225, 226, 227; at least four additional credits 

in literature. 



89 



> French and Spanish— Fifty-six credits, including French 153x, 216, 217, 221, 222, and 

j 224, plus Spanish 153x; either 215 or 216; 219; 221; either 223 or 224; and eight credits 

, from 225, 226, 227, or their equivalents. 
German— Thirty-two credits, including German 153, 211, 212; eight credits from Ger- 

j' man 217, 218, 219, 220; at least twelve credits in German literature beyond 212. 

r Latin— The requirements are the same as those for the major in Latin. 

. Intermediate Education— Forty-two credits, including appropriate basic and divisional 

. course requirements; eight credits in language arts; eight credits in social studies; 

c eight credits in science; eight credits in mathematics (four may be in computer 
science); four credits in music; four credits in art; two credits in physical educa- 

I rion. Remaining certification requirements are obtained through intermediate educa- 

„ tion courses and an academic concentration in one of the teaching areas of the in- 

I termediate grades. 
Mathematics- Forty credits, including Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 221, 231, 332; 

, at least eight credits from other 300-level courses. 

jMusic-Forty-eight credits, including Music 171, 172, 173, 174, 181, 182, 186, 187, 188; 

' Education 280, 282, 284, 289, and 291. 

. Physical Education and Health— Forty-three credits, including Physical Education 220, 

■ 221, 222, 224, 230, 240, 250, 353, 357, 360, 363; Biology 111 and 150. 

_ Science— Ten credits each in biology, chemistry, and physics; eight credits in 

r ' mathematics; additional work in the area of concentration: biology (twenty credits), 
chemistry (twenty credits), or physics (seventeen credits). For certification in the 
individual fields of science, the following are required: biology (thirty credits), 
chemistry (thirty credits), or physics (twenty-seven credits). 

. Social Studies— Forty-eight credits, including twenty-four credits in history, with at 

. least six to eight credits in United States history and six to eight credits in world 
(European) history; twenty credits from politics, sociology, anthropology, or 
economics, with no more than eight credits in any one area; and four credits in 

l geography. For certification in the individual fields of the social studies, the follow- 

. ing are required: economics (twenty-four credits), politics (twenty-four credits), 
history (twenty-four credits, with at least six to eight credits in United States history 
and six to eight credits in world [European] history), and sociology (twenty-four 

; credits). 

, Speech Communicat ion— Forty-four credits, including Speech Communication 121, 151 

{ or 152, 153, 155 or 376, 161, 231, 252 or S355, 261, and 241 or 245 or 283, 284, and 
two 300-level speech communication electives. 

Theatre Arts— Forty to forty-two credits, including Speech Communication 121, 151,. 
223, 231, 226, 227, 283, 284, 332 or S324, and 327 or 328; English 329 or 323 or 369; 
Physical Education 162. 

Speech and Theatre— Fifty credits, including Speech Communication 121 or 241 or 
245, 151 or 152, 153, 155, or 376, 161 or 227, 231, 223, 226, 252 or S355, 261, 283, 284, 
321, 322. 

Education courses required for a secondary or special subject certificate are Educa- 
tion 201, 202, or 203, 211, 214, 251, 291, and 383. Education courses required for an 
intermediate certificate are Education 201, 202 or 203, 211, 221, 222, 251, 271, 293, 
295, 296, 313, and 383. A minor in educational studies requires Education 201, 211, 



90 



303, 304, 313, and Education 393 or 214. A minor in professional education requin 
Education 201, 202 or 203, 211, 214, 251, 291, and 383. 



201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological four 
dations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. 

202 or 203. School Practicum. (2) Assigned experiences in elementary and secor 
dary schools. Weekly seminar. Pass/Fail only. 

211. Educational Psychology. (4) The theories, processes, and conditions of effe< 
tive teaching/learning. P— Education 201 or permission of instructor. 

214. The School and Teaching. (4) Organization of the school system; bases of edua 
tion; the curriculum; major problems of education and teaching; the role of th 
teacher; psychological aspects of teaching. P— Education 201 and permission c 
instructor. 

221. Children's Literature and Reading. (4) A survey of the types of literature ap 
propriate for the intermediate grades and an investigation of the basic problem 
in reading. 

222. The Arts in the Intermediate Grades. (4) The development of skills in musi 
and fine arts, appropriate to the intermediate grades. 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develop 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher an 
an understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for th 
grade level. 

251. Student Teaching. (6) Observation and experience in school-related activities 
Supervised student teaching. Pass/Fail only. P— Education 201 and permission c 
instructor. 

252. Student Teaching. (2) Observation and experience in the Primary Grades K-: 
Pass/Fail. P— Permission of instructor. 

271. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study of the physical environment and it 
relationship to man, including an examination of climate, soils, water resources 
and land forms found in various regions throughout the world. 

272. Geography Study Tour. (4) A guided tour of selected areas to study physical 
economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Backgroum 
references for reading are suggested prior to the tour. 

280. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestra and wind band instruments, hov 
composers have used them throughout history, and the development of practice 
scoring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P— Music 174, 184. 

282. Conducting. (4) A study of choral and instrumental conducting techniques 
including practical experience with ensembles. Offered in alternate years. P— Musi 
174, 184. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an examina 
tion of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P— Music 174, 184 
and permission of instructor. 



91 



289. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental tech- 
niques. Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, choral and 
instrumental repertoire, marching band, and instrumental problems. P— Music 101 

or 102 or permission of instruction. 
j 
f 291. Methods and Materials. (4) Methods, materials, and techniques used in 

teaching the various subjects. P— Education 201 and permission of instructor. 

Teaching of English. Fall. 
I Teaching of Foreign Language. Spring. 

Teaching of Mathematics. Spring. 

Teaching of Music. Fall. 
I Teaching of Physical Education and Health. Spring. 

Teaching of Science. Fall. 

Teaching of Social Studies. Fall. 

Teaching of Speech Communication. Spring. 

Teaching of Theatre Arts. Fall. 



292. Primary Methods. (4) Classroom organization, teaching strategies, and materials 
! appropriate to subjects taught in grades K-3. P— Permission of instructor. 

293. Intermediate School Curriculum: Theory and Practice. (3) General principles 
jof curriculum construction and teaching methods. Introduction to the use of 
i audiovisual materials and equipment. 

195. Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies. (4) 

A. survey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching the language 
iarts and social studies in the intermediate grades. P— Permission of instructor. 

; 296. Methods and Materials for Teaching Science and Mathematics. (4) A survey 
of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching science and mathematics 
n the intermediate grades. P— Permission of instructor. 

301. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the field of audiovisual education; 
development and application of skills in the use of instructional materials, equip- 
ment, and programs. 

302. Production of Instructional Methods. (4) Methods of producing instructional 
-materials and other technological techniques. P— Education 301. 

J03. History of Western Education. (4) Educational theory and practice from an- 
ient times through the modern period, including American education. 

J04. Theories of Education. (4) Contemporary proposals for educational theory and 
practice studied in the context of social issues. 

J06. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Education. (4) A study of selected 
listorical eras, influential thinkers, or crucial problems in education. Topics announc- 
ed annually. 

313. Human Growth and Development. (4) A study of the intellectual, emotional, 
and physical components of growth from birth to adolescence, with special con- 
:ern for the educational implications of this process. 



92 



323. Educational Statistics. (4) Descriptive, inferential, and nonparametric statistical 
procedures involved in educational research. Not open to students who have taken 
Psychology 211 and 212. P— Permission of instructor. 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy, 
theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and development counseling 
approaches in guidance and personnel work in education, business, and community 
service agencies. 

383. Reading in the Content Areas. (2) The course provides an introduction to 
teaching the basic reading skills at the intermediate and secondary level; vocabulary, 
comprehension, reading rate, selection of texts, and critical and interpretive reading. 
Particularly stressed are diagnoses of reading problems and techniques for correcting 
these problems in specific subject content areas. 

390. Education of Exceptional Persons. (4) A survey of the types of exceptionality. 
Emphasis will be placed on characteristics, identification, educational program- 
ming, mangagment, and evaluation. 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (4) An investigation of theory and practice pertinent to 
teachers of the gifted. 

392. The Psychology of the Gifted Child. (4) A discussion of giftedness and creativi- 
ty in children and the relationship of those characteristics to adult superior perfor- 
mance. Topics to be covered include a history of the study of precocity, methods 
and problems of identification, the relationship of giftedness and creativity, per- 
sonality characteristics and social-emotional problems of gifted children, and the 
social implications of studying giftedness. 




93 



:)3. Individual Study. (2, 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available 
sl the Department of Education. Permitted upon departmental approval of peti- 
3n presented by a qualified student. 

' )4. Internship in Education of the Gifted. (4) An intensive period of observation 
^id instruction of gifted students. Readings and directed reflection upon the 
I assroom experience will be used to develop a richer understanding of such a special 
:hool setting. 



fl English 

r 

Robert N. Shorter, Chairman 

Professors John A. Carter Jr., Doyle R. Fosso, Thomas F. Gossett, 

lizabeth Phillips, Lee Harris Potter, Robert N. Shorter, Edwin Graves Wilson 

Professor of Journalism Bynum Shaw 

Associate Professors Nancy J. Cotton, Andrew V. Ettin, W. Dillon Johnston, 

Robert W. Lovett, William M. Moss 

Assistant Professor James S. Hans 

Visiting Assistant Professors Cynthia L. Caywood, Barry G. Maine, 

it Gillian R. Overing 

I Lecturers Patricia A. Johansson, Dolly A. McPherson 

d Visiting Lecturer Robert A. Hedin 

Instructors Carol Gardner, William J. Hartley, Robert E. Mielke, 

Emily P. Miller 

The major in English requires a minimum of forty credits, at least thirty-two of 
hich must be in advanced language and literature courses numbered 300 to 399. 
lese courses must include Shakespeare, two additional courses in British literature 
?fore 1800, one course in American literature, and, early in the major, one seminar, 
ajors and their advisers plan individual programs to meet these requirements and 
include work in the major literary types. 

A minor in English requires English 160 or 165 and English 170 or 175, plus five 

Ivanced language and literature courses. Each minor will be assigned an adviser 

the English department who will plan with the student a program of study. 

The prerequisite for all 300-level courses in English is any one of the courses in 

"itish and American literature numbered 160, 165, 170, and 175, all of which are 

fered each semester. Additional courses in journalism and writing are offered by 

e department as related subjects but do not count toward an English major; they 

ay be taken as electives regardless of the field of study in which a student majors. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply in the second 

mester of their junior year for admission to the honors program in English. To 

j aduate with "Honors in English," students must have a minimum grade point 

rerage of 3.5 in the major and 3.0 in all course work and must satisfy the re- 

lirements for English 388 during their senior year. Interested students may con- 

ilt departmental faculty members for further information. 



r< 



94 



Lower Division Courses 

11. Composition Review. (0) A tutorial in the essentials of standard usage and the 
basic principles of composition. 

105. English Fundamentals. (2) Training in the fundamentals of written English. 
Satisfactory completion required for entry into English 110. Admission by placement 
only; does not satisfy the basic composition requirement. 

*110. English Composition. (4) Training in expository writing; frequent essays based 
upon readings. 

*112. English Composition and Literature. (4) Training in expository writing based 
on the reading of literature. P— Permission of department. 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (4) Eight to ten writers representing different 
periods and genres. 

165. Studies in Major British Writers. (4) Three to five writers representing different 
periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited enrollment. P— 
Permission of department. 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (4) Nine to eleven writers representing 
different periods and genres. 

175. Studies in Major American Writers. (4) Three to five writers representing dif- 
ferent periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited enroll- 
ment. P— Permission of department. 

180. Traditions of Humanity: The Liberal Arts. (2) A study of major concepts of 
liberal education in the Western world. 

210. Advanced Composition. (4) Study of prose models of exposition; frequent 
papers and individual conferences. Enrollment limited. 

225. Reading Short Fiction. (2) Selected readings from the genre of short fiction 
designed to increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

226. Reading the Novel. (2) Selected readings from the genre of the novel design- 
ed to increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

227. Reading Poetry. (2) Selected readings from the genre of poetry designed to 
increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

228. Reading Drama. (2) Selected readings from the genre of drama designed to 
increase students' appreciation and pleasure. 

245. Literary Approaches to Film. (2) The study of film as a literary genre, with 
special attention given to narrative, theme, and structure. Students will apply 
methods and principles of literary criticism to selected films. 

299. Individual Study. (2-4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 
By prearrangement. 



*Either 110 or Ml is a prerequisite for all other courses in English unless the basic requirement is waived. 
Either course fulfills the basic requirement. 



95 



Journalism Courses 

170. Introduction to Journalism. (4) Survey of the fundamental principles of news- 
fathering and news-writing; study of news and news values, with some attention 
to representative newspapers. 

1 172. Editing. (4) A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, typography, 
ind make-up; practice on Video Display Terminal. P— English 270. 

5 >76. Advanced Journalism. (4) Intensive practice in writing various types of 
lewspaper stories, including the feature article. Limited to students planning careers 
in journalism. P— English 270. 

>78. History of Journalism. (4) A study of the development of American journalism 
jind its English origins; detailed investigations of representative world newspapers. 

584. The Essay. (2) Primarily for those interested in writing for publication, with 
-concentration on writing various types of essays. 

r 

Writing Courses 

li 

!85. Poetry Workshop. (2) A laboratory course in the writing of verse. Study of poetic 
echniques and forms as well as works of contemporary poets. Frequent individual 
conferences. 

186. Short Story Workshop. (2) A study of the fundamental principles of short fic- 
ion writing; practice in writing; extensive study of short story form. P— Permission 
if instructor. 

183, 384. Theory and Practice of Verse Writing. (4, 4) Emphasis on reading and 
iiscussing student poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. 

Advanced Language and Literature Courses 

1 100. Seminar in the Major. (4) Selected topics in British and American literature, 
ntensive practice in critical discourse, including discussion, oral reports, and short 
assays. Introduction to literary scholarship and research methodology leading to 
i documented paper. Required for all majors. 

101. Individual Authors. (2) Study of selected work from an important American 
>r British author. May be repeated. 

'02. Ideas in Literature. (2) Study of a significant literary theme in selected works. 
4ay be repeated. 

•04. History of the English Language. (4) A survey of the development of English 
. yntax, morphology, and phonology from Old English to the present, with atten- 
ion to vocabulary growth. 

11. The Legend of Arthur. (4) The origin and development of the Arthurian legend 
n France and England, with emphasis on the works of Chretien de Troyes and Sir 
Tiomas Malory. 



P 



96 



315. Chaucer. (3 or 4) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyd 
with some attention to minor poems. Consideration of literary, social, religious, an 
philosophical background. 

320. British Drama to 1642. (4) British drama from its beginning to 1642, exclusiv 
of Shakespeare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and Jacobea 
tragedies, comedies, and tragicomedies. 

323. Shakespeare. (4) Thirteen representative plays illustrating Shakespeare 
development as a poet and dramatist. 

325. Sixteenth Century British Literature. (4) Concentration on the poetry c 
Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Wyatt, and Drayton, with particular attention to sor 
nets and The Faerie Queene. 

327. Milton. (4) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasis o 
Paradise Lost. 

328. Seventeenth Century British Literature. (4) Poetry of Donne, Herbert, Vaughar 
Marvel, Crashaw, prose of Bacon, Burton, Browne, Walton. Consideration c 
religious, political, and scientific backgrounds. 

330. British Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (4) Representative poetry an 
prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700-1800, drawn from Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swif 
Pope, Johnson, and Boswell. Consideration of cultural backgrounds and significar 
literary trends. 

332. Satire. (4) The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as revealed throug 
reading and critical analysis of significant examples, mostly British and Americar 

335. Eighteenth Century British Fiction. (4) Primarily the fiction of Defo< 
Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 

336. Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Drama. (4) British drama fror 
1660 to 1780, including representative plays by Dryden, Etherage, Wycherle; 
Congreve, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

338. British Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century. (4) A study of the period 
interest in the exotic, the gothic, the oriental, and the medieval. Authors includ 
Goldsmith, Burns, Walpole, and Burke. 

340. Studies in Women and Literature. (4) A. The woman writer in society. I 
Feminist critical approaches to literature. 

350. British Romantic Poets. (4) A review of the beginnings of Romanticism in Britis 
literature, followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelle) 
collateral reading in the prose of the period. 

353. Nineteenth Century British Fiction. (4) Representative major works by Dicken: 
Eliot, Thackeray, Hardy, the Bronte, and others. 

354. Victorian Poetry. (4) A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and Arnol 
or another Victorian poet. 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (4) Selected topics, such as development c 



97 



genres, major authors and texts, and cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fic- 
tion, autobiography, and other prose. 

>62. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of the poetry 
H Blake, Yeats, and Dylan Thomas; study of the plays of Yeats and his contem- 
poraries in the Irish Renaissance, especially Synge and Lady Gregory. 

164. Studies in Literary Criticism. (4) Consideration of certain figures and schools 
%t thought significant in the history of literary criticism. 

65. Twentieth Century British Fiction. (4) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, 
brster, Woolf, and later British writers, with attention to their social and intellec- 
tual backgrounds. 

67. Twentieth Century Poetry. (4) Selected American and British poets from 1900 
to 1965. 

68. Studies in Irish Literature. (4) Critical readings of the works of major Irish 
%riters within the context of the political, social, and literary history of Ireland. 

69. Modern Drama. (4) Main currents in modern drama from nineteenth century 
taturalism and symbolism through expressionism and absurdism, including 

-epresentative plays by Shaw, O'Neill, Williams, and Pinter. 

72. American Romanticism. (4) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, including 
xnerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. 

76. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. (4) Readings from at least two of the follow- 
ig poets; Whitman, Dickinson, Melville. 



s78. Literature of the American South. (4) A study of Southern literature from its 
eginnings to the present, with emphasis upon such major writers as Tate, Warren, 
aulkner, O'Connor, Welty, and Styron. 

- 80. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (4) Such writers as Twain, James, Howells, 
iane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Gather. 

81. Studies in Black American Literature. (4) Reading and critical analysis of 
elected fiction, poetry drama, and other writing by representative black Americans. 

82. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. (4) To include such writers as 
ewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, Katherine Anne 
'orter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. 

86. Directed Reading. (2-4) A tutorial in the area of study not otherwise provid- 
L d by the department; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented 
y a qualified student. 

88. Honors in English. (4) A conference course centering upon a special reading 
?quirement and a thesis requirement. For senior students wishing to graduate with 
Honors in English." 

39. The Use of the Library in Literary Research. (2) Attention to materials, methods, 
nd bibliography for the study of literature. 

90. The Structure of English. (4) An introduction to the principles and 



V 



98 

techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English. 

395. Contemporary American Literature. (4) A study of post-World War II America: 
poetry and fiction by such writers as Bellow, Gass, Barth, Pynchon, Lowell, Ashbery 
Ammons, Bishop, and Rich. 

German 

Wilmer D. Sanders, Chairman 

Professors Ralph S. Fraser, James C. O'Flaherty, Wilmer D. Sanders 

Associate Professors Timothy F. Sellner, Larry E. West 

A major in German requires thirty-seven credits beyond German 111, 112. These 
must include German 218 and should include 281 and 285. A minor in Germar 
requires five courses beyond German 153, one of which must be German 218. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission tc 
the honors program in German. To be graduated with the designation "Honon 
in German," they must complete a senior research project and pass a comprehen 
sive examination. For additional information members of the departmental facult) 
should be consulted. 

There is an exchange program with the Free University of Berlin. 

Ill, 112. Elementary German. (4, 4) This course covers the principles of grammei 
and pronunciation and includes the reading of simple texts. Lab— one hour. 

153. Intermediate German. (5) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading 
of selected prose and poetry. Lab— one hour. P— German 111, 112. 

153x. Intermediate German. (4) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading 
of selected prose and poetry. Lab— one hour. P— Three years of high school German 

160. German Language and Customs. (4) Students spend one month in four dif- 
ferent regions of Germany and Austria in a program designed to provide constant! 
exposure to the language, customs, geography, and art of these countries. They at-. 
tend daily language classes as well as lectures and cultural events. They are required] 
to keep a journal in German. Pass/Fail. Offered in summer. P— German 112. 

211, 212. Introduction to German Literature. (4, 4) The object of this course is tc 
acquaint the student with masterpieces of German literature. Parallel reading anc 
reports. P— German 153 or equivalent. 

217. Conversation and Phonetics. (4) A course in spoken German emphasizing 
facility of expression. Considerable attention is devoted to phonetics. P— Germar 
153 or equivalent. 

218. Composition and Grammar Review. (4) A review of the fundamentals of Ger- 
man grammar with intensive practice in translation and composition. Required foi 
majors. P— German 153 or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Composition. (4) A study of advanced grammar and composition. 
English texts translated into German in addition to free compostiion in German. 
P— German 218 or equivalent. 



99 



220. German Civilization. (4) A survey of contemporary German culture, including 
, a study of its historical development in broad outline. The course is conducted in 
B German. P— German 153 or equivalent. 

231. Weimar Germany. (4) Historical and literary examination of Weimar Germany, 
1919-1933. Authors included Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenger, Hesse, Brecht, 
Kafka, Tucholsky, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or history credit determined 
at registration. 

240. Modern Masterworks in Translation. (2) Examination and interpretation of the 
writing of an outstanding author of modern German literature (e.g., Brecht, Grass, 
Kafka, Rilke). Does not count toward a major or minor in German. 

, 249. Old High German and Middle High German Literature. (4) The study of ma- 
; jor writers and works from these two areas; emphasizes major writings of the 
chivalric period. P— German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

-250. Renaissance, Reformation, and Baroque German Literature. (4) A study of 
^major writers and works from the post-chivalric period to approximately 1700. P— 
I German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

253. Eighteenth Century German Literature. (4) A study of major writers and works 
of the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang. P— German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

1 263. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century I. (4) Poetry, prose, dramas, and 
critical works from approximately 1795 to 1848. P— German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

1 264. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century II. (4) Readings from the begin- 
nings of Poetic Realism to the advent of Naturalism. P— German 211, 212, or 

J equivalent. 




V 



100 

270. Individual Study. (3 or 4) Studies in literature not ordinarily read in other 
courses. P— German 211, 212, and permission of instructor. 

281. Seminar: Twentieth Century Prose. (4) Intensive study of certain works by 
Thomas Mann, Hesse, and Kafka, plus considerable outside reading. P— German 
211, 212, or equivalent. 

285. Seminar in Goethe. (4) Faust, Part I studied in class. Parallel readings in other 
works by Goethe assigned. P— German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

287, 288. Honors in German. (3, 3) A conference course in German literature. A 
major research paper is required. Designed for candidates for departmental honors. 



History 

Richard C. Barnett, Chairman 

Worrell Professor of Anglo American Studies James Ralph Scales 

Professors Richard C. Barnett, Cyclone Covey, 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, J. Edwin Hendricks, Thomas E. Mullen, 

Percival Perry, David L. Smiley, Henry Smith Stroupe, Lowell R. Tillett, 

W. Buck Yearns, Richard L. Zuber 

Associate Professors James P. Barefield, Merrill G. Berthrong, David W. Hadley, 

Michael L. Sinclair, J. Howell Smith, Alan J. Williams 

Lecturer Negley Boyd Harte (London) 

Visiting Assistant Professors Victor Kamendrowsky, Anne Parrella 

The major in history consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits and must include 
History 310, from six to eight credits in European history, three or four credits in 
non-Western history, and from six to eight credits in American history. One of the 
American history courses must be 151, 152, or 153. 

A minor in history requires twenty-four credits. 

Highly qualified majors should apply for admission to the honors program in 
history. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in History," the student must 
complete satisfactorily History 287 and 288. For additional information, members 
of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students contemplating graduate study should take historiography and should 
acquire a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (preferably French, 
German, or Russian) for the MA degree and two for the PhD degree. 

101. The Rise of the West. (4) A survey of ancient, medieval, and early modern 
history to 1700. 

102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (4) A survey of modern Europe 
from 1700 to the present. 

131. European Historical Biography. (2) Study of biographies of men and women 
who have influenced the history and civilization of Europe. 



101 

! 151, 152. The United States. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects. 
151 : before 1865; 152: after 1865. Students who take History 153 may not take either 
of these courses for credit. 

]i 153. The United States. (4) A topical survey combining 151 and 152. Not open to 
students who take either 151 or 152. 

f 160. Freud. (4) An investigation of Freud's basic ideas in the context of his time. 
Books to be read include The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and its Discontents, 
and Jones' biography in the Trilling abridgement. 

211. Colloquium. (1-4) 

215, 216. The Ancient World. (4, 3 or 4) Critical focus on the Greeks in the fall and 
Romans in the spring, but in global context of paleolithic to medieval; 
psychological/philosophical emphasis. 

221. The Middle Ages. (4) A survey of European history, 400-1300, stressing social 
i and cultural developments. 

224. The Reformation. (2) Europe in the age of the Reformation. 

2260. History of London. (4) Topographical, social, economic, and political history 
of London from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museum 
visits and lectures, and on-site inspections. Offered in London. 

1 2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2) Burgundian society, culture, and govern- 
ment in the reigns of Philip the Bold, John the Fearless, Philip the Good, and Charles 
the Rash, 1384-1477. Offered in Dijon. 

2263. Venetian Society and Culture. (4) An examination of Venetian society, in- 
, eluding the role within Venetian life of music, theatre, the church, and civic ritual. 

1 231. Weimar Germany. (4) Historical and literary examination of Weimar Germany, 
J 1919-1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenger, Hesse, Brecht, 

Kafka, Tucholsky, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or history credit determined 

at registration. 
i 

232. European Historical Novels. (2) Study of the accuracy and value, from the 

j stand-point of the historian, of a selection of historical novels. 

238. Twentieth Century Europe. (4) Advent of modernism, World Wars I and II, 
" totalitarianism, the Cold War, and Europe in the post-European era. 

240. Afro-American History. (4) The role of Afro-Americans in the development 
of the United States, with particular attention to African heritage, forced migration, 
. Americanization, and influence. 



264. Economic History of the United States. (3) The economic development of the 
United States from colonial beginnings to the present. 

265. American Diplomatic History. (4) An introduction to the history of American 
diplomacy since 1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundamental 
policies. 



fr 



102 






270. Oral History. (4) How to research family and community history with the tape 
recorder. 

271. Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825. (4) Cultural configurational approach. 

287, 288. Honors in History. (4, 4) 287: seminar on problems of historical synthesis 
and interpretation; 288: writing of a major paper and examination on a special field. 

310. Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their choice. A 
paper is required. 

311, 312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. (4, 4) Intellectual trends 
in Western European civilization. 311: seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; 312: 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Not offered in '84-'85. 

316. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (4) The struc- 
ture of society, the nature of law, church/state relations, and intellectual 
developments. P— History 221 or permission of instructor. 

319, 320. Germany. (4, 4) 319: origins of the German nation and the rise of Prussia 
in a context of particularism; 320: from Bismarck to divided Germany. 

321, 322. France. (4, 4) 321: from prehistoric Gaul to 1788, with particular emphasis 
on the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; 322: 1788 to the present. 

323, 324. England. (4, 4) A political and social survey, with some attention to Con- 
tinental movements. 323: to 1603; 324: 1603 to present. 

325. Tudor and Early Stuart England. (4) A constitutional and social study of 
England from 1485 to 1641. 

329, 330. Modern England. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and cultural histor 
of England since 1714. 329: to 1815; 330: since 1815. 

331, 332. Russia. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and cultural history of Russia. 
331: the Russian empire; 332: the Soviet Union. 

333. European Diplomacy, 1848-1914. (4) The diplomacy of the great powers, with 
some attention given to the role of publicity in international affairs. Topics include 
the unification of Italy and of Germany, the Bismarckian system, and the coming 
of World War I. 

335, 336. Italy. (4, 4) 335: medieval and Renaissance Italy to 1529; 336: 1529 to the 
present. 

341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history and culture 
of Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to 
economic, social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the 
emergence of new nation-states. 

342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major 
subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Per- 
sians under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence 
of the modern Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese 



103 

society to 1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing 
continuity and resistance to change. 

344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
. challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Communists, 
I Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the history 

and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in the social, 

economic, and cultural life of the area. 
i 
. 347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of images 

of India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and philosophical 

ideas, art, polity society, and culture. 
I 

348. Modern Japan. (4) Tokugawa era; Meiji Restoration; industrialization and ur- 
banization; relations with the West; World War II; occupation; Japan in the con- 
temporary world. 

J49, 350. East Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and political 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. 349: to 1600; 350: since 1600. 

rJ51, 352. American Society and Thought. (4, 4) A non-political topical survey of 
\merican culture and lifestyles. Topics include religion, science, education, architec- 
ure, and immigration. 

553. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. (4) Determinative episodes, figures, 
allegiance, apperceptions, and results of the period, organically considered. 

[ $54 Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763-1815. (4) The American Revolu- 
ion, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the new nation. 

1 555. The Westward Movement. (4) The role of the frontier in United States history, 
1763-1890. 

'i}56. Jacksonian America, 1815-1850. (4) The United States in the age of Jackson, 
-Clay Calhoun, and Webster. A biographical approach. 
n 
557. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (4) The political and military events of the 

var and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 
i 

158. The United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (4) National progress 
ind problems during an era of rapid industrialization. 

159. The United States from Versailles through World War II. (4) The transition 
; )f America from World War I to 1945, with special emphasis on the significance 

)f the New Deal and World War II. 

160. The United States since World War II. (4) Trends and changes in the nation 
rom World War II to the present. 

*62. American Constitutional History. (4) Origins of the Constitution, the controver- 
sies involving the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments to meet 
he new American industrialism. 









104 

363, 364. The South. (4, 4) Geography, population elements, basic institutions, an 
selected events. 

365. Women in American History. (4) A survey of the roles and activities of wome 
in America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. 

366. Studies in Historic Preservation. (4) An analysis of history museums and ager 
cies and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history through artifact: 
restorations, and reconstructions. P— Permission of instructor. 

367. 368. North Carolina. (4, 4) Selected phases of the development of North Carolin 
from the colonial beginnings to the present. 367: to 1789; 368: since 1789. 

369. The American Military Experience. (4) A survey of the military ideas and a< 
tivities of the American people and their armed forces, with emphasis on the rek 
tionship between war and society. 

391, 392. Historiography. (4, 3) The principal historians and their writings fror 
ancient times to the present. 391: European historiography; 392: America 
historiography. 

398. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available i 
the department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented b 
a qualified student. 

399. Directed Reading. (1-4) Concentrated reading in an area of study not othei 
wise available. P— Permission of instructor. 



Humanities 

N. Rick Heatley, Coordinator 

121. Introduction to Women's Studies. (4) An interdisciplinary course, taught b 
faculty representing at least two fields, that integrates materials from the humanitie 
and the social sciences. Topics include methods and goals of women's studies 
feminist critical theory, and the place of women in culture and society. 

Humanities courses 213-218 are designed to introduce students to European an 
Latin American works of literature which would not be included in their norma 
course of study. Each course includes a reading in translation of ten to twelv 
representative authors as indicated below. 

213. Studies in European Literature. (4) Texts studied are by such authors a 
Dante, Montaigne, Cervantes, Goethe, Dostoevsky and Camus. Satisfies a Divi 
sion I requirement. 

214. Contemporary Fiction. (4) Texts studied are by such authors as Mann, Sartrt 
Unamuno, Fuentes, Moravia, and Voinovich. Satisfies a Division I requirement 

215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (4) Texts studied are by such authors a 
Hoffmann, Kafka, Dostoevsky, Dinesen, Ibsen, Pushkin, and Chekhov. Satisife 
a Division I requirement. 









105 

5 216. Romance Literature. (4) Texts studied are by such authors as Boccaccio, 
Calderon, Flaubert, Machado de Assis, Gide, and Lampedusa. Satisfies a Divi- 
j sion I requirement. 

I 217. European Drama. (4) Texts studied are by such authors as Moliere, Garcia- 
U Lorca, Pirandello, Schiller, Brecht, Ibsen, and Beckett. Satisfies a Division I 
I requirement. 

218. Eastern European Literature. (4) Texts studied are by such authors as Tolstoi, 
j Solzhenitsyn, Gogol, Andric, Milosc, and Szabo. Satisfies a Division I 
requirement. 

umanities 373, 374, 375, 378 also satisfy the Division I requirement. 

»0. Discovering the Visual and Verbal Modes of the Twentieth Century. (4) An 

cploration of the ideas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of 
rpresentative twentieth century figures: Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, Kafka, Leger, 
bckett, Klee, Ionesco, Pollock, Faulkner, Chagall, Barth, and others. 

i5. Twentieth Century Issues in the Arts. (4) An interdisciplinary investigation 
• twentieth century issues in the arts, taught by art, music, and theatre faculty; 
J pics change yearly; participation by local, regional, and national authorities in 

ie arts. P— Art 103, or Music 101 or 102, or Theatre Arts 121, or permission of 
r structor. 

\2. Public Life and the Liberal Arts. (4) The course will be devoted to topics of 
)iding public significance. Fundamental dilemmas and resolutions associated with 
ich topic will be examined through a consideration of their treatment in the liberal 
ts tradition. The visiting scholars of the Tocqueville Forum will supplement the 
ass discussion. "Politics and the Arts" and "Theory and Practice in Public Life" 
e representative topics. 

!1. Seminar in Women's Studies. (4) Consideration of theoretical and 
Methodological questions and research on current topics in women's studies. 

M). Race in the Southern Experience before Emancipation: Four Voices. (1) Selected 
ritings of David Walker, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet 
eecher Stowe. Pass/Fail only. (Credit not given for Humanities 340 if the student 
^as completed Humanities 341.) 

,U. Race, Politics, and Literature: Aspects of American Life from 1830 to 1930. 

:) An examination of the evolution of significant ideas in American civilization, 
careful reading of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, W. E. DuBois, Mark 
'»vain, and others. Offered in the fall. 

W. African Culture and Its Impact on the US. (1) A condensed version of 
umanities 345, offered as a minicourse in the spring. Pass/Fail only. (Credit not 
iven for Humanities 344 if the student has completed Humanities 345.) 

15. African Culture and Its Impact on the US. (4) The influence of African culture 
n American life will be studied in such areas as dance, music, political approaches, 
rammatical patterns, literature, and culinary preferences. The course will include 
i evaluation of American mores. Offered in the fall. 



106 



350. What the Arts Have Been Saying since 1800. (4) An experiment in developi* 
interpretive judgment and insight regarding music, painting, and literature as - 
ticulations of the frontier consciousness of the period. 

352. The Classical and Surreal Tradition. (4) A venture to define and differenti » 
classical and surreal modes of perception throughout history, their paradoxical re- 
tionship to each other and to complementary styles, considered in philosophy, mu;, 
literature, and painting. 

358. An Editor Looks at the Rights of American Citizens, 1965-Present. (2, 3, t 

4) Current developments in the field of constitutional rights as seen by a newspap - 
editor. 

373. France in the Thirties: Literature and Social Consciousness. (4) A study i 
English of Malraux, Giraudoux, Celine, Bernanos, and St. Exupery. Satisfies a Di • 
sion I requirement. 

374. French Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century. (4) A study of the literati! 
of the forties and fifties and its evolution from "commitment" to "disengagemen 
Authors include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet, Genet, and Duras. Satisf;; 
a Division I requirement. 

375. The French Theatre between 1920 and 1960: Theory and Practice. (4) Stu' 
of works by Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, ai 
Genet. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

378. Evolution of Autobiography as a Literary Form. (4) A study of autobiograp 
as a form of fiction. Reading of Rousseau's Confessions and selected autobiographi 
of twentieth century French authors. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

379. The Literary Works of Jean-Paul Sartre. (4) A critical study of Sartre's evol 
tion as reflected in his novels and plays from Nausea to The Prisoners of Altona 

380. Albert Camus. (3) A critical study of Camus' evolution as a writer. 

Interdisciplinary Honors 
Paul M. Gross Jr., Coordinator 

A series of seminar courses of an interdisciplinary nature is open to qualifii 
undergraduates. Students interested in admission to any one of these seminaj 
supervised by the Committee on Honors, should consult the coordinator or 
member of the committee. 

Students who choose to participate in as many as four interdisciplinary semina 
and who have a superior record may elect Honors 281, directed study culminatu 
in an honors paper and an oral examination. Those whose work has been superi 
in this course and who have achieved an overall grade point average of at least : 
in all college work may be graduated with the distinction "Honors in the Arts ar 
Sciences." Students who choose to be candidates for departmental honors may n 
also be candidates for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Able students are normally encouraged to choose a departmental honors pr 
gram rather than "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." As a result, most studen 



107 

wet to participate in only one or two interdisciplinary seminars in which they are 
iticularly interested. The faculty participants for these seminars represent diverse 
: demic disciplines. 

t, 132. Approaches to Human Experience I. (4, 4) An inquiry into the nature and 
;rrelationships of several approaches to human experience, represented by the 
rrk of three such minds as Leonardo da Vinci, Dante, Klee, Lorenz, Confucius, 
| stoevsky Descartes, Goya, Mozart, Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion based 
t primary and secondary sources, including musical works and paintings. Writ- 
it reports and a term paper required. Offered in alternate years. 

I , 134. Approches to Human Experience II. (4, 4) A parallel course to Honors 
I, 132, concentrating on the work of a different set of figures such as Einstein, 
Hileo, Keynes, Pascal, Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, Stravinsky, Sophocles, and Bach. 
\ ered in alternate years. 

». Darwinism and the Modern World. (4) A study of the Darwinian theory 
I evolution and the impact of evolution and evolutionary thought on fields such 
^economics, politics, psychology, literature and the other arts, and philosophy. 

i L The Ideal Society. (4) Man's effort to establish or imagine the ideal community, 
fate, or society; principles of political and social organization; changing goals and 
j ues. 

\ '. The Scientific Outlook. (4) An exploration of the origins and development 
rhe scientific method and some of its contemporary applications in the natural 
xi social sciences and the humanities. 

! >. Romanticism. (4) Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic of mind and art 
, i as a specific historical movement in Europe and America in the late eighteenth 
f i nineteenth centuries. Emphasis on primary materials in philosophy, literature, 
sic, and painting. 

1 9. Man and the Irrational. (4) The phenomenon of the irrational, with emphasis 
: its twentieth century manifestations but with attention also to its presence in 
: er centuries and cultures. Philosophy, religion, literature, psychology, politics, 
: 1 the arts are explored. 

1 0. Adventures in Self-Understanding. (4) Examinations and discussion of signifi- 
'.' t accounts of the quest for understanding of the self, in differing historical periods, 
: tural contexts, and genres. Among figures who may be discussed are Augustine, 
1 rite, Gandhi, Montaigne, Descartes, Pascal, and selected modern writers. 

1 1. The Tragic View. (4) The theory of tragedy in ancient and modern times; the 
I session of the tragic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

1 2. The Comic View. (4) The theory of comedy in ancient and modern times; 
I expression of the comic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

\ 



'e or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors. 



108 

*244. Man and the Structure of the Universe. (4) An investigation of various n. 
ceptions of the universe and their implications for man. Study not necessarily lined 
to the cosmologies of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and their modern successors, but av 
also include theories such as the Babylonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

*246. Man and the Environment. (4) An interdisciplinary examination of man id 
society in relation to the environment. 

*247. The Mythic View. (4) The nature of myth through creation and hero m)n, 
the uses to which myths have been put in different historical periods; various mcum 
explanations of myth (literary, religious, anthropological, psychoanalytic, social, id 
historical). 

*248. The Ironic View. (4) An investigation of the ironic view of life in literati, 
art, history, theatre, and film. 

250. Ethical Dilemmas in the Arts and Sciences. (4) An exploration of contempcry 
issues and controversies in the sciences and art, particularly those involved itfi 
ethical questions resulting from new concepts and discoveries. 

281. Directed Study. (4) Readings on an interdisciplinary topic approved by the Civ 
mittee on Honors; presentation of a major research or interpretive paper baseon 
these readings, under the direction of a faculty member; an oral examination!! 
the topic, administered by the faculty supervisor and the Committee on Hons. 
Eligible students who wish to take this course must submit a written requesto 
the Committee on Honors by the end of the junior year. Not open to candid ;s 
for departmental honors. 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Marcellus E. Wad dill, Chairman 
Professors John V. Baxley, Richard D. Carmichael, Ivey C. Gentry, 
Frederic T. Howard, James Kuzmanovich, J. Gaylord May, W. Graham M< 
John W. Sawyer, Ben M. Seelbinder, Marcellus E. Waddill 

Visiting Professor S. Wilfred Hahn 

Associate Professors Elmer K. Hayashi, Ellen E. Kirkman 

Assistant Professors David J. John, Stan J. Thomas 

Instructor Deborah L. Harrell 

A major in mathematics requires forty credits. A student must include com* 
111, 112, 113, 121, 221, one of the courses 311, 317, 352, 357, and at least two aci 
tional 300-level courses. A prospective teacher in the education block may take ; 1 
in lieu of the course from 311, 317, 352, or 357. Lower division students are urjd 
to consult a member of the departmental faculty before enrolling in courses ot* 
than those satisfying Division II requirements. 

A minor in computer science requires four courses in computer science numbed 
higher than 171 and two courses in mathematics other than 105. 

A minor in mathematics requires Mathematics 111, 112, either 121 or 113, and the 
other courses numbered higher than Mathematics 108, two of which muste 
numbered above 200. 



*One or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors. 



109 

irrrinimum GPA of 2.0 in courses which comprise a major or minor in the depart- 
i- 1 is required for graduation with any major or minor which the department 

lis. 

regularly scheduled activity in mathematics is an informal seminar of students 
| faculty on topics not discussed in regular courses (for example, finite differences, 
I e theory, Monte Carlo method, divergent series). 

ie Departments of Mathematics and Computer Science and Economics offer 

nt major leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. 
| n interdisciplinary program affords the student an opportunity to apply 
iHematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, and quan- 
I ve analysis. The major consists of the following course requirements: 
hiematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 152, 201, 202, 215, 218; and three 
: tional courses chosen with the approval of the program advisers. Recommended 
: ses are Mathematics 253, 348, 353, 357, 358, and Economics 212, 242, 251, 281, 
:.; 288. Students electing the joint major must receive permission from both the 

artment of Economics and the Department of Mathematics and Computer 
; rice. 

-ghly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
i-ionors program in mathematics or in the joint major. To be graduated with the 
•mation "Honors in Mathematics," or "Honors in Mathematical Economics," they 
i' t complete satisfactorily a senior research paper and pass a comprehensive oral 
c, ritten examination. For additional information members of the departmental 
'lty should be consulted. 

Computer Science* 

Introduction to FORTRAN Programming. (2) Lecture and laboratory. A study 
3RTRAN language; students use computer terminals as well as card input. 
/Fail only. 

H Introduction to Computer Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A first 
se in structured programming, problem solving, and coding in a high level pro- 
iming language. 

COBOL Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study of the elements 
OBOL language. P— Computer Science 171 or 173. 

Computer Organization and Assembly Language Programming. (4) Lecture 
laboratory. A study of the ways information is stored and handled in a com- 

i r; an introduction to machine and assembly language. P— Computer Science 

! ind Mathematics 117. 

Selected Topics. (2, 3, or 4) Topics in computer science which are not studied 
gular courses or which further examine topics begun in regular courses. Con- 
varies. Not to be counted toward the minor in computer science. 

Data Structures. (4) Lecture and laboratory. Data representation and manipula- 
Includes the data types of list, string, tree, set, graph. P— Computer Science 
md Mathematics 117. 



er courses in which computing is used or taught extensively are Mathematics 355, Physics 130, 
^hysics 330. 



V 



110 






373. Algorithm Design. (4) Lecture and laboratory. Elementary techniques ft 
designing and analyzing algorithms. Includes divide-and-conquer, greedy, dynam 
programming, backtrack, branch-and-bound. P— Computer Science 173 an 
Mathematics 117. 






374. Database Management Systems. (4) Lecture and laboratory. An introductic 
to large scale database management systems. Topics include data independenc 
database models, query languages, security, integrity, and concurrency. P— Comput 
Science 371. 

375. Operating Systems. (4) Lecture and laboratory. The study of algorithms f 
sequencing, controlling, scheduling, and allocating computer resources. Pa 
Computer Science 371. 

381. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A course of independent study directed by 
faculty adviser. By pre arrangement. Not to be counted toward the minor in cor 
puter science. 



Mathematics 

105. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry. (2, 3, or 4) A review of the esse 
tials of algebra and trigonometry. Admission by permission only (generally, a st 
dent must have taken fewer than three years of high school mathematics to be eligil 
for admission). Not to be counted toward the major in mathematics. 

108. Essential Calculus. (5 or 4) A one-semester course in differential and integ 
calculus with application to business and the social sciences. No student allow 
credit for both 108 and 111. A student who might take additional calculus shot 
not take Mathematics 108. Lab— two hours. 

109. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (5 or 4) Probability and distribution fui; 
tions, means and variances, and sampling distributions. Lab— two hours. 

Ill, 112. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I, II. (5 or 4, 5 or 4) Calculus of fui- 
tions of one variable; infinite series. Computer lab using BASIC. No student alio- 
ed creidt for both 108 and 111. 

113. Multivariable Calculus. (4) Vector and space curves. Differentiable functioi 
surfaces and max-min problems. Multiple integrals and Green's theorems 
Mathematics 112. 

117. Discrete Mathematics. (4) An introduction to various topics in discr 
mathematics applicable to computer science including sets, relations, Boole 
algebra, propositional logic, functions, computability proof techniques, graph thee 
and elementary combinatorics. 

121. Linear Algebra. (4) Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations a 
matrices, linear groups, and determinants. 

221. Modern Algebra I. (4) An introduction to modern abstract algebra throu 
the study of groups, rings, integral domain, and fields. P— Mathematics 121. 






Ill 



I . Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models of Eucli- 
jin geometry. 

. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Linear equations with constant coeffi- 
nts, linear equations with variable coefficients, and existence and uniqueness 
I'orems for first order equations. P— Mathematics 112. 

\ Operations Research. (4) Mathematical models and optimization techniques. 
hdies in allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling, and network analysis. P— 
thematics 111. 

1 312. Advanced Calculus I, II. (4, 4) Limits and continuity in metric spaces, 
erentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences and series, uniform con- 
gence, power series and Fourier series, partial differentiation and functions of 
eal variables, implicit and inverse function theorems. P— Mathematics 113. 

. Complex Analysis I. (4) Analytic functions, Cauchy's theorem and its conse- 
?nces, power series, and residue calculus. P— Mathematics 113. 

:. Modern Algebra II. (4) A continuation of modern abstract algebra through 
study of additional properties of groups and fields and a thorough treatment 
vector spaces. P— Mathematics 221. 

> 324. Matrix Theory I, II. (4, 4) Basic concepts and theorems concerning matrices 
[1 real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. P— Mathematics 121. 

II. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models 
Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

V 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. (4, 4) Properties of integers, con- 
fences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic squares, 
Plications to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, arithmetic theory of 

ttinued fractions. 

I. Combinatorial Analysis. (4) Enumeration techniques, including generating 
ctions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya's 
1 orem. 

. Applied Analysis. (4) Topics which have proved useful in the physical sciences, 
luding vector analysis and complex analysis. 

.. Partial Differential Equations. (4) The separation of variables techniques for 
* solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations, with 

related study of the Fourier transform and the expansion of functions in Fourier, 
k;endre, and Bessel series. 

f . Numerical Analysis. (4) Development and application of probabilistic and deter- 
J listic models. Emphasis given to constructing models which represent systems 
:he social, behavioral, and management sciences. P— Mathematics 253. 

. Numerical Analysis. (4) A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in 
thematics. Lecture and laboratory. P— Mathematics 112 and Computer Science 
or 173. 



V 



: 



112 

357, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. (4, 4) Probability distributions, mathematical 
expectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of hypotheses, re- 
gression, correlation, and analysis of variance. C— Mathematics 113, or P— Permission 
of instructor. 

361. Selected Topics. (2, 3, or 4) Topics in mathematics which are not considered 
in regular courses or which continue study begun in regular courses. Content varies. 

381. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A course of independent study directed by a 
faculty adviser. By prearrangement. 

Military Science 

Lieutenant Colonel Matthew P. Murray Jr., Professor 

Major Peter J. Adolf, Major Daniel F. Smith, 

Captain Max E. Brewer, Captain Richard H. Crocker, 

Captain Scott A. Fernald, Capiain Gregg L. Hill, 

Captain Henry C. Newell, Assistant Professors 

Sergeant Major Ezequiel B. Evaro, Master Sergeant Arlanza L. Cook, 

Sergeant First Class Calvin Barnes, Staff Sergeant Albert E. Folds 

Completion of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps requirements results in the 
conferring of a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. The 
basic courses (100-level) are designed to provide the fundamentals of military history, 
Army organization and operation, leadership, and managerial assessment methods. 
No military obligation is incurred by enrollment in the basic courses. They are 
primarily for freshmen and sophomores; others must seek permission of the in- 
structor. The advanced courses (211, 212, 251, 252) provide study in professional 
knowledge subjects and development of the managerial skills required foi 
commissioning. 

110. ROTC and the National Defense. (1) Introduction to the Reserve Officers' Train 
ing Corps program, the United States Army, and the basic professional knowledge 
subjects. 

111. Military History. (2) Survey of the ideas and activities of the American people 
which contributed to the development of the Armed Forces; relationship betweer 
war and society. 

112. Operations in Special Environments. (2) Planning and preparation for militar) 
operations in mountain, desert, jungle, and arctic environments; fundamentals ol 
survival; mountaineering techniques. 

113. Tactical Considerations of Modern Battle. (2) Organization and operations o 
the United States Army. A non-classical comparison with the Army of the Sovie 
Union. Modern battle doctrine and equipment capabilities of both armies an 
analyzed in both conventional and special tactical environments. 

114. Leadership. (2) An examination of the fundamentals contributing to the develo 
ment of a personal style of leadership with emphasis on the dimensions of junioi 
executive management. 



113 

,15. Physical Readiness. (1) Designed to help students meet the physical readiness 
andards required by military service. Includes first aid and basic individual drill. 

L6. Orienteering. (2) A study of navigational aids, linear time/distance relation- 
lips, and mapping techniques. Includes navigating in unfamiliar terrain. 

'17, 118. Leadership Laboratory. (1, 1) Develops basic military skills of command, 
rill, and ceremonies. Prepares the student to command a military formation. 
[jss/Fail only. 

U, 212. First Year Advanced. (2, 2) Accelerated leadership training; professional 
nowledge subjects; preparation for ROTC Advanced Summer Camp; advanced 
istruction on the Soviet Army. Lab— one and one-half hours per week. P— Credit 
ir one of the following: 

(1) 110, 114, 115, and an optional two credit course (Physical Education 111 
may be substituted for 115; History 369 may be substituted for the optional 
course), or 

(2) Attendance at ROTC Basic Summer Camp, at Fort Knox, Kentucky (no 
academic credit). 

>1, 252. Second Year Advanced. (2, 2) Professionalism and ethics; active duty orien- 
tion; military administration, law, training, management, and logistics; written 

■[id oral communications; leadership. Lab— one and one-half hours per week. P— 

Military Science 211 and 212. 

H 

Music 

Susan Harden Borwick, Chairwoman 

Associate Professor Susan Harden Borwick 

Assistant Professors Stewart Carter, Christopher Giles, Louis Goldstein, 

David B. Levy, Dan Locklair, John V. Mochnick 

Director of Instrumental Ensembles George Trautwein 

Assistant Director of Instrumental Ensembles Martin Province 

Instructors Lucille S. Harris, Teresa Radomski 

"A major in music requires forty-eight credits. This includes a basic curriculum 
= thirty-six credits (Music Theory 171, 172, 173, and 174, sixteen credits; Music History 
1, 182, six credits; ten credits of applied music, and four credits of ensemble, taken 
- four semesters) plus twelve additional credits of elective courses in music. In 
Edition to the course work, music majors are required to present a senior recital, 
:ture-recital, or project. 

Students anticipating a major in music are urged to begin their studies during 
e freshman year and are required to audition during the second semester of their 
' phomore year before officially being admitted to the program. 
Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors pro- 
am in music. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Music," a can- 
late must complete one of the following requirements: (1) an honors-level research 
per, (2) an original composition, or (3) an analytical lecture related to music per- 
"med by the candidate in public recital. 









114 

A minor in music requires twenty-four credits: Music 171, 172; 181, 182; two credits 
of ensemble, taken in two semesters; two semesters of applied music (performance 
level in applied music must be equal to the level expected of majors at the time 
of the spring sophomore audition); six credits of music electives (excluding 
ensemble). Each minor will be assigned an adviser in the music department and 
is encouraged to begin private lessons as early as possible. 

Any student interested in majoring or minoring in music should consult the chair- 
woman of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

Music Theory 

101. Introduction to the Language of Music. (3, 4) Basic theoretical concepts and 
musical terminology. Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from 
the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. Satisfies the Division I require- 
ment. For students not majoring in music. 

102. Language of Music I. (3, 4) Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected 
works from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students who can 
read music. Not open to music majors. Satisfies the Division I requirement. P— 
Permission of instructor. 

104. Basic Music Reading and Skills. (2) A study of the fundamentals of music 
theory including key signatures, scales, intervals, and chords, and basic sight-singing 
and ear training skills. Designed for students wishing to participate in University 
ensembles and those wishing to pursue vocal, instrumental, and compositional 
instruction. 

105. Music Theory for Non-Majors. (4) A study and application of music fundamen- 
tals and music theory for the non-music major; analytical and compositional 
techniques. P— 104 or permission of instructor. 

171. Music Theory I. (4) Music fundamentals: key signatures, scales, modes, in- 
tervals, triads, elements of music. Ear training, sight-singing, and rhythm skills. 
(A one-hour piano class is required of students having no keyboard background.) 

172. Music Theory II. (4) Seventh chords, beginning part-writing, basic counter- 
point, ear training, sight-singing, rhythm skills keyboard harmony. P— Music 171. 

173. Music Theory HI. (4) Altered chords, continuation of part-writing, eighteenth 
and nineteenth century forms, ear training, sight-singing, rhythm skills, keyboard 
harmony. P— Music 172. 

174. Music Theory IV. (4) Expanded harmonic system of Impressionism and the 
twentieth century. New concepts of style and form. Ear training, sight-singing, 
rhythm skills, keyboard harmony. P— Music 173. 

202. Language of Music. (3, 4) An in-depth study of selected major works from 
the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. Not open to music majors. P— 
Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

270. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of sixteenth century contrapuntal 
music, in particular that of Palestrina. Examination of Renaissance writings on 
counterpoint. Composition of canon and motet. Offered in alternate years. P— Music 174. 



115 

i 271. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of eighteenth century contrapun- 
i tal styles, with concentration on the Well-Tempered Clavier and fugue. Offered in alter- 
i, nate years. P— Music 174. 

1 272. Analysis Seminar. (2) A study of anlaytical writings of theorists and composers 
3 and the development of practical skills as they can be used in research and perfor- 
mance preparation. Offered in alternate years. P— Music 174. 

273. Composition. (1 or 2) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composi- 
tion. May be repeated for credit. P— Permission of instructor. 

275. History of Theory. (2) A study of theoretical writing on musical acoustics, in- 
struments, and notation from classical Greece to the present. Offered in alternate years. 
. P-Music 174. 

a 276. Current Practices. (2) A survey of twentieth century compositional techniques, 
notation, and performance problems involving the study of music and theoretical 
writings associated with major trends from 1900 to the present. Offered in alternate 
years. P— Music 174. 



Music History 



3 124. Chamber Music. (2) Study of the history and repertoire of chamber music from 
■ the late Baroque to the twentieth century. Classroom work combined with actual 
rehearsal and performance of chamber repertoire. May be repeated for credit. P— 
i Audition and permission of instructor. 

•181. Music History I. (3) History of music from the Greeks to 1750. Satisfies the 
Division I requirement. P— Permission of instructor. 

1 182. Music History II. (3) History of music from 1750 to the present. Satisfies the 
Division I requirement. P— Music 181. 

201. Music History for Non-Majors. (3, 4) An historical survey of stylistic trends, 
l l major composers, and genera. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

a. Middle Ages d. Classical 

f b. Renaissance e. Romantic 

1 c. Baroque f. Contemporary 

203. History of Jazz. (4) A survey of American jazz from its origin to the present. 
Open to majors and non-majors. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

204. Survey of Choral Music. (4) A historical overview of important genera (i.e., 
anthem, cantata, motet, mass, oratorio) with an emphasis on church music and 
liturgical function. Open to majors and non-majors. P— Music 101 or 102 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

205. Survey of Orchestral Music. (4) A historical overview of important orchestral 
repertoire (i.e., symphony, concerto, overture, symphonic poem). Open to majors 
and non-majors. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 



V 



116 






206. Survey of Opera. (4) A study of the development of opera from 1600 to th< 
present. Selected operas by European and American composers will be examine< 
in class via record, score, and film. Class will attend opera performances when possi 
ble. Open to majors and non-majors. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructoi 

207. Music in America. (4) A study of the music and musical trends in Americ 
from 1650 to the present. The course will survey sacred and secular music fron 
the Pilgrims to the current trends of American composers. P— Music 101 or 102 o 
permission of instructor. 

212. Music in the Church. (4) Function of church musicians and the relationship 
of their work to the church program. P— Permission of instructor. 

215. Philosophy of Music. (2) A survey of philosophical writings about music 
Musical aesthetics; social, religious, and political concerns. P— Music 174, 182. 

219. Seminar in Medieval Music. (3) A study of medieval music, its philosophy 
theory (including notational practices), and performance practices. Areas receiv 
ing special emphasis are Gregorian chant repertoire, the Notre Dame School, A? 
Antiqua, and Ars Nova. P— Music 174, 182, or permission of instructor. 

220. Seminar in Renaissance Music. (3) A study of music from 1400 to 1600, it 
theory (including notational practices), and performance practices. The study begin 
with the Burgundian School, with special areas of emphasis being the Netherland 
composers and the late Renaissance madrigal. P— Music 174, 182, or permission c 
instructor. 

221. Seminar in Baroque Music. (3) Musical activity from about 1600 to Bach an 
Handel. Special emphasis on the development of national styles and their resolu 
tions toward the end of the era. P— Music 174, 182, or permission of instructor. 

222. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Music. (3) Musical developments from th 
sons of Bach through the Viennese Classicism of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethover 
P— Music 174, 182, or permission of instructor. 

223. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Music. (3) Music from the latter part c 
Beethoven's career through Wagner and Brahms. Special emphasis on the post 
Beethoven schism and its ramifications. P— Music 174, 182, or permission of instructo 

224. Seminar in Twentieth Century Music. (3) A study of the major musical style.' 
techniques, and media of contemporary music from Debussy to the present. P- 
Music 174, 182, or permission of instructor. 

Music Education 

186. String Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all instrument 
of the string family. Offered in alternate years. 

187. Woodwind Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all prir 
cipal instruments of the woodwind family. Offered in alternate years. 

188. Brass and Percussion Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teachin 
brass and percussion. Offered in alternate years. 



117 

JO. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how 
omposers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical 
coring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P— Music 174, 182. 

J2. Conducting. (4) A study of conducting techniques practical experience with 
isembles. P— Music 174 or permission of instructor. 

T J4. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an ex- 
"nination of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P— 
ermission of instructor. 

)9. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental training 
■chniques. Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, choral 
tid instrumental problems. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

)1. Teaching of Music. (4) The teaching and supervision of choral and instrumen- 
:d music in the public schools, all grades. P— Music 174, 182. 

| 

Honors and Individual Study 

)8. Individual Study. (2 or 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available 
"i the department. By pre-arrangement. 

W. Honors in Music. (4) Individual study for honors candidates who have fulfilled 
\e specific requirements. 

Ensemble 

) Departmental ensembles are open to all students. Credit is earned on the basis 
;f one credit per semester of participation in each ensemble. 

11. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and contem- 
■ orary operatic works. P— Permission of instructor. 

12. Collegium Musicum. An ensemble stressing the performance practices and 
iie performance of music of the medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Open 
;i> vocalists and instrumentalists. 

'13. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from the classical and 
yOntemporary repertoire. P— Audition. 

14. Madrigal Singers. A vocal chamber ensemble which specializes in the per- 
trmance of secular repertoire. P— Audition. 

15. Concert Choir. A select touring choir of forty-five voices which performs a 
ariety of choral literature from all periods. P— Audition. 

-. 16. Choral Union. A large oratorio chorus which concentrates on the performance 
f major choral works. P— Audition. 

• 17. Marching Deacons Band. Performs for most football games. Meets twice week- 
'. No audition required. Fall. 

18. Concert Band. Study and performance of music for wind band. P— Permission 
" instructor. Spring. 



118 

119. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for wind enst 
ble. Regular performances on and off campus, including an annual to 
P— Audition. 






120. Chamber Ensemble. (1) Study and performance of music composed specific./ 
for small ensemble. Performers are strongly urged to participate in a larger ense- 
ble as well. P— Permission of instructor. 



a. percussion c. string 

b. wind/brass d. mixed 



! 



121. Jazz Ensemble. Study and performance of written and improvised jazz r 
a twenty member ensemble. P— Audition. 

123. Piano Ensemble. Study of the elements of accompanying and ensemble pi - 
ing through class discussion and studio experience. P— Permission of instruct. 

Applied Music 

Applied music courses are open to all students with the permission of the • 
structor. Credit is earned on the basis of lesson duration and weekly preparatii. 
One credit per semester implies a half -hour of instruction weekly and a minim i 
of one hour of daily practice. Two credits per semester imply an hour of instr- 
tion weekly and a minimum of two hours daily practice. With the permissiorf 
the music faculty and with a proportional increase in practice, a student may e,t 
three or four credits per semester. Students in applied music who do not have b<: 
knowledge of notation and rhythm are advised to enroll in Music 101 or 104 eitlf 
prior to or in conjunction with applied study. An applied music fee is charged r 
all individual instruction. (See page 32 of this bulletin for specific informati 
regarding the fee.) 

161, 261. Individual Instruction. (1 or 2) May be repeated for credit. Technical stucs 
and repertoire of progressive difficulty selected to meet the needs and abilities f 
the student. 



a. 


violin 


f 


oboe 


k. 


French horn 


P- 


piano 


b. 


viola 


8- 


clarinet 


1. 


trombone 


<?• 


percussion 


c. 


cello 


h. 


bassoon 


m. 


baritone 


r. 


guitar 


d. 


bass 


i. 


saxophone 


n. 


tuba 


v. 


voice 


e. 


flute 


h 


trumpet 


0. 


organ 







165p. Class Piano. (1) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, wi 
emphasis on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed r 
the beginning piano student. 

165r. Class Guitar I. (1) Introduction to guitar techniques: strumming, plucki/ 
arpeggios, and damping. Reading and playing from musical notation and guir 
tablature. For beginning students. 

166r. Class Guitar II. (1) Continuation of guitar techniques. Emphasis on chor'l 
progressions, scales, accompanying patterns, and sight-reading. P— Music 165 



119 

v. Class Voice I. (1) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing, con- 
ts of breath control, tone, and resonance. 

w. Class Recorder. (1) Introduction to recorder techniques: breath control, ar- 
P lation, F and C fingering systems. Emphasis on ensemble playing. Designed 
beginning and intermediate recorder players. This course is intended to prepare 
dents for Music 112, but is not a prerequisite. 

v. Class Voice II. (1) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P— Music 
v or permission of instuctor. 

-j. Theatrical Singing I: Class Voice. (1) Basic techniques of singing, breath con- 
, phonation, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. Study and 
formance of musical theatre repertoire. (One hour per week.) 

■<v. Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice. (1) Continuation of theatrical singing techni- 
s with increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. P— Music 
v or permission of instructor. (One hour per week.) 

. Diction for Singers. (2) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on 
tdification of English; pronunciation of Italian, German, and French. Develop- 
Bnt of articulatory and aural skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet, 
dividual performance and coaching in class. (Two hours per week.) 




f< 



120 

Philosophy 

Gregory D. Pritchard, Chairman 

Worrell Professor Robert M. Helm 

Professors Marcus B. Hester, Gregory D. Pritchard 

Associate Professors Charles M. Lewis, Ralph C. Kennedy III 

Instructor Win-chiat Lee 

A major in philosophy requires thirty-six credits. The courses must include 261 
and either 161 or 271, two courses from the history sequence (201, 211, 222), and 
one course from each of the following: 230, 231, 241, 242, or 258; 262, 275, 279, 282, 
285, or 287. In addition to these courses, a major in philosophy requires a "major 
paper," consisting of twenty-five or more type-written pages, to be submitted for 
a course, chosen by the student, from among courses in philosophy taken during 
his or her last three semesters. This paper may also satisfy the term paper require- 
ment for the course. 

A minor in philosophy requires five courses, one of which will be either Philosophy 
111, 171, or 172. These courses are to be chosen in accordance with one of the follow- 
ing plans. Although plans A, B, and C are designed to complement majors in the 
specified areas, any one of the plans may be chosen by someone who wants to pur- 
sue other interests. 

( A ) Art, Literature, and Religion (B) Natural Science 

Philosophy of Art and/or Philoso- Philosophy of Science; Logic 

phy of Religion; one or more and/or Symbolic Logic; one or 

concentration courses (230, 231, more of the following: 201, 211, 

241, 242, 258); one or more of the 222, 225, 230, 231, 233, 241, 258 

following: 201, 211, 222, 225, 261, 275, 280. 
275. 

(C) Social Science, Politics, and Law (D) Open Plan 

Ethics and/or Philosophy of Law; With departmental approval, a 

Logic and/or Symbolic Logic; one fourth option will be available to 

or more of the following: 201, 211, students for whom none of the 

225, 230, 231, 241, 242, 258, 262, specified plans would be appro 

275, 279, 287. priate. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced students in philosophy, was 
established in 1934 through an endowment provided by Bernard W. Spilman. The 
income from the endowment is used for the seminar library, which now contains 
about 4,000 volumes. Additional support for the library and other departmental ac- 
tivities is provided by the A. C. Reid Philosophy Fund, which was established in 
1960 by friends of the department. The furniture in the library and seminar room 
was donated in honor of Claude V. Roebuck and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hough by 
their families. 

Two distinguished alumni of the College have made possible the establishment 
of a lectureship and a seminar. The late Guy T. Carswell endowed the Guy T and 









121 

Clara Carswell Philosophy Lectureship, and a gift from James Montgomery Hester 
established the Hester Philosophy Seminar. In addition, a lectureship bearing his 
name has been instituted in honor of Claude V. Roebuck. 

Superior majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the honors 
program in philosophy. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Philosophy," a qualified student must submit an acceptable prospectus for an honors 
thesis by November for graduation in the spring semester or by May for gradua- 
tion in the fall semester, present a satisfactory paper based on the prospectus, (as 
1 judged by the student's honors adviser and at least one other member of the depart- 
*ment), and show an acceptable level of performance in a discussion of the paper 
[with the honors adviser and at least one other member of the department. In lieu 
tof a prospectus, the student's "major paper" may be submitted, provided that this 
:i occurs in the semester before the semester in which he or she is to graduate and 
^provided that the paper is re-written in view of criticism and additional research 
materials as appropriate for an honors paper. 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts of 
^several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of 
knowledge, man, God, mind, and matter. 

r 
161. Logic. (4) An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition of 

fallacies, and logical analysis. 

1X71, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religious 

and philosophical ideas in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Either 

(Philosophy 171 or 172 satisfies the philosophy or religion requirement; both 171 and 

< 172 satisfy both the philosophy and religion requirements; choice determined at 

registration. 

175. Space and Time in Fact and Fiction. (4) Are space and time fundamentally 
different? Are they properties of the physical world or of minds only? Are they finite 
or infinite in extension and duration? Other questions cover problems and paradoxes 
in the concept of space and in the concept of time travel. P— Philosophy 111, 171, 
or 172. 

182. Medical Ethics. (4) A study of moral problems in medicine including 
informed consent, experimentation on human subjects, truth-telling, confidentiality, 
abortion, euthanasia, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. P— Philosophy 
111, 171, or 172. 

- 201. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. (4) A study of philosophical problems such 
as the nature of faith, reason, universals, and God in the thought of Plato, Aristotle, 
Augustine, Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, and Ockham. P— Philosophy HI, 171, or 172. 

211. Modern Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Descartes to 
Nietzsche. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

222. Contemporary Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Russell 
to Sartre. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

225. American Philosophy. (4) A study exploring the philosophies of Jonathan 
Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, C. S. Pierce, William James, John Dewey, and 



V 



122 

others, examining their views on logic, experience, science, reality, nature, art, educa 
tion, and God. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

230. Plato. (4) A detailed analysis of selected dialogues, covering Plato's most im 
portant contributions to ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowledge 
metaphysics, and theology. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

231. Aristotle. (4) A study of the major texts, with emphasis on metaphysics, ethics 
and theory of knowledge. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

241. Kant. (4) A detailed study of selected works covering Kant's most importan 
contributions to theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and religion. P- 
Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

242. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. (4) An examination of selected source: 
embodying the basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, especially a: 
they relate to each other in terms of influence, development, and opposition. P- 
Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

258. Wittgenstein. (4) The work of Ludwig Wittgenstein on several centra 
philosophical problems is studied and compared with that of Frege, James, an< 
Russell. Topics include the picture theory of meaning, truth, scepticism, privat 
languages, thinking, feeling, the mystical, and the ethical. P— Philosophy 111, 171 
or 172. 



■ 



261. Ethics. (4) A critical study of selected problems and representative works ii 
ethical theory. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

262. Social and Political Philosophy. (4) A systematic examination of selected sod; 
and political philosophers of different traditions, with concentration on Plato, Man 
Rawls, and Nozick. Topics include rights, justice, equality, private property, the state 
the common good, and the relation of individuals to society. P— Philosophy 11" 
171, or 172. 






271. Symbolic Logic. (4) Basic concepts and techniques of modern deductive logic 
beginning with the logic of truth-functions and quantifiers, and including som 
discussion of topics as Church's thesis and theorem, the completeness of first-orck 
logic, and Godel's incompleteness theorems. 

275. Philosophy of Mind. (4) A selection from the following topics: the mind-bod 
problem; personal identity; the unity of consciousness; minds and machines; th 
nature of experience; action, intention, and the will. Readings from classical an 
contemporary sources. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

279. Philosophy of Science. (4) A systematic exploration of the conceptual found; 
tions of scientific thought and procedure. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

280. Philosophy and Physics. (4) A study of philosophical problems raised by quai 
turn physics. The problems include basic changes in our conceptual scheme in logi 
explanation, metaphysical concepts of things, and speculative cosmology. (The coun 
requires no prerequisite in either philosophy or physics. 

282. Philosophy of Law. (4) A philosophical inquiry into the nature of law and i 
relation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classic 






123 

id modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions 
legal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and punish- 
ent. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

;5. Philosophy of Art. (4) A critical examination of several philosophies of art, 
tth emphasis upon the application of these theories to particular works of art. 
.-Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

7. Philosophy of Religion. (4) A systematic analysis of the logical structure of 
.ligious language and belief, including an examination of religious experience, 
ysticism, revelation, and arguments for the nature and existence of God. P— 
\ilosophy HI, 171, or 172. 

4. Seminar in Epistemological Problems. (4) P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

k'5. Seminar in Metaphysical Problems. (4) P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

6. Independent Study. (2-4). 



Physical Education 

William L. Hottinger, Chairman 

Professors William L. Hottinger, Paul M. Ribisl 

Associate Professor Walter Rejeski 

Assistant Professors Dorothy Casey, Leo Ellison, Stephen Messier 

Visiting Assistant Professor Sarah D. Hutslar 

Instructors Susan E. Balinsky, Donald Bergey, Gary Hall, Rebecca Myers 



The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to organize, administer, 
id supervise (1) a professional education program which prepares students interested 
the field of physical education; (2) a required /elective physical education program con- 
sting of conditioning activities, dance, and individual and team sports; and (3) 

'< intramural sports program which provides a wide variety of competitive activities. 

i 

Physical Education Requirement 

All entering students are required to complete two semesters of physical educa- 
)n: Physical Education 111, Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness, and one ad- 
tional course selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The re- 
tirement must be completed before elective courses are taken. It is recommended 
1 at the requirement be completed by the end of the student's first year; it must 
! completed by the end of the second year. 



Courses in Basic Instruction and Elective Physical Education 

1. Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness 

2. Sports Proficiency 

3. Adaptive Physical Education 

4. Weight Control 



:: 



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124 

115. Physical Conditioning 

116. Weight Training 

119. Aerobic Dancing 

120. Beginning Dance Technique 

121. Intermediate Dance Technique (P— Physical Education 120 or permission of 
instructor) 

122. Advanced Dance Technique (P— Physical Education 121 or permission of instructo 

123. Dance Composition (P— Physical Education 121) 

124. Social Dance 

125. Folk and Social Dance 

126. Jazz Dance 

130. Beginning Tumbling/ Free Exercise 

131. Intermediate Tumbling/Free Exercise 

132. Beginning Gymnastic Apparatus 

133. Intermediate Gymnastic Apparatus 

134. Aero-Sports 

140. Beginning Swimming 

141. Intermediate/Advanced Swimming 

143. Water Ballet /Synchronized Swimming 

144. Springboard Diving 

145. Advanced Lifesaving and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (P— Strong swimming 
ability) 

146. Water Safety Instructor's Course (P— Current advance lifesaving certification) 

150. Beginning Tennis 

151. Intermediate Tennis 

152. Advanced Tennis (P— Physical Education 151 or permission of instructor) 

154. Beginning/Intermediate Badminton 

155. Beginning Squash Racquets 

156. Beginning Racquetball 
V57. Intermediate Racquetball 

160. Beginning Golf 

161. Intermediate Golf 

162. Archery 

163. Bowling 

164. Beginning/ Intermediate Handball 

165. Recreational Games 

170. Volleyball 

171. Soccer 

175. Wrestling 

176. Fencing 

179. Beginning Horseback Riding 

180. Intermediate/Advanced Horseback Riding 

181. Srcou? Skiing 

182. Beginning Ice Figure Skating 

183. Intermediate/Advanced Ice Figure Skating 

190. Karate 

191. Yoga 



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Courses for the Major and Minor 

Students desiring to elect a major in physical education must be of junior stand- 
g. Biology 111 is required. Three tracks are available to majors in physical educa- 
>n; they are general physical education, teacher certification, and exercise science. 
11 tracks require the following core of courses in physical education: 111, 212, 230, 
>0, 352, 353, 360, three beginning 100-level courses, and two intermediate/ad- 
mced 100-level courses. 

Students in the general track must take the following courses in physical educa- 
m: 222, 224, 251, plus at least two courses from the following: 220, 226, 240, 310, 
3, and 370. Students in the teacher certification track must take the following 
urses in physical education: 125, 222, 224, 226, 240, 251, and 363. Students in the 
ercise science track must take Physical Education 215 and 370 plus a ten-hour 
ience sequence in biology (beyond 111), chemistry, mathematics, or physics. The 
ience sequence will be determined in consultation with the major adviser. Physical 
iucation 382 is recommended, but not required. 

Students desiring a minor must take the following courses in physical education: 
1, 212, 230, 250, 352, 353, three beginning 100-level courses, and either 226 or two 
termediate/advanced 100-level courses. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
e honors program in physical education. Upon successfully meeting specifically 
itlined requirements, they are recommended for graduation with "Honors in 
rysical Education." Consult an adviser in the physical education department for 
i outlin of the requirement. 

Any student interested in majoring in physical education should consult the chair- 
an of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

1. Outdoor Exploration. (2) Introduction to various outdoor recreational and sur- 
val skills. 

5. Basic Skin and Scuba Diving and Open Water Certification. (2) A course in 
in and SCUBA diving that offers international certification by the Professional 
ssociation of Diving Instructors (PADI). 

8. Current Topics in Sports Psychology. (2) A survey of the field with an em- 
iasis on current topics. Students may not receive credit for both 208 and 212. 

2. The Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. (4) An examination of the social- 
ychological foundations of sport and exercise related phenomena. Attention is 
yen to performance as well as mental health issues in these domains. The topics 
scussed include coach-athlete interactions, youth sport, the profile of elite per- 
rmers, women in sport, and compliance to exercise programs. 

5. Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Science. (4) A laboratory course designed 
acquaint the student with standard techniques of measurement in exercise science 
2., anthropometry, body composition, energy metabolism, work ergometry, etc.) 
the study of the physiologic response to exercise. P— Physical Education 353. 

0. Methods and Materials in Aquatics. (2) Presentation of knowledge, skill, and 
^thods of teaching aquatics. 



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126 






222. Sports Activities I. (2) A development of theory and skill in selected spor 
(volleyball, softball, soccer). 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develoj 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher ar 
an understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for tl 
grade level. 

224. Sports Activities II. (2) A development of theory and skill in selected spor 
(tennis, gymnastics, wrestling, or badminton). P— Physical Education 130 or 13 

226. Sports Activities and Methods of Teaching. (3) A development of theory ar 
skill in selected sports and methods of class administration (baseball, track and fiel 
methods of teaching). 

230. First Aid and Athletic Training. (2) A study of first aid techniques and 
care and treatment of athletic injuries. 

240. Physical Education for Pre-School and Elementary School. (3) A study of I 
development stages of fundamental motor skills and a presentation of methods 
teaching physical education activities to the pre-school and elementary school chil 

250. Principles of Physical Education and Motor Learning. (3) A study of the pri 
ciples and foundations of the field of physical education, with emphasis on lear 
ing theories important to psychomotor development. 

251. Organization and Administration. (3) A study of organization and administr 
tion of physical education and athletic programs. 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application of theory and methoi 
of solving problems in a specialized area according to the student's immediate care 
goals. P— Physical Education 250 or permission of instructor. 

352. Human Anatomy and Kinesiology. (5) A study of the principles of hum; 
motion based on the functional knowledge of the anatomical structure of the hum; 
body Laboratory devoted to dissection and study of the human muscular and skele 
systems. 

353. Physiology of Exercise. (4) The course presents the many effects of muscul 
activity on the processes of the body which constitute the scientific basis of physic 
education. 

360. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. (3) A cour 
in measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures to determine puj 
status in established standards of health and physical education which reflect t 
prevailing educational philosophy. 

363. Health and Adapted Physical Education. (3) A study of personal and coi 
munity health needs of school age children and methods of administering physic 
education programs for special students. 

370. Biomechanics of Human Motion. (5) Study of the internal and external ford 
which act upon the human body and the effects produced by these forces. Laboratc 
devoted to the biomechanical analysis of sport techniques. P— Physical Educatii 
352 or permission of instructor. 



127 



. Individual Study in Health and Physical Education. (1-4) Library conferences 
[ laboratory research performed on an individual basis. 

Physics 

George P. Williams Jr., Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Brehme, William C. Kerr, Howard W. Shields, 

George P. Williams Jr. 

Associate Professor George Eric Matthews 

Assistant Professor Natalie A. W. Holzwarth 

Lecturer George M. Holzwarth 

the program for each student majoring in physics is developed through consulta- 
i with the student's major adviser and may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or 
achelor of Science degree. The BA degree requires a minimum of basic physics 
irses and allows a wide selection of electives related to the student's interests 
rother disciplines. The BS degree is designed to prepare students for careers in 
■rsics, perhaps beginning with graduate study. 

nhe Bachelor of Arts degree in physics requires thirty-seven credits in physics 
|1 must include courses 161, 162, 345, and two from 230, 352, and 351. The Bachelor 
Science degree in physics requires forty-five credits in physics and must include 
rses 311, 312, 343, 344, 345, and 346. In special cases the department may allow 
solutions. For either degree, two courses in chemistry or the equivalent and 
thematics 251 are required. 
. typical schedule for the first two years: 

r 

Freshman Sophomore 

asic and divisional requirements Basic and divisional requirements 

yhysics 111, 112 or 121, 122 (five courses) 

Mathematics 111, 112 Physics 161, 162 

Dfeign Language Mathematics 251 

} this sequence is followed, the physics major may be completed in such a way 
wo allow considerable flexibility in exercising various options, such as the five 

r BA/MS program. (For information about this program, consult the department 

irman.) This saves time, and the outstanding student may qualify for a tuition 

olarship in the senior year of the five year program, 
student may minor in physics via one of the following options: 

Option A: Twenty-four credits including Physics 111, 112 (or 121, 122), 161, and 
162. 
' Option B: "Scientific Computer Systems Design" — Twenty-three credits con- 
sisting of Physics 111, 112, (or 121, 122), 130, 164, 230, and 330. 

tudents interested in the minor should so advise the instructor of the second 
'■ r course. 

Physics 111, 112 or 121, 122 is not taken in the freshman year, one of the se- 
! nces may be taken in the sophomore year; the degree requirements in physics 

J still be completed by the end of the senior year. No student may be a can- 



V 



128 

didate for a degree with a major in physics with a grade less than C in general physics 
without special permission of the department. 

Satisfactory completion of the laboratory work is required for a passing grade 
all courses with a laboratory. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission tc 
the honors program in physics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors ir 
Physics," students must complete satisfactorily Physics 381 and pass a comprehen 
sive written examination. For additional information on these programs or on the 
engineering program the chairman of the departmental faculty should be consulted 

101. Conceptual Physics. (5) A non-mathematical introduction to the essential prin- 
ciples of classical and modern physics based on a conceptual treatment of the more 
exciting contemporary aspects of the subject. Credit not allowed for both 101 anc 
111. Lab— two hours. 



" 






104. Introductory Physics for Teachers. (3 or 4) No lab. Does not satisfy Divisior 
II requirements. 

105. Descriptive Astronomy. (4) An introductory study of the universe, from the 
solar system to the galaxies. No lab. Does not satisfy Division II requirements. 

106. Physics and the Sounds of Music. (3 or 4) A study of the production, pro 
pagation, and perception of musical sounds. Satisfies no divisional requirements 
No prerequisites; no lab. 

108. Energy and the Environment. (2) A descriptive, non-mathematical introduc 
tion to the concept of energy and its role in the environment. Does not satisfy Divi 
sion II requirements. 

Ill, 112. Introductory Physics. (5, 5) Essentials of mechanics, wave motion, heat 
sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics for freshmen art( 
sophomores. Lab— two hours. 

121, 122. General Physics. (5, 5) A course designed for those who expect to majo 
in physics or chemistry. A calculus treatment of topics covered in 111, 112. A stu 
dent may not receive credit for both this course and Physics 111, 112. Lab— two hours 
C— Mathematics 111. 

130. Introduction to Microcomputers. (4) Microcomputer architecture and interfacin; 
with an introduction to programming in BASIC, assembler, and machine language 

141. Elementary Modern Physics. (4) The development of twentieth century physic 
and an introduction to quantum ideas. P— Physics 112 or 121 and Mathematics 111 

161. Applied Mechanics. (5) The fundamental principles of mechanics. Lab— thre 
hours. Offered in the spring of even-numbered years. P— Physics 111 or 121 an' 
Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 

162. Introductory Electricity. (4) The fundamental principles of electricity 
magnetism, and electromagnetic radiation. P— Physics 112, Mathematics 112. 

164. Introductory Electricity Lab. (1) A three hour laboratory. 

230. Electronics. (4) Introduction to the theory and application of transistors ar 



129 



;:tronic circuits. Lab— three hours. Offered in the fall of odd-numbered years. P— Physics 
or equivalent. 

I 302. Physics Seminar. (0, 0) Discussion of contemporary research, usually with 

ting scientists. Attendance required of junior and senior physics majors. 
r 
.. Mechanics. (4) A junior/senior level treatment of analytic classical mechanics. 

Mathematics 251. 

i . Electromagnetic Theory. (4) A junior/senior level treatment of classical elec- 
fnagnetic theory. P— Physics 162 and Mathematics 251. 

j). Data Acquisition and Analysis. (4) Advanced treatment of computer interfac- 
,, signal processing methods, non-ideal integrated circuit behavior, and data reduc- 
,j\ and fitting procedures. P— Physics 130, 230. 

, 332. Acoustics I, II. (4) A study of the fundamental principles and applica- 
\\s of the generation, transmission, and reception of sound and its interaction 
h various media. 

, 344. Modern Physics. (4, 4) Application of the elementary principles of quan- 
i mechanics to atomic and molecular physics. 

r, 346. Modern Physical Laboratory. (1, 1) The laboratory associated with Physics 
,, 344. Lab— three hours. 

. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (4, 4) Introduction to classical and 
istical thermodynamics and distribution functions. Offered in the spring of odd- 
nbered years. 

. Physical Optics and Spectra. (5) A study of physical optics and the quantum 
3 itment of spectra. Lab— three hours. Offered in the fall of even-numbered years. 

=, 382. Research. (2-4, 2-4) Library, conference, and laboratory work performed 
an individual basis. 

f Politics 

i . Richard D. Sears, Chairman 

Professors Jack D. Fleer, Carl C. Moses, *Jon M. Reinhardt, 

C. H. Richards Jr., Donald O. Schoonmaker 

Professor of History and Asian Studies Balkrishna Govind Gokhale 

Associate Professors David B. Broyles, Richard D. Sears 

distant Professors Mark A. Cichock, Saguiv A. Hadari, Kathleen B. Smith 

Visiting Assistant Professor Robert L. Utley 

i its broadest conception, the aim of the study of politics is to understand the 
f / in which policy for a society is formulated and executed and to understand 
moral standards by which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest 
ften described alternatively as the study of power, of government, of the state, 
)f human relations in their political context. For teaching purposes, the study 
•olitics has been divided by the department into the following fields: (1) American 



'd, May 24, 1984 



u 



130 

politics, (2) comparative politics, (3) political philosophy, and (4) international politics. 
Introductory courses in the first three of these fields provide broad and flexible ap- 
proaches to studying political life. 

The major in politics consists of thirty-six credits. The courses must include the: 
following: (a) a first course selected from Politics 113, 114, or 115; (b) any non-seminar 
course in each of the four fields of the discipline except Politics 217, 242, 244, 252, 
253, 256, 275, 284, 285, 287, and 288; (c) one seminar in politics (usually a studen; 
takes no more than one seminar in each field and no more than three seminars 
overall). A minimum grade average of C on all courses attempted in politics is re- 
quired for graduation. Majors should consult with their advisers concerning addi- 
tional regulations. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission tc 
the honors program in politics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Politics," one must successfully complete Politics 284 and 285. Politics 284 and 285 
must be taken as additional courses beyond the thrity-six credits ordinarily required. 
For additional information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted 

The minor in politics consists of twenty credits, ordinarily including Politics 115 
but excluding Individual Study and seminar courses. Sixteen of the credits musl 
be taken at Wake Forest and any transfer courses must be approved by the chair 
man. None of the courses may be taken pass/fail. 

A student who selects politics to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take 
one of the following courses: Politics 113, 114, or 115. No introductory level course 
is required for students taking a politics course as an elective unless such a prere 
quisite is specified in the course description. 



Introductory Courses 



A student may take any one of the following as a first course in the departmeni 
more than one may be taken. Ordinarily a student is expected to take Politics 11 
as the first course. 

113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics. (4) The nature of politics, politica 
principles, and political institutions, with emphasis on their application to the Unitei 
States. 

114. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics. (4) Political processes and prin 
ciples as applied to traditional, developing, and mature states. 

115. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory. (4) Major systematic statements c 
the rules and principles of political life. Representative writers are Tocqueville, Dahl 
and Aristotle. 

American Politics 

210. Major Topics in Public Policy. (2, 3, or 4) A study of major policies on th 
current public agenda in the United States, including consideration of alternativ 
policy responses and the politics surrounding them. Possible topics include th 
politics of poverty and welfare, medical care, education, crime, and energy. Cred 
varies with the number of topics studied. 



: 



131 



. Political Parties and Voting Behavior. (4) An examination of party competi- 
n, party organizations, the electorate and electoral activities of parties, and the 
ponsibilities of parties for governing. 

I. Public Administration. (4) Introduction to the study of public administration 
phasizing policy-making in government agencies. 

'. Politics and the Mass Media. (4) Exploration of the relationship between the 
litical system and the mass media. Two broad concerns will be the regulation 
the mass media and the impact of media on political processes and events. 

. Congress and Policy-Making. (4) An examination of the composition, authority 
ictures, external influences, and procedures of Congress with emphasis on their 
[plications for policy-making in the United States. 

I. The American Presidency. (4) Emphasis on the office and the role; conrribu- 

is by contemporary presidents considered in perspective, 
i 
. Contemporary Issues in American Constitutional Law. (4) A study of the in- 

oretations of selected, contemporary constitutional issues by the United States 

.preme Court. Among questions investigated are certain aspects of presidential 

ver, freedom of expression, church and state relations, the concept of equality, 

right to privacy, and capital punishment. Credit may not be granted for both 

vitics 221 and/or 225, 226. 

- . Urban Problems and Politics. (4) Political structures and processes in American 
.es and suburbs as they relate to the social, economic, and political problems of 
metropolis. 

Politics, Law, and Courts. (4) Analysis of the nature and role of law in American 
iety and the structure and procedure of American courts. Questions of judicial 
, anization, personnel, and decision-making, as well as the impact of law and court 
isions on the social order, are explored at local, state, and national levels. 

Comparative Politics 

!i. Western European Politics. (4) Analysis of the political systems of Great Bri- 
i, France, and Italy, focusing primarily on the problems of stable democracy. 

h. Government and Politics in the Soviet Union. (4) Analysis of the institutions 
i 1 processes of politics in the USSR and examination of political developments 
Uther states of Eastern Europe. 

! I . The Politics of West and East Germany. (4) A study of the political behavior 
i i governmental institutions of the capitalist democratic regime of West Germany 
i i the authoritarian socialist regime of East Germany. 

! . Government and Politics in East Asia. (4) An analysis of the political institu- 
• is and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problem of 
ft iernization. 

■ The Politics of Revolution. (4) A study of revolution as an alternative means 
| ocio-political change. Analysis of the nature and types of revolution as well as 



// 



132 

causes, processes, and consequences. Attention is given to some historical ce?s 
and to some current revolutionary situations and movements. 

236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (4) Comparative analysis of ie 
institutions and processes of politics in the Latin American region. 

237. Comparative Public Policy in Selected Industrialized Democracies. (4) An.v 
vestigation of the public policy choices involving such matters as health, edia- 
tion, and income maintenance plans in selected Western European countries, te 
origins, development, trends of the "welfare state" will be examined in Great i- 
tain, West Germany, and Sweden. 

238. History, Culture, and Political Change. (4) The study of how major culties 
articulate or symbolize their existence either in history or moving through hist y. 
Special attention given to an evaluation of current concepts applied to polital 
change. 

242. Problems in Comparative Policies. (4) An intensive study of one or more a- 

jor problems in contemporary comparative politics. 

I 

244. Politics and Literature. (2, 3, or 4) An examination of how literature cansc- 

tend our knowledge of politics and political systems. The course considers then- 
sights of selected novelists, such as Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Heinrich Boll, Ro Tt 
Penn Warren, George Orwell, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the government ot 
India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon. Emphasis on political organizations, party stic- 
tures, and subnational governmental systems. 



International Politics 

251. Fundamentals of International Politics. (4) Fundamental theoretical quest ns 
of international politics, with special emphasis on existing international patteis 

252. Current Problems in International Politics. (4) An intensive study of on or 
more major problems of contemporary international politics. 

253. The Politics of International Economic Relations. (4) A study of the emerguce 
of international economic transactions, including trade, monetary affairs, irvst- 
ment, and multinational corporations, as a central aspect of world politics. 

254. American Foreign Policy: Contemporary Problems. (4) A critical exarruncOn 
of different methods of studying American foreign policy and of selected polies 
followed by the United States since the early 1960s. 

255. American Foreign Policy: The Cold War Period. (4) A critical examinatic of 
the forces which shape American foreign policy and of selected policies folloed 
from World War II to the Cuban Missile Crisis. 

256. Nuclear Weapons and National Security. (2 or 4) An analysis of the strati- 
political, and moral implications of nuclear weapons as instruments of natiial 
policy. Both American and Soviet perspectives will be considered and specuat- 



133 



ntion will be given to contemporary debates over the possession and control of 
uclear weapons. 



Political Philosophy 

1. Plato, Aristotle, and Classical Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the 
ature and goals of the classical position, with attention to its origins in ancient 
thens and its diffusion through Rome. Representative writers are Plato, Aristotle, 
id Cicero. 

7. Equality and Liberty. (4) The arguments for and against democracy and 
ipublicanism, majority rule, and the rights of man. Representative writers are 
ousseau and Mill. 

^3. Radical Critiques of Political Society. (4) Anarchist, socialist, and communist 
iticisms of and alternatives to existing political societies, with special attention 
> such problems as utopianism and alienation. Representative writers are Marx 
id Nietzsche. 

I 7 4. Noble Greeks and Romans. (4) A study of statesmanship in the speeches and 
[:tions of selected major figures. Theory manifested in practice. Representative 
Titers are Shakespeare and Plutarch. 

J5. Theory of the American Polity. (4) Critical examination of the nature of the 
s merican polity as expressed by its founders and leading statesmen. Representative 

riters are the Federalists, Lincoln, and Wilson. Does not meet theory distribution 

jquirement for majors. 

7 6. Medieval Political Philosophy. (4) Philosophy and religion in cooperation and 
inflict. Emphasis on Christian writers with some attention to Muslim and Jewish, 
epresentative writers are Aquinas, Dante, and Maimonides. 

J& Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the essential 
'ritings of thinkers who broke with the past in an attempt to establish a more 
realistic" approach to the study of politics. Representative writers are Machiavelli, 
iobbes, and Locke. 



Honors and Individual Study 

14. Honors Study. (2) Directed study and research in preparation for a major paper 
i a subject of special interest to the student. Taken in the fall semester of the senior 
;ar by all candidates for departmental honors. 

!5. Honors Study. (3) Directed study toward completion of the project begun in 
)litics 284 and to the writing and defense of an honors paper. Taken in the spring 
mester of the senior year by all candidates for departmental honors. P— Politics 284. 

'7. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) Internships, work/study projects, and other in- 
vidual study programs. 



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134 



Seminars 



291. Seminar in American Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent stuc 
on selected topics. P— Permission of instructor. 

292. Seminar in Comparative Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independe 
study on selected topics. P— Permission of instructor. 

293. Seminar in International Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independe 
study on selected topics. P— Permission of instructor. 

294. Seminar in Political Philosophy. (4) Readings, research, and independent stuc 
on selected topics. P— Permission of instructor. 

Psychology 

John E. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Robert H. Dufort, Charles L. Richman, 

John E. Williams 

Associate Professors Deborah L. Best, David W. Catron, 

Philippe R. Falkenberg, David Allen Hills, Cecilia H. Solano 

Assistant Professors Jerry M. Burger, Maxine L. Clark 

Adjunct Associate Professor Frank B. Wood 

Adjunct Assistant Professor C. Drew Edwards 

Visiting Assistant Professor Nur Gryskiewicz 

Lecturer Brian M. Austin 

Adjunct Instructors Susan R. Leonard, Marianne A. Schubert 

Psychology 151 is prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. Courses number I 
below 151 do not count toward Division rv requirements or toward the major i 
psychology. Psychology 211, or special permission of the instructor, is prerequis i 
for all 300-level courses except 313, 335, 344, 358, and 367. 

It is recommended that students who are considering psychology as a major ta» 
Psychology 151 in their freshman year and Psychology 211 in the fall of thr 
sophomore year. An average of C or higher in psychology courses is required t 
the time the major is elected. The major in psychology requires the completion f 
a minimum of forty credits in psychology, including 151, 211, 212, and 313. In ad>- 
tion, the major student must complete one course from each of the following group 
320, 326, 329, and 333; 341, 351, 355, and 362. No more than forty-eight psycholof 
credits may be counted toward the graduation requirements. 

The minor in psychology requires twenty credits in psychology, distributed I 
follows: 151 (four credits); 211 (five credits); at least one of the following coursit 
320, 326, 329, 333 (four credits each); and seven additional credits in counl 
numbered 200 or above. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the hon<» 
program in psychology. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 1 
Psychology," the student must complete satisfactorily a special sequence of couns 
(381, 383) and pass an oral or written examination. In addition, the honors studt.t 



135 



normally has a non-credit research apprenticeship with a faculty member. For more 
detailed information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

jj 

100. Learning to Learn. (2, 3, or 4) A workshop to help people improve their learn- 
ing skills through the application of basic principles of learning, remembering, and 

c so forth. Students at all levels welcomed. No prerequisite. Pass/Fail only. 

102. Exploration of Career Planning. (2, 3, or 4) Examination of educational/ voca- 
1 tional planning as a personal process, based on knowledge of self and the work 
world. No prerequisite. 

" 151. Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the scien- 
tific study of behavior. Prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. 

211, 212. Research Methods in Psychology. (5, 5) Introduction to the design and 
statistical analysis of psychological research. Lab— twice weekly. P— Psychology 151. 

239. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of con- 
sciousness with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and 
drugs. P— Psychology 151. 

241. Developmental Psychology. (4) Survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, and 
| social development in humans from conception to death. P— Psychology 151. 

245. Survey of Abnormal Behavior. (4) Study of problem behaviors such as depres- 
sion, alcoholism, antisocial personality, the schizophrenias, and pathogenic per- 
sonality patterns, with emphasis on causes, prevention, and the relationships of 
these disorders to normal lifestyles. P— Psychology 151. 




] 






136 



250. Psychology Abroad. (4) The study of psychology in foreign countries. Cn 
tent and travel plans vary from year to year depending upon interests of fac t\ 
and students. Usually offered in summer. P— Psychology 151. 

255. Theories of Personality. (4) A comparative study of classical and contempo n 
theories of human personality. P— Psychology 151. 

260. Social Psychology. (4) A survey of the field, including theories of social beha Dr 
interpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and group behavior. '- 
Psychology 151. 

265. Human Sexuality. (4) An exploration of the psychological and physiolo^a 
aspects of human sexuality, with attention to sexual mores, sexual deviances, a 
ual dysfunction, and sex-related roles. P— Psychology 151. 

268. Psychology of Business and Industry. (4) Psychological principles and met!" d< 
applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. P— Psycho g\ 
151. 

270. Topics in Psychology. (1, 2, or 3) The student selects from among a grou oi 
short one-credit courses dealing with topics of special interest. The courses r*ei 
sequentially, not concurrently, and options are offered in each portion of the semter 
P— Psychology 151. 

Psychology and Politics 
Sex Stereotypes and Roles 
The Gifted and Creative Perso) 
Liking and Loving Relationshij 
Animal Flying Behavior 



270A 


Aggression 


270K 


270D 


Brain/Behavior Relations 


270L 


270E 


Emotion 


270M 


270H 


Intelligence 


270N 


2701 


Race and Young Children 


270P 


270J 


Memory 





280. Directed Study. (1-4) Student research performed under faculty supervise 
P— Psychology 151 and approval of faculty member prior to registration. 

313. History and Systems of Psychology. (4) The development of psycholopal 
thought and research from ancient Greece to present trends, with emphasis ©in- 
tensive examination of original sources. P— Psychology 151. 

320. Physiological Psychology. (4) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical expl ra- 
tions of behavior. P— Psychology 211 or permission of instructor. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on anial 
behavior. This course may count as biology or psychology but not both; choi< to 
be determined at registration. P— Permission of instructor. 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (4) Survey of concepts and research in lerr- 
ing, with particular emphasis on recent developments. P— Psychology 211. 

329. Perception. (4) Survey of theory and research findings on various senary 
systems (vision, hearing, touch, taste). P— Psychology 211. 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (4) Survey of basic motivational concepts and re):ed 
evidence. P— Psychology 211. 



H 7 

) 335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of some 
hi fundamental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems; 
includes reward and punishment, conflict anxiety, affection, needs for achievement 
U and power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P— Psychology 151. 

341. Research in Child Development. (4) Methodological issues and selected 
: research in child development. Research projects required. P— Psychology 211. 

i 342. Current Issues in Development Psychology. (4) Intensive examination of 
selected theoretical or research issues in this area. P— Psychology 211 and 341. 

<j 343. Developmental Disorders. (2) Delayed or distorted neural development studied 
I] in relation to major disturbances of learning and behavior in children and in the 
aging. P— Psychology 211. 

a 344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnor- 
ffl mal behavior with attention to organic, psychological, and cultural causes and ma- 
jor modes of therapy. Offered in the summer. 

U 351. Personality Research. (4) The application of a variety of research procedures 
: to the study of human personality. Research projects required. P— Psychology 211. 

f 355. Research in Social Psychology. (4) Methodological issues and selected research 
in the study of the human as a social animal. Research projects required. P— 
Psychology 211. 

357. Cross-Cultural Psychology. (4) An examination of differences in psychological 
p processes (e.g., attitudes, perception, mental health, organizational behavior) 
] associated with cultural variation. P— Psychology 151. 

358. Psychology of Woman. (4) Intensive study of the behavior of women and its 
personal application, including consideration of biological, social, and motivational 

j factors. P— Psychology 151. 

361. Operant Conditioning and Behavior Modification. (4) Principles, theory, and 
h experimental research in operant learning, with applications to the modification 
f of behavior in various populations and situations. P— Psychology 211. 

i 362. Psychological Tests and Measurements. (4) Theory and application of 
psychological assessment procedures in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, voca- 
: tional interest, and personality. P— Psychology 211. 

363. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (4) An overview of the field of clinical 

psychology. P— Psychology 245 and senior standing or permission of instuctor. 
ii 
367. Effectiveness in Parent/Child Relations. (4) A survey of popular approaches 

to child-rearing, with examination of the research literature on parent/child interaction 

1 and actual training in parental skills. P— Psychology 151. 

369. Contemporary Applications of Psychology. (4) Supervised field experience in 
applied psychology. P— Psychology 151 and permission of instructor. 

378. Instrumentation for Psychological Research. (2-4) Lecture/demonstration 
presentation of electrical and mechanical equipment, followed by practical applica- 



V 



138 

tion in small group project work. Assumes no prior knowledge of electricity or co 
struction. P— Permission of instructor. 



i' . 



381. Honors Seminar. (3) Seminar on selected problems in psychology. Intendi 
primarily for students in the departmental honors program. P— Psychology 211 ar 1 
permission of instructor. M 

383. Honors Research. (3) Seminar in selected issues in research design, follow, 
by independent empirical research under the supervision of a member of the depa 
mental faculty. P— Psychology 211 and permission of instructor. 

392. Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (4) Seminar treatment of current thee 
and research in several "frontier" areas of psychology. Principally for senior majc 
planning to attend graduate school. P— Psychology 211 and senior standing. . 

Religion 

Carlton T. Mitchell, Chairman 

Professors John William Angell, George McLeod Bryan, Emmett Willard Hamric 

E. Glenn Hinson, Carlton T. Mitchell, Charles H. Talbert 

Associate Professors John E. Collins, Fred L. Horton Jr., Ralph C. Wood Jr 

Adjunct Associate Professor Thomas E. Dougherty Jr. 

Instructor John D. Sykes Jr. 

The department offers courses designed to give every student an opportunity 
acquire at least an introduction to the life, literature, and most important movemen 
in the field of religion. It also seeks to give students preparing for specialized sjl 
vice as religious education directors, ministers, and missionaries the foundation 
courses needed for further study. 

A course in religion is required for all degrees. Any 100 level course offered 
the department is accepted to meet the Division III requirement. 

A major in religion requires a minimum of thirty-two credits, at least half of whi» 
must be in courses above the 100 level. 

A minor in religion requires twenty credits, eight of which must be above t; 
100 level. The required courses may include one pass/fail course if the course* 
offered on the pass/fail basis only. The department will provide advisers for studeiJ 
electing the minor in religion. 

Pre-ministerial students are advised to include in their program of study, i 
addition to courses in religion, courses in psychology, ancient history, public spe.- 
ing, and two languages (Greek or Latin and German or French). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission) 
the honors program in religion. To be graduated with the designation "Honors i 
Religion," they must apply to the chairman of the department for admission to (2 
honors program, normally by February of the junior year. Upon completion of 1 
the requirements the candidate is graduated with "Honors in Religion." For ad- 
tional information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) A survey of the Old Testarnd 



139 

lesigned to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient 
lebrews. 

12. Introduction to the New Testament. (4) A survey of the literature of the New 
estament in the context of early Christian history. 

20. Introduction to the Bible. (4) A consideration of prominent themes found in 
ne Old and New Testaments. 

31. Basic Christian Ethics. (4) The Biblical and theological foundation of the 
Ihristian ethic and its expression in selected contemporary problems. 

61. World Religions. (4) The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and 
ccomplishments of the living religions of the world, studied from the historical 
oint of view. 

54. History of Christianity to the Reformation. (4) A survey of the history of the 
ihristian Church from its origins to the Reformation. 

55. History of Christianity in Modern Times. (4) A survey of the history of the 
Christian Church from the Reformation to the present. 

56. American Religious Life. (4) A study of the history, organization, worship and 
eliefs of American religious bodies, with particular attention to cultural factors. 

71, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religion 
rid philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Either Religion 
71 or 172 satisfies the philosophy or religion requirement; both 171 and 172 satisfy 
oth the philosophy and religion requirements; choice determined at registration. 

177. Faith and Imagination. (4) A study of modern writers, including C. S. Lewis 
rid J. R. R. Tolkien, who seek to retell the Christian story in imaginative terms. 

)2. Religious Ecstasy. (4) Phenomenological study of religious ecstasy and of the 
lethods by which it is obtained. Views of selected psychologists, sociologists, an- 
iropologists, theologians, and historians of religion are considered. 

11. The Hebrew Prophets. (4) A study of the background, personal characteristics, 
jmction, message, contribution, and present significance of the Hebrew prophets. 

12. The Wisdom Literature. (2) An introduction to the Wisdom Literature of the 
!<l>ld Testament, with special attention to Proverbs. 

14. Introduction to Biblical Archeology. (4) A survey of the contributions of Near 
astern archeology to Biblical studies. 

15. Visions of the End: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic. (4) Reading and study 
i : Biblical and non-Biblical apocalyptic texts. 

17. Old Testament Apocrypha. (4) Reading of the books of the Apocrypha, with 
fecial attention to their origin and significance, and with a consideration of the 
nbivalence of Judaism and Christianity toward this literature. 

18. Seminar in the Mediterranean World. (4) Travel and study in such countries 
i Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, and Israel. 



// 



140 






236. Church and Community. (4) An examination of the basic needs and trends 
of the contemporary community, especially the rural and suburban, in the light 
of the Christian norms for "the good community." 

237. Black Religion and Black Churches in America. (4) Survey of literature on 
these themes with an examination of the historical background and special atten- 
tion to the contemporary area. 

238. Religion and Science. (4) An analysis of the relationship between science and 
religion in world culture. 

240. Principles of Religious Education. (4) A study of the theory and practice of 
religious education, with emphasis on the basic foundations in religion and 
education. 

261. Judaism in the First Three Centuries of the Common Era. (4) A study of the 
development of Rabbinic Judaism out of the sects and movements of first century 
Judaism. 

266. Religious Sects and Cults. (4) An examination of certain religious sects in 
America, including such groups as Jehovah's Witnesses, communal groups, and 
contemporary movements. 

270. Theology and Modern Literature. (4) An introduction to such modern 
theologians as Karl Barth and Reinhold Niebuhr, and to literary figures who share 
their concerns, including Flannery O'Connor and Walker Percy. 

273. Studies in Ecumenical Theology. (4) A study of various images and models 
of the church, their interrelationships and implication for ecumenism. 

274. An Introduction to Christian Theology. (4) A study of the ground, structure, 
and content of Christian belief. 

276. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. (4) A comparative analysis of 
the source and remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Dante, and 
Shakespeare. 

277. Christian Literary Classics. (4) A study of Christian texts which are master- 
pieces of literature as well as faith, including works by Augustine, Dante, Pascal, 
Bunyan, Milton, and Newman. 

282. Honors in Religion. (4) A conference course including directed reading and 
the writing of a research project. 

286, 287. Directed Reading. (1-4, 1-4) A project in an area of study not otherwise 
available in the department, permitted upon departmental approval of a petition 
presented by a qualified student. 

292. Teaching Religion. (4) A study of the teaching of religion in church, school, 
and community. 

300. Meaning of Religion. (4) A phenomenological study of different ways of defin- 
ing religion, including the views of representative philosophers, psychologists, 
sociologists, anthropologists, theologians, and historians of religion. 



141 



101. Myth. (4) A study of the approaches to the interpretation of myth, with a focus 
i>n the meaning and values implicit in the myths of contemporary culture. 

112. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. (4) A study of Hebrew poetry its types, 
i ts literary and rhetorical characteristics, and its significance in the faith of ancient 
israel. 

15, 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (4, 4) A study of the religion and 
) ulture of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an 
indent site. 

1 17. The Ancient Near East. (4) A comparative study of ancient Near Eastern cultures 
•find religions, with special emphasis on Israel's relationships with surrounding 
>eoples. 

,20. Jesus and the Synoptic Gospels. (4) A study of Jesus' proclamation and ac- 
•ivity in light of modern critical research on the Gospels. 

621. The Quest for the Historical Jesus. (4) An investigation of the possibility and 
ti elevance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a consideration of the seminal 
'Lives of Jesus" since the eighteenth century. 

22. The General Epistles. (4) An exegetical study of two or more of the general 
-ipistles, with emphasis on the setting of the epistles in the life of the Early Church. 

"26. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (4) An introduction to the Pauline inter- 
fetation of Christianity and its place in the life of the Early Church. 

27. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. (4) An examination of 
he Johannine interpretation of Jesus and the Christian faith. 

'28. The New Testament and Ethics. (4) A study of selected ethical issues in the 
Jew Testament within the context of Mediterranean culture. 

132. Religion and the Social Crisis. (4) An interdisciplinary approach to the study 
1 if society today, with particular attention to views of human nature and social in- 
titutions as reflected in religion, the social sciences, and related disciplines. 

-34. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. (4) A study of the encounter 
between the Christian ethic and the value systems implicit in the social areas such 
s economics, politics, race, and sex. 

(a) Bio-medical Decisions (b) Feminist Theology 

46. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. (4) A study of theological 
rtethodology, theories of learning, and philosophies of education in terms of their 
^plications for religious education. 

50. Psychology of Religion. (4) An examination of the psychological elements in 
he origin, development, and expression of religious experience. 

54. Religious Development of the Individual. (4) A study of growth and develop- 
ment through childhood and adolesence to adulthood, with emphasis on the role 
f the home and the church in religious educaiton. 

55. Theology of Pastoral Care and Couseling. (4) A study of the relationship 



V 



142 



between theology and the purpose, theories, and methods of pastoral care. P— 
Permission of instructor. 

360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu tradition. 

361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, 
and its impact on the culture of Asia. 

363. Hellenistic Religions. (4) Consideration of available source materials, ques- 
tions of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic religions as the 
mysteries, Hellenistic Judaism, and Gnosticism. 

364. Islam. (4) A study of the fundamental concepts of Islamic thought and the 
historical context of its development. Both ancient and contemporary impact of the 
teachings of Islam considered. 

365. History of Religions in America. (4) A study of American religions from 
colonial times until the present. 

367. The Mystics of the Church. (4) A historical study of the lives and thought of 
selected Christian mystics with special attention to their religious experience. 

368. The Church: Reformation and Counter-Reformation. (4) A study of the origin 
and development of Reformation theology and ecclesiology. 

373. History of Christian Thought. (4) A study of the history of Christian thought, 
beginning with its Hebraic and Greek backgrounds and tracing its rise and develop- 
ment to modern times. 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. (4) An examination of the major issues and 
personalities in modern theology. 

375. Major Themes in Catholic Theology. (4) A detailed examination of the central 
themes of Christian theology through the study of major Roman Catholic 
theologians. 

376. The Origins of Existentialism. (4) A study of the principal nineteenth century 
figures who form the background for twentieth century existentialism: Goethe, 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. 

378. Aesthetics and Religion. (2-3) An examination of aesthetic and religious theories 
of selected thinkers, noting what the arts and religion have in common as modes 
of perception and expression. 

Hebrew 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. (4, 4) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew 
of the Bible, with emphasis on the principles of Hebrew grammar and the reading 
of Biblical texts. Both semesters must be completed. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (4) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax 
based upon the readings of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-Biblical Hebrew. 
P— Hebrew 111, 112, or the equivalent. 

211. Hebrew Literature. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical Hebrew 
texts. P— Hebrew 153. 



143 



212. Hebrew Literature II. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical and 
post-Biblical texts. Offered on demand. P— Hebrew 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Languages. (4) A study of the history and structure 
of four languages from the Hamito-Semitic family. 



Romance Languages 

Kathleen M. Glenn, Chairwoman 

Professor of Humanities Germaine Bree 

Professors Shasta M. Bryant, Kathleen M. Glenn, John E. Parker Jr., 

Mary Frances Robinson, Anne S. Tillett 

Associate Professors Doranne Fenoaltea, Milorad R. Margitic, 

Gregorio C. Martin 

Assistant Professor Candelas M. Newton 

Visiting Assistant Professors Candide Carrasco, Susan Linker 

Lecturers Bianca Artom, Eva Marie Rodtwitt 

Instructors Ruben L. Gomez, Edward Miller, David A. Petreman, 

Anna-Vera Sullam (Venice), Sylvia Trelles, Barbara Welch, Byron R. Wells 

Visiting Instructors Joyce Loland, Jennifer Sault 

The major in French requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty-four 
of which must be in literature. French 219 and 221 or their equivalents are required; 
History 321 and 322 are recommended. An average of at least C must be earned 
in all courses taken in the major. 

The minor in French language and culture requires twenty credits in French above 
French 153. It includes French 219, 221, 224, or their equivalents. The minor in French 
literature requires twenty credits in French literature above French 153. 

The major in Spanish requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty 
of which are normally in the literature of Spain and Spanish America. Spanish 219, 
221, 223, 224, and eight credits chosen from 225, 226, and 227, or their equivalents, 
are required. Spanish 181, 1829, and 187 may not count toward the major. An average 
of at least C must be earned in all courses taken in the major. 

The minor in Spanish language and culture requires twenty credits in Spanish 
above Spanish 153. It includes 214 or 215 or 216, plus 219, 221, 223, and 224. The 
minor in Hispanic literature requires twenty credits in Spanish above Spanish 153. 
It includes 214 or 215 or 216, plus 225, 226, 227, and one additional advanced course 
in literature. For both Spanish minors, with departmental approval, equivalent 
courses may be selected from the programs in Salamanca or Bogota, and certain 
other substitutions may be made. 

A joint major is offered in French and Spanish, consisting of fifty-six credits in 
the two languages and literatures, excluding elementary language. Required courses 
for this major are French 153x, 216, 217, 219, 221, and 224; Spanish 153x, either 215, 
or 216, 219, 221, either 223 or 224, and eight credits from 225 through 227. Equivalents 
may be substituted. An average of at least C must be earned in all courses taken 
in the major. 



144 



All majors are strongly urged to take advantage of the department's study abroad 
programs and to live for at least a semester at Lovette House, a foreign language 
residence center for students of French, Italian, and Spanish. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
the honors program in French or Spanish. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Romance Languages," a candidate must complete French or Spanish 
280 and 281 and pass a comprehensive written and oral examination. The oral ex- 
amination may be conducted, at least in part, in the major language. For additional 
information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

101. Self-Instructional Language. (4) A self-instructional language course covering 
the principles of grammar and pronunciation in one of the less commonly taught 
languages, such as Japanese, Swedish, Arabic, or Thai. Individual self- instruction 
in the language of the student's choice through the use of recorded material and 
textbooks. Admission by petition to the Foreign Language Placement Review Com- 
mittee. Elective credit only; does not satisfy basic or divisional course requirements. 

French 

111, 112. Elementary French. (4, 4) A course for beginners, covering the principles 
of French grammar and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elemen- 
tary texts. Lab required. 

113. Intensive Elementary French. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements 
of grammar and skills presented in French 111, 112. Intended for students whose 
preparation for French 153 is inadequate. Not open to students who have received 
credit for French 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice 
in conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab required. P— French 112, 113, or two 
years of high school French and placement. 

153x. Intermediate French. (4) Open to students by placement or permission. Lab 
required. 

164. A Classic in Comedy. (2 or 4) Participants plan and present a production of 
a French comedy. The play is rehearsed and performed in French; students are in- 
volved in all aspects of production. For four credits, students also read and discuss 
other dramatic works. Course may be repeated for credit, but only four credits may 
be counted toward the major. P— Permission of instructor. 

181. Swiss French Civilization. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the Swiss people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with 
families. Visits are made to points of cultural, historical, literary, and artistic interest. 
A journal and a paper describing in detail some aspect of Swiss French civilization, 
both in French, are required. Usually offered in the summer. 

185. Paris, Cultural Center of France. (4) A study of Paris monuments on location 
to explore the development of the city as capital and cultural center of France. No 
prerequisites. Usually offered in the summer. 



145 



199. French Individual Study. (2-4) P— Permission of the department. 

- 213. Masterpieces of French Literature. I. (4) Reading of selected texts in French. 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Parallel 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major 
or minor, but either may satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P— French 153 
or equivalent. 

, 214. Masterpieces of French Literature II. (4) Reading of selected texts in French. 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Parallel 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major 

i or minor, but either may satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P— French 153 

: or equivalent. 

216. Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth 
' Century. (4) Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and 
i movements. P— French 153 or permission of instructor. 

! 217. Survey of French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (4) 

Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and movements. P— 
French 153 or permission of instructor. 

- 219. Composition and Review of Grammar. (4) A systematic review of the fundamen- 
r tal principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing idiomatic 

French. Required for major. P— French 153 or equivalent. 

3 221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing French, 
( stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
1 vocabulary for everyday situations. Required for major. P— French 153 or equivalent. 

224. French Civilization. (4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
development. Emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life 
1 of France. P— French 221 or permission of instructor. 

1 227. History of French Civilization. (2) An introduction to the historical develop- 
1 ment of French culture, including consideration of its intellectual, artistic, and 
political heritage. P— French 221 or permission of instructor. 

l ( 228. Contemporary France. (2) A study of present-day France, including aspects 
' of geography and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
life today. P— French 221 or permission of instructor. 

229. Business French. (4) A study of French used in business procedures, emphasiz- 
ing specialized vocabulary pertaining to business correspondence, corporate 
organization, banking, and governmental relations, with practice in translation and 
interpretations, oral and written. P— French 219 and 221 or permission of instructor. 

231. Medieval French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature of the Middle 
Ages with cultural and political backgrounds. Selected masterpieces in original form 
and modern transcription. P— French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

233. Sixteenth Century French Literature. (4) The literature and thought of the 
Renaissance in France, with particular emphasis on the works of Rabelais, 



146 

Montaigne, and the major poets of the age. P— French 216 or 217 or permission of 
instructor. 

241. Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of the outstanding writers 
of the Classical Age. P— French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

242. Seminar in Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of selected 
topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P— French 216 or 217 or 
permission of instructor. 

251. Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature of 
the eighteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P— French 216 or 
217 or permission of instructor. 

252. Seminar in Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) Study of selected topics 
of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P— French 216 or 217 or permission 
of instructor. 

261. Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of French literature of the 
nineteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P— French 216 or 217 
or permission of instructor. 

262. Seminar in Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected topics 
of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P— French 216 or 217 or permission 
of instructor. 

263. Trends in French Poetry. (4) A study of the development of the poetic genre 
with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P— French 216 or 217 I 
or permission of instructor. 

264. French Novel. (4) A broad survey of French prose fiction, with critical study I 
of several masterpieces in the field. P— French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. | 

265. French Drama. (4) A study of the chief trends in French dramatic art, with 
reading and discussion of representative plays. P— French 216 or 217 or permission | 
of instructor. 



271. Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) A study of general trends and 
representative works of the foremost prose writers, dramatists, and poets. P— French 
216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

272. Seminar in Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected topics 
of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P— French 216 or 217 or permission 
of instructor. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in French. 

281. Directed Study. (3, 4) Extensive reading and/or research to meet individual 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P— Permission of the department. 

371. Surrealism. (4) Origins, theories, evolution, and impact. This course examines 
the interconnections between Surrealist poetry and painting and the works of Breton, 
Eluard, and Aragon. P— French 221 or equivalent. 



:! 



147 

372. Proust. (4) Study of substantial portions of Proust's A la Recherche du temps perdu, 
its themes, and their significance in historical and aesthetic context. P— French 221 
3r equivalent. 

373. French Images of America. (4) A study of French points of view through the 
'reading of texts beginning with Tocqueville and ending with Michel Butor's Mobile. 

The course attempts to relate them to a variety of circumstances and influences, 
oolitical, sociological, and cultural. P— French 221 or equivalent. 



Semester in France 

The department sponsors a semester in France in Dijon, the site of a well- 
established French university. Students go as a group in the fall semester, accom- 
panied by a departmental faculty member. 

i No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student (1) should be 

-)f junior standing and (2) should have taken as prerequisite French 221 or its 

equivalent or at least one French course beyond the intermediate level. 

, Students are placed in language courses according to their level of ability in French, 

as ascertained by a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French pro- 

essors. The resident director supervises academic, residential, and extracurricular 

iffairs and has general oversight of independent study projects. 

1232. Advanced Oral and Written French. (2-4) Study of grammar, composition, 
jronunciation, and phonetics, with extensive practice in oral and written French. 

:!282. Contemporary France. (4) A study of present-day France, including aspects 
: )f geography and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
. ife today. 

i292. French Civilization. (2-4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
development. Field trips to museums and to points of historical and cultural 
ignificance in Paris and the French provinces. 

1402. Independent Study. (2-4) One of several fields; scholar's journal and research 
)aper. Supervision by the director of the semester in France and evaluation by the 
lepartment for which credit is granted. Work may be supplemented by lectures 
>n the subject given at the Universite de Dijon Faculte des Lettres et Sciences 
iumaines. 

752. French Literature. (2) Topics in the novel, theatre, and poetry of France, largely 
)f the period since 1850. 

762. Literary Pilgrimage. (2-4) Reading of selected French texts, with visits to sites 
laving literary associations. A study of the relationship between milieux and works, 
aught in French speaking countries. 

^rt 2712. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, 
culpture, and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth 
enturies. 



// 



148 



History 2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2) Burgundian society, culture, and 
government in the reigns of Philip the Bold, John the Fearless, Philip the Good, 
and Charles the Rash, 1384-1477. 



Spanish 

111, 112. Elementary Spanish. (4, 4) A course for beginners covering grammar essen- 
tials and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts. Lab 
required. 

113. Intensive Elementary Spanish. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements 
of grammar and skills presented in Spanish 111, 112. Intended for students whose 
preparation for Spanish 153 is inadequate or who have demonstrated proficiency 
in another language. Not open to students who have received credit for Spanish 

112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of grammar and composition with prac- 
tice in conversation. Reading of selected texts. P— Spanish 112 or 113 or two years 
of high school Spanish or equivalent. Lab required. 

153x. Intermediate Spanish. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

162. A Panorama of Drama. (2-4) A brief sampling of Spanish drama from its early 
period to the contemporary theatre, studying in Spanish representative works from 
each major period. Approximately six plays. The class selects one play to present 
in Spanish, with students having directing and acting responsibilities. 

181. Colombia: Study Tour of Bucaramanga, Cali, and Medellin. (4) Travel in 
Colombia and residence in one of its major cities in homes of private families for 
a period of three weeks. Students receive instruction in spoken Spanish and in 
Colombian literature and anthropology and political, social, or economic history. 
Does not count toward the major. Usually offered in the summer. 

187. Culture and Language. (4) A study of Spanish culture and language, tailored 
to various levels of student ability. Taught only in the Spanish-speaking world. Does 
not count toward the major. Usually offered in the summer. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P— Permission of the department. 

214. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish and 
Spanish American literature. Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 216. 
Offered in the summer. P— Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

215. Major Spanish Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P— Spanish 153 or 
equivalent. 

216. Major Spanish American Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P— Spanish 
153 or equivalent. 



149 

219. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (4) A systematic review of the fun- 
damental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
idiomatic Spanish. Lab required. P— Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing Spanish, 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
vocabulary of everyday situations. Lab required. P— Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

223. Latin American Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development; 
emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P— Spanish 
215 or 216. 

224. Spanish Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development; emphasis 
on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

225. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
' Century. (4) Extensive reading and study of trends and influences. P— Spanish 215 

or 216. 

226. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Present. (4) 

Extensive reading and study of trends and movements. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

227. Survey of Spanish American Literature. (4) Extensive reading and study of 
works from the colonial through the contemporary periods, with emphasis on the 
late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

229. Commercial, Official, and Social Correspondence. (4) Instruction in the special 
vocabularies, formats, and styles required in written and telegraphic communica- 
tions. Students write in Spanish communications appropriate to each type of cor- 
respondence. P— Spanish 219 and 221 or permission of instructor. 

234. Spanish Prose Fiction before Cervantes. (4) A study of several types of prose 
fiction, such as the sentimental, chivalric, pastoral, Moorish, and picaresque novels, 
prior to 1605. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

241. Golden Age Drama. (4) A study of the major dramatic works of Lope de Vega, 
, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and others. P— Spanish 
215 or 216. 

243. Cervantes. (4) Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with special 
attention on the Quixote and the novelas ejemplares. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

244. Seminar in Cervantes. (2-4) A study of special aspects of Cervantes' works, 
such as the novelas ejemplares and his dramatic works. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

252. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry. (2-4) A study of selected topics, such as gongorismo, 
the romancero, and the Generation of 1927. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

261. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. (4) A study of the novels of Valera, Pereda, 
Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ibanez, and their contemporaries. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

265. Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of the novel in Spanish America from 
its beginning through the contemporary period. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 



// 



150 

266. Seminar in Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of one or more categories 
of Spanish American novels, such as romantic, indianista, realistic, gauchesca, and 
social protest. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

269. Nineteenth Century Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic 
works from neoclassicism to the end of the century. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

271. Modern Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic works from the 
end of the nineteenth century through the contemporary period. P— Spanish 215 
or 216. 

273. Modern Spanish Novel. (4) A study of representative Spanish novels from the 
Generation of 1898 through the contemporary period. P— Spanish 215 or 216. 

274. Seminar in Modern Spanish Literature. (2 or 4) An analysis of selected con- 
temporary works representative of the novel, poetry, theatre, and essay. P— Spanish 
215 or 216. 

275. Special Topics. (2-4) Selected special topics in Spanish or Spanish American 
literature, such as the Spanish Romancero or the contemporary Spanish American 
novel. Offered at irregular intervals. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in Spanish. 

281. Directed Study. (3-4) Extensive reading and/or research, to meet individual 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P— Permission of the department. 



Semester in Spain 

The department offers a semester in Spain at Salamanca, the site of a well- 
established Spanish university. Students go as a group in the spring semester, ac- 
companied by a professor from the College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student (1) should be 
of junior standing, (2) should have completed intermediate Spanish or its equivalent, 
and (3) should be approved by both the major department and the Department 
of Romance Languages. A course in Spanish conversation is also recommended. 

1829. Introduction to Spain. (2-4) Familiarization with the Spanish people, Spanish 
culture, and daily life in Spain. Classes in conversational and idiomatic Spanish, 
excursions to points of historical and artistic interest, and lectures on selected topics. 

2049. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. (4) Theory and practical application of 
the elements involved in speaking correct Spanish. 

2059. History of the Spanish Language. (4) Evolution and historical development 
of the Spanish language, including regional dialects and present-day variations in 
the spoken and written form. 



151 



'.179. Intensive Spanish. (2) Intensive study and practice of the oral and written 
i anguage. 

1259. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
Century. (4) Extensive reading and study of trends and influences. 

£419. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. (4) A survey of the most important 
I mthors and genres of the Golden Age, with particular emphasis on the novel and 
I he drama. 

759, Contemporary Spanish Literature. (4) A study of general trends and represen- 
ative works of selected prose writers, dramatists, and poets from the modern period. 

Sociology 2029. Social-Political Structures of Present-Day Spain. (4) A study of 
he various social and political elements which affect the modern Spanish state. 

history 2019. General History of Spain. (4) History of Spain from the pre-Roman 
>eriod to the present day. 

i Art 2029. Spanish Art and Architecture. (4) A study of the development and 









V 



152 

uniqueness of Spanish art and architecture within the framework of Mediterranean 
and Western art in general. 

Chinese* 

111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system. Basic sentence 
patterns covered. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P— Permission of the department. 

Hindi* 

111, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention given mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
vocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and conver- 
sation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab required. P— Hindi 111, 112, or the 
equivalent. 

211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose and 
poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lab required. P— Hindi 153. 

Italian 

113. Intensive Elementary Italian. (5) Intensive course for beginners, emphasizing 
the structure of the language and oral practice. Recommended for students in the 
Venice program and for language majors. Lab requred. Lecture— five hours. Offered 
every semester. 

153. Intermediate Italian. (5) Continuation of 113, with emphasis on reading and 
speaking. Lab required. Lecture— five hours. P— Italian 113 or two years of high school 
Italian. 

153x. Intermediate Italian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P— Permission of instructor. 

215. Introduction to Italian Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in Italian. 
Satisfies basic requirement in foreign language. Offered in the spring. P— Italian 153 
or equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Italian Literature II. (4) May alternate with 215. Satisfies basic 
requirement in foreign language. P— Italian 153 or equivalent. 

Semester in Venice 

2213. Spoken Italian. (4) Course in oral Italian, offered only in Venice. Students 
are placed in small groups according to their levels of fluency. Elective credit. 



*These courses are attached to the Department of Romance Languages for administrative purposes only. 



153 
j 
I Japanese* 

11, 112. Elementary Japanese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
peaking skills. Brief introduction to the writing systems. Basic sentence patterns 
overed. Lab required. 

Norwegian* 

i 

JO, 191. Norwegian. (4, 4) Independent study of the language and directed reading 

f texts in Norwegian. Primarily for students specializing in foreign languages. 

Russian* 

11, 112. Elementary Russian. (4, 4) The essentials of Russian grammar, conversa- 
onal drill, and reading of elementary texts. Lab required. P— Permission of instructor. 

.153. Intermediate Russian. (5) Training in principles of translation with grammar 
?view and conversation practice. Lab required. P— Russian 112 or equivalent. 

53x. Intermediate Russian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

cl5. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from the nine- 
?enth century. P— Russian 153 or equivalent. 

16. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from the twen- 
eth century. P— Russian 153 or equivalent. 

) 17. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (4) A study of the foremost 
* /Titers, with reading of representative works. P— Russian 153 or equivalent. 

3 18. Seminar in Contemporary Russian Literature. (4) Reading of representative 
rorks in Russian with discussion of political and cultural backgrounds. P— Russian 
)53 or equivalent. 

Sociology 

Philip J. Perricone, Chairman 

Professor John R. Earle 

Associate Professors William H. Gulley, Philip J. Perricone 

Assistant Professors Catherine T. Harris, Willie Pearson Jr. 

Visiting Assistant Professor H. Kenneth Bechtel 

ii A major in sociology requires thirty-seven credits and must include Sociology 
51, 371, and 372. A minimum average of 2.0 in sociology courses is required at the 
me the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all sociology 
Durses is required for graduation. 

A minor in sociology requires twenty credits and must include Sociology 151 and 
ociology 371. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in sociology courses is re- 
uired at the time the minor is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 
i sociology courses is required for certification as a minor. Students who intend 



Ihese courses are attached to the Department of Romance Languages for administrative purposes only. 



V 



154 

to pursue a sociology minor are encouraged to notify the department early in their 
junior year, and they are invited to participate in all departmental functions. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Sociology" highly qualified ma- 
jors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program. 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfac- 
torily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information members 
of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

151. Principles of Sociology. (4) General introduction to the field; social organiza- 
tion and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and other aspects. 

152. Social Problems. (4) Survey of contemporary American social problems. P— 
Sociology 151. 

205. Photography in the Social Sciences. (4) Explores the use of photography as 
a research technique for the social sciences; camera and darkroom instruction in- 
cluded. P— Permission of instructor. 

248. Marriage and the Family. (4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing the 
problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

301. Religion as a Social Institution. (4) A study of the various forms of religion, 
such as denomination, cult, sect. The relationship between religious factors and 
other social factors. Civil religion and religiosity in the US. P— Sociology 151. 

302. Bureaucracy and Society. (4) The sociological analysis of complex organiza- 
tions focusing on bureaucracy, power, authority, decision making, and change. At- 
tention will be given to business as well as government and other non-profit organiza- 
tions. P— Sociology 151. 

305. Male and Female Roles in Society. (4) Changing male and female roles in the 
context of societal institutions and sociological theories that explain such changes. 
Consideration of feminism as a social movement and of consequences of changing 
roles for human interaction. P— Sociology 151. 

309. Sex and Human Relationships. (4) Study of the societal forces that impinge 
on human sexual behavior, emphasizing the effects of social change, the implica- 
tions of changing gender roles, crosscultural and subcultural variations, and the 
influence of the mass media. P— Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

310. Death and Dying. (2) Study of some of the basic issues and problems of modern 
man in accepting and facing death. P— Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

311. Women in Professions. (4) Emphasis on the status of women in professional 
occupations (e.g., law, medicine, science, business, etc.) in socio-historical perspec- 
tive. P— Sociology 151. 

325. Self and Society: An Interact ionist Perspective. (4) An analysis of the effects 
of social relationships upon self-development, self-preservation, and the learning 
of social roles and norms, with special emphasis on language and symbolic inter- 
action. P— Sociology 151. 

333. The Urban Community. (4) A survey of materials relating to the community 
as a unit of sociological investigation, with emphasis on the urban setting. Of par- 



155 



ticular value for social work or community planning. P— Sociology 151 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

334. Society and Higher Education. (4) An analysis of the social forces that shape 
educational policies in the US. Assessment of significant contemporary writings 
on the manifest and latent functions of education. P— Sociology 151. 

335. Medical Sociology. (4) Analysis of the social variables associated with health 
and illness and with the practice of medicine. P— Sociology 151. 

337. Aging in Modern Society. (4) Basic social problems and processes of aging. 
Social and psychological issues discussed. Course requirements will include field 
placement in a nursing home or similar institution. P— Sociology 151 and permis- 
sion of instructor. 

=■339. Sociology of Violence. (4) A survey of the societal factors associated with in- 
idividual and collective violence. Discussion will focus on the contemporary and 
[historical conditions which have contributed to various patterns of violence in 
i American society. P— Sociology 151. 

340. Sociological Issues in Human Development. (4) Socialization through the life 
span in the light of contemporary behavioral science, emphasizing the significance 
|of changes in contemporary society. P— Sociology 151. 

341. Criminology. (4) Crime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of treat- 
ment, and prevention. P— Sociology 151. 

342. Juvenile Delinquency. (4) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; an 
examination of prevention, control, and treatment problems. P— Sociology 151 and 
permission of instructor. 

343. Sociology of Law. (4) Consideration will be given to a variety of special issues: 
conditions under which laws develop and change, relationships between the legal 
and political system, the impact of social class and stratification upon the legal order. 
P— Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

344. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior. (4) A sociological analysis of the nature 
and causes of and societal reaction to deviant behavior patterns such as mental 
illness, suicide, drug and alcohol addiction, sexual deviation, and criminal behavior. 
P— Sociology 151. 

345. The Police and Society. (4) A study of the position and the role of police in 
modern society. Examination of the nature of social control in human societies, the 
role of the police in social control, the police in France, England, and the United 
States. P— Sociology 151. 

346. Seminar on Social Utopias. (4) Survey of major Utopian literature; emphasis 
is placed upon both the social organization in Utopian proposals and their implicit 
critique of current society and social ideologies. P— Sociology 151. 

347. Society, Culture, and Sport. (4) An examination of the interrelationship of sport 
and other social institutions. Emphasis on the study of both the structure of sport 
and the functions of sport for society. P— Sociology 151. 



V 



156 

348. Sociology of the Family. (4) The family as a field of sociological study. Assess- 
ment of significant historical and contemporary writings. An analysis of the struc- 
ture, organization, and function of the family in America. P— Sociology 151. 

349. Sociology of Science. (4) Emphasis on the origins and growth of science in 
socio-historical perspective, reciprocal relations between science and society in th( 
twentieth century, science as a social system. P— Sociology 151 or permission a! 
instructor. 

350. Mass Communications and Public Opinion. (4) The study of the increasing 
importance of collective behavior, emphasizing the relationship between the media 
and a changing society. P— Sociology 151. 

358. Population and Society. (4) Techniques used in the study of population data 
Reciprocal relationship of social and demographic variables. P— Sociology 151. 

359. Race and Ethnic Relations. (4) Racial and ethnic group prejudice and 
discrimination and their effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psychological 
and sociological theories of prejudice. P— Sociology 151. 

360. Social Stratification. (4) The study of structured social inequality with par- 
ticular emphasis on economic class, social status, and political power. P— Sociology 
151. 



: i 



361. Sociology of the Black Experience. (4) A survey and an analysis of contem- 
porary writings on the status of Black Americans in various American social in- 
stitutions (e.g., education, sport, entertainment, science, politics, etc.). P— Sociology 
151. 

365. Dependency Needs and Social Services. (4) Examination of various forms ol 
dependency, such as social, economic, emotional, and physical, and community 
social agencies designed to meet these needs. Use of relevant literature, field ex 
perience, and resource persons. 

371, 372. The Sociological Perspective. (4, 5) A two-semester course dealing with ,, 
the development and application of major theories and research methods in 
sociology. A continuing effort is made to enable the student to deal with current ... 
theoretically oriented research. Regularly scheduled computer labs will be arrang- 
ed during the Sociology 273 portion of the course. P— Sociology 151 and permis- ; 
sion of instructor. 

380. Social Statistics. (4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in survey research, 
(A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for Biology ' 
348, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Anthropology 380. A sociology major may 
take Anthoropology 380 in lieu of Sociology 380 to meet major requirements.) ! 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (4) Intensive investigation of current scien- I 
tific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems of contemporary 
interest. P— Permission of instructor. )i 



398, 399. Individual Study. (1-4, 1-4), Reading, research, or internship courses 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out 
under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 



157 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

\ Donald H. Wolfe, Chairman 

Professors Julian C. Burroughs Jr., Franklin R. Shirley, Harold C. Tedford 
i Associate Professors Michael D. Hazen, Donald H. Wolfe 

Assistant Professor Jill Jordan McMillan 
Visiting Assistant Professor Jo Whitten May 
Instructor David C. Williams 
Visiting Lecturer James H. Dodding 
1 Lecturers Jonathan H. Christman, Caroline S. Fullerton, Mary R. Wayne 

For convenience in advising majors, the department divides the study of speech 

jrtmunication and theatre arts into the following fields: (1) communication/public 

dress, (2) radio/television/film, (3) theatre arts, and (4) speech pathology/correc- 

»n. It is possible for a student either to concentrate in one of the first three fields 

' to take courses across the breadth of the discipline. Specific courses of study 

1" both majors and minors are worked out in consultation with departmental faculty 

ambers. 

jA major in speech communication and theatre arts consists of a minimum of for- 
P credits, at least eight of which must be at the 300 level. In order for a course 
count toward a student's major, the student must earn a grade of C or higher 
ji! the course. 

j\ minor in the first three fields listed in the first paragraph above requires six 
jurses for a minimum of twenty-four credits, at least eight of which must be at 
•2 300 level. 

Those students majoring in speech education and theatre arts are expected to take 
ecific courses which meet the requirements for teacher certification. Information 
icerning the courses may be obtained from departmental faculty members, 
lighly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
i honors program in speech communication and theatre arts. To be graduated 
rah the designation "Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts," they 
rast successfully complete 281. For additional information members of the depart- 
mental faculty should be consulted. 

'■■). Special Seminar. (2-4) The intensive study of selected topics in communica- 
t n. Topics may be drawn from any theory or concept area of communication, such 

< persuasion, organizational communication, film, or theatre. 

' . Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (4) A conference course 
i olving intensive work in the area of special interest for selected seniors who wish 
I graduate with departmental honors. P— Permission of instructor. 

V-. Individual Study. (1-4) Special research and readings in a choice of interest 
1, be approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. P— Permission of instructor. 

'> ; 284. Debate, Raido/Television/Film, or Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) Individual 
] ijects in the student's choice of debate, radio/television/film, or theatre arts; in- 

< des organizational meetings, faculty supervision, and faculty evaluation. No stu- 

< it may register for more than two credits of practicum in any semester. No stu- 



// 



158 

dent is allowed to take more than a total of eight credit units in practicum, onl 
four credits of which may be counted toward a major in speech communicatio 
and theatre arts. Pass/Fail only. P— Permission of instructor. 

Communication/ Public Address 









i 

151. Public Speaking I. (4) A study of the nature and fundamentals of speech con 
munication. Practice in the preparation and delivery of short speeches. 

152. Public Speaking II. (4) The preparation and presentation of short speech* 
to inform, convince, actuate, and entertain. P— Speech Communication 151. 

153. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts: con 
munication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group interactioi 

155. Group Communication. (4) An introduction to the principles of discussion an, 
deliberation in small groups, with practice in group problem-solving and discu, 
sion leadership. 

156. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, with ea 
phasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

161. Voice and Diction. (4) A study of the principles of voice and production, wit* 
emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

251. Persuasion. (4) A study of the variables and contexts of persuasion in conferr 
porary society. 

252. Argumentation and Debate. (4) A study of the principles of argumentatioi 
practical experience in researching and debating a public policy question. 

253. The Rhetoric of Western Thought. (4) A survey of the major theories in rheto: 
from Plato to Burke, with emphasis on rhetorical criticism. Students apply I 
historical/critical method to the rhetoric of contemporary movements. 

261. Clinical Management of Speech and Language Disorders. (4) Methods use] 
to correct speech disorders of voice, rhythm, language, and articulation; observf 
tion of methods used with selected cases in clinical or public school setting 
Offered in alternate fall semesters. 

262. Audiology. (4) Clinical audiology, including anatomy, physiology, disorde 
of the hearing mechanism, and interpretations of basic measurements of audita 
function. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

263. Speech and Language Disorders I. (4) Study of the disorders of language, a 
ticulation, and rhythm, with special emphasis on functional disorders; focus is 
the role the therapist plays in assisting the speech-handicapped child. Offered 
alternate fall semesters. 

264. Speech and Language Disorders II. (4) Consideration of etiology and syirt 
toms of speech and language problems due to organic disorders of voice, artic 
tion, language, and hearing. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

271. Communication Theory. (4) An introduction to theory-building in communic 



1 



159 



iin and to the major contemporary theorists in the field. P— Speech Communica- 
<n 151 or permission of instructor. 

D. Special Seminar. (2-4) (See previous description.) 

1. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

2. Individual Study. (1-4) (See previous description.) 

\% 284. Debate Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

}. British Public Address. (4) A historical and critical survey of leading British 
•sakers and their speeches from the sixteenth century to the present. 

1. American Public Address. (4) The history and criticism of American public 

dress from colonial times to the present. 
t 
55. Directing the Forensic Program. (2, 4) A pragmatic study of the methods of 

"ecting high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate 

'->rkshop. Offered in the summer. 

). The Rhetoric of Race Relations. (4) A study of race relations in America as 
"lected in the rhetoric of selected black and white speakers. Students apply the 
torical/critical method in exploring the effects of discourse on attempts at inter- 
ial communication. 

\ The Rhetoric of the Women's Movement. (4) A study of selected women ac- 
I'ists and the impact of their speeches and arguments from the 1800s to the pre- 
i it. Emphasis on the "New Feminist Movement." 




160 



371. Research in Communication. (4) An introduction to design and statistical pro- 
cedures for research communication. 

372. A Survey of Organizational Communication. (3, 4) An introduction to the role 
of communication in organizations, with emphasis on field applications. 

373. Intercultural Communication. (4) An introduction to the study of communica- 
tion phenomena between individuals and groups with different cultural 
backgrounds. 

374. Mass Communication Theory. (3, 4) Theoretical approaches to the role of com- 
munication in reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of com- 
munication. Offered in alternate years. 

375. Communication and Conflict. (4) A study of communication in conflict situa- 
tions on the interpersonal and societal levels. Offered in alternate years. P— Speech 
Communication 153 or permission of instructor. 

376. Small Group Communication Theory. (4) Advanced study of the principles 
of small group interaction and discussion leadership. P— Speech Communication 
155 or permission of instructor. 

378. Semantics and Language Behavior. (4) A study of the syntactic and semantic 
aspects of communicative messages. 



Radio/Television/Film 

141. Radio-TV Speech. (2) An introduction to announcing and performing on radio 
and television. 

241. Introduction to Broadcasting. (4) A study of the historical, legal, economic, 
and social aspects of broadcasting. 

242. Radio Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of radio production. 

243. TV Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of television production. 

245. Introduction to Film. (4) Historical introduction to motion pictures through 
the study of various kinds of films and their relationship to society. 

246. Film Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of motion picture production. 

280. Special Seminar. (2-4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (1-4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Radio/Television/Film Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

342. Seminar in Radio/Television. (3 or 4) Extensive readings in and discussion 
of fundamental theory and current issues in radio and television. Offered in spring, 
1986. P— Speech Communication 241. 

344. Advanced Radio Production. (2) Study of advanced radio forms: documen- 
tary and drama. P— Speech Communication 242. 



161 



"t5. Advanced TV Production. (2) Individual production of complex forms of televi- 
an such as documentary and drama. P— Speech Communication 243. 

i s6. Film Criticism. (3 or 4) A study of film aesthetics through an analysis of the 
ork of selected film makers and film critics. Offered in spring, 1985. P— Speech Com- 
unication 245. 

-•8. Advanced Film Production. (2) Individual production of complex films such 
drama, animation, and documentary. P— Speech Communication 246. 



Theatre Arts 

.1. Introduction to the Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre art. Experience 
S laboratory and University Theatre productions. May be used to satisfy a require- 
ent in Division I. Lab— three hours. 

2. Technical Theatre I. (2) An introductory course in the technical aspects of 
leatrical production focusing upon the basic techniques of scene construction, 

stume construction, make-up, and sound. This course is of special interest to 
¥ )tential majors. Offered fall semesters only. P— Theatre Arts 121. 

3. Technical Theatre II. (2) An introductory course in the technical aspects of 
eatrical production focusing upon the basic techniques of mechanical drawing, 
ige lighting, scene painting, and props. This course is of special interest to potential 
ajors. Offered spring semesters only. P— Theater Arts 122. 

4. Drafting for the Theatre. (2) The techniques and terminology used in making 
orking and construction blueprints for theatrical use. P— Theatre Arts 122 and 123. 

.5. Basic Theatrical Lighting. (2) A study of theory and practice of stage lighting. 
-Theatre Arts 122 and 123. 



r 6. Stage Makeup. (2) A study of the theories, materials, and techniques of 
eatrical makeup. P— Theatre Arts 122 and 123. 

7. Costume Construction. (2) An introduction to the fundamental drafting, cut- 
■ Lg, and construction techniques of period theatrical costumes. P— Theatre Arts 122 
d 123. 

1. Mime. (4) An introductory study of basic mime forms. The student will gain 
ills and understanding of this theatrical form through practical exercises, readings, 
learsals, and performances. 

3. Stagecraft. (4) A study of the basic elements of theatre technology. Practical 
perience gained in laboratory and University Theatre productions. Open to 
shmen and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lab— five hours. 

5. Theories of Acting. (4) A study of acting theories and fundamental acting tech- 
jues. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lab— two 
urs. 

1 r . Theatre Speech. (4) An intensive course in the analysis and correlation of the 
ysiological, physical, and interpretative aspects of voice and diction on the stage. 



162 

228. The Contemporary English Theatre. (2, 3, or 4) An examination of the English 
theatre through reading, lectures, seminars, and attendance at numerous live theatre 
performances. The participants are expected to submit written reactions to the plays 
which are seen. Ample time to allow visits to museums, libraries, and historic places. 
Taught in London. P— Permission of instructor. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (1-4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

3110. The English Theatre, 1660-1940. (4) A study of the major developments in 
the English theatre from the Restoration to World War II, including the plays, ' 
playwrights, actors, audiences, theatre architecture, theatre management, costumes, 
and sets. Field trips include visits to theatres, museums, and performances. Offered 
in London. 

316. Acting Shakespeare. (4) A practical study of varying styles in interpreting and 
acting Shakespeare's plays from the time of the Elizabethans to the present day. 
P— Theatre Arts 226. 

317. Theatrical Lighting Design. (4) The intensive study of the tools and aesthetics 
of the designer's craft with practical experience in designing for proscenium, thrust, 
and arena staging. P— Theatre Arts 125. 

318. Theatrical Special Effects. (4) A survey of the various special scenographic and 
lighting effects used in modern theatre. Special emphasis will be placed on effects, 
used in productions done during the term. P— Theatre Arts 223 and 125. 

319. Costume: History and Design. (4) A study of the evolution of costume through 
the ages and the design of historic costume for the stage. P— Theatre Arts 121. 

320. Theatrical Scene Design. (4) A study of the theories and styles of stage desigr 
and their application to the complete play. P— Theatre Arts 121 and 223 or permis 
sion of instructor. 

321. Play Directing. (4) An introduction to the theory and practice of play direct 
ing. A grade is not granted for this course until the student has completed Theatn 
Arts 322. Lab— two hours. P— Theatre Arts 121 and 226 or permission of instructor 

322. Play Production Laboratory. (2) A laboratory in the organization, the tech 
niques, and the problems encountered in a dramatic production. The productioi 
of a play for public performance is required. P— Theatre Arts 321. 

323. Period and Style in Acting. (4) A study of social customs, movement, dances 
and theatrical styles relating to the performance of drama in historical settings a 
well as in period plays. The course includes performances in class. P— Theatre Art 
226. 



324. Advanced Mime. (4) This course enlarges upon skills and techniques acquire 
in Theatre Arts 221 (Mime), with the addition of other mime forms. The course ir 
eludes exercises, rehearsals, and performances. P— Theatre Arts 221. 



163 



325. Advanced Acting. (4) A concentrated study of the actor's art through theory 
and practice. P— Theatre Arts 226 or permission of instructor. 

326. Performance Techniques. (4) A course in advanced acting techniques, focus- 
ing on acting styles appropriate to various modes of theatrical production. Specialized 
techniques such as dance, singing, stage combat, etc., may also be included. P— 
Theatre Arts 226. 

327. Theatre History I. (4) A survey of the development of the theatre from its origins 
to 1870; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

328. Theatre History II. (4) A survey of the development of the modern theatre 
from 1870 to the present day; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

329. Advanced Theatre Speech. (4) Specific study in the theory and personal 
development of vocal melody, rhythm, color, and harmony according to the form, 
style, and mood of a theatrical production. P— Theatre Arts 227 or permission of 
instructor. 

3300. Modern British and Continental Drama. (4) An examination of the works 
of major British playwrights of the modern period (from approximately 1875 to the 
present) to include, among others, Shaw, Galsworthy, Osborne, Shaffer, Stoppard, 
and Bond. At the same time, participants will study plays by major continental 
writers of the same periods, including Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Weiss, Handke, 
etc. Whenever possible, the class will attend performances of relevant plays. Taught 
in London. 

3310. A Survey of English Theatre History. (4) Beginning with the Elizabethan period 
and continuing through the Restoration, the eighteenth century, the nineteenth cen- 
tury, and into the twentieth century, this course will focus on the major periods 
of English theatrical activities, relevant personalities, and representative dramas. 
Field trips, museums, and performances will be part of the study of this course. 
Taught in London. 




// 



164 

School of Business and Accountancy 

Thomas C. Taylor, Dean 

Professors Delmer P. Hylton, Jeanne Owen, Thomas C. Taylor 

Associate Professors Umit Akinc, Leon P. Cook Jr., A. Sayeste Daser, 

Arun P. Dewasthali, Carol Elbing, Stephen Ewing, 

Thomas S. Goho, Dale R. Martin, Ralph B. Tower 

Assistant Professors John S. Dunkelberg, Michael Roberts, Julie Yu 

Lecturer Lee Stokes 

Instructor Olive S. Thomas 

Objectives 

The School of Business and Accountancy has four objectives: 

1. to offer sound academic programs in business and accountancy leadin tv 
the Bachelor of Science degree; 

2. to undertake on a continuous basis the professional development olife 
faculty; 

3. to serve the University community; and 

4. to maintain a productive association with the public, especially the busir s< 
community. 

Two programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree are offeid. 
Students may choose a major in either business or accountancy. 

The primary goal of the business program is to provide a general study of busir ss 
which will enable graduates to enter the business world with a breadth of unci 
standing of relevant business problems and concepts. The general, as opposedc 
specialized, orientation of the major in business is appropriate for Wake Fo st 
University in light of both its strong liberal arts tradition and its small size. 

The major goal of the accountancy program is to prepare graduates for entry-l<el 
positions in public accounting, corporate accounting, and accounting in non-pnt 
organizations. Since accounting practice takes place in the environment of busins, 
the program in accountancy includes the study of the key functions of busirjs 
activity. It is expected that a significant proportion of accountancy graduates ill 
join the staffs of public accounting firms. This expectation is supported by the gal 
of preparing graduates for successful performance on both the professional CA 
examination and the professional staffs which they join after graduation 



Admission 






Admission to the School is by formal application, and applicants will be scree id 
by the Committee on Admission and Continuation of the School of Business ad 
Accountancy. Before being considered for admission to the School, the applied 
first must have been admitted to Wake Forest College. Minimum requirements >r 
admission to the School of Business and Accountancy are completion of sixty-f e 
credits and a grade point average of 2.0 on all courses attempted. 

Students are encouraged to have completed two semesters of Principles if 
Accounting, two semesters of Principles of Economics, and Mathematics 108 or 1 



165 

afore admission to the School. A student who fails to meet these course re- 
nirements may obtain provisional admission. Provisional status is changed to fully 
xepted status when the course deficiencies are removed. The provisional admission 
mst be removed by the beginning of the senior year. 

The number of students who can be accommodated is limited. Therefore, the 
chool reserves the right to grant or to deny admission or readmission to any student 
r ho meets the minimum requirements. Readmission to the School of Business and 
ccountancy first requires readmission to Wake Forest College, requirements for 
'hich are discussed on page 40. 

Transfer of Credit from Other Schools 

It is expected that most work toward degrees offered by the School of Business 
Wrid Accountancy will be taken in the School. For students wishing to transfer credit 
om other schools, the following general guidelines apply: 

( i) Courses at another school passed with the rriinimum passing grade at that school 
may not be transferred. 

?) Courses transferred in business and accountancy are subject to validating 
1 examinations. 

:) No work in courses numbered 200 and above will be accepted from two-year 
; schools. 

i) Courses taken elsewhere in subjects not offered at the School of Business and 
u Accountancy may not be counted toward the credits required in the School of 
' Business and Accountancy. 

j For the BS in business, a minimum of forty credits must be earned in the School 
f Business and Accountancy at Wake Forest University; for the BS in accountancy, 
[j.ie minimum credits earned in this school must total fifty-two. 

c 

-, Requirements for Continuation 

\ In addition to the requirements stated on pages 39-40, a student must be 
< cademically responsible and must show satisfactory progress towards completing 
le requirements for the degree. The Dean of the School of Business and Accoun- 
incy will notify the student if satisfactory progress is not being made and, after 
onsultation with the Committee on Admission and Continuation, will decide if 
ie student may continue as a major in this school. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The School of Business and Accountancy confers the Bachelor of Science degree 
rith majors in accountancy and business. For the major in business, a student must 
omplete the following course work: Accounting 111 and 111; Business 201, 202, 203, 
U, 221, 231, 251, 261, and 271; Economics 151 and 152; Mathematics 108 or 111; 
peech 151 or 153 or 155; and a minimum of two courses from Business 212, 213, 
14, 222, 223, 224, 225, 232, 233, 234, or Accounting courses numbered 200 or above. 

For the major in accountancy, the following course work must be completed: 
^counting 111, 112, 211, 212, 252, 253, 261, 271, and 273; Business 201, 202, 211, 



166 

221, 231, 251, 261, and 271; Economics 151 and 152; Mathematics 108 or 111; and 
Speech 151 or 153 or 155. 

In addition to the courses stipulated above, the student in business and accoun- 
tancy must also meet the following requirements for graduation: 

(a) a minimum of 144 credits, including the basic and divisional requirements 
established by Wake Forest College; 

(b) a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on all work attempted at Wake Forest; 
and 

(c) an overall 2.0 grade point average on all business and accountancy courses, 
exclusive of courses repeated with a C grade or better. 

Senior Honors Program 

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 
on all work in business and accountancy are invited to apply for admission to the 
honors program in business and accountancy. A project, paper, or readings, and 
an oral examination are required. Those who successfully complete the requirements 
specified by the School are graduated with the designation "Honors in Business" 
or "Honors in Accountancy." For additional information interested students should 
consult a member of the faculty of the School of Business and Accountancy. 



Courses of Instruction 

Business 

201. Business Statistics. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, probability theory, sampling theory, statistical inference, cor- 
relation and regression, and non-parametric statistics. 

202. Production and Operations Management. (4) A study of the problems of the 
operations function in organizations, their interfaces with other functional areas, 
and the methods of their solutions. Topics include process selection, forecasting, 
aggregate planning, job shop scheduling, project management, MPvP inventor) 
management, facilities location and design, quality planning and control. P— 
Business 201. 

203. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Development and understanding of quantitative de- 
cision tools and models to be applied to the managerial decision process. Models 
include linear programming (graphic, algebraic, and simplex solutions; sensitivity 
analysis; duality; transportation and assignment algorithm); decision theory; 
PERT/CPM; and queuing. P— Business 202. 

211. Organizational Theory and Behavior. (4) The study of macro and micrc 
organizational design— structure, processes, development, climate, behavior, and 
performance evaluations. P— Junior standing. 

212. Advanced Management of Organizational Behavior. (4) Advanced manage 
ment of problems of behavior and communication— organizational and inter- 



167 

i personal. A comparative multinational perspective and experiential approach, 
developing problem-solving processes for management of human resources. P— 
-Business 211. 

213. History of Management Thought. (4) A study of past and present contribu- 
a tions to the art of management— forces and institutions which control and influence 

the exercise of managerial activities through time. Ethical and philosophical issues 
jj are included. P— Business 211. 

214. Labor Policy. (4) A study of selected topics in labor-management relations in 
f both the business and the public sector from the view of labor, management, and 

the public. P— Business 211. 

221. Principles of Marketing. (4) A study of the role of marketing in business and 
the economy. Emphasis is on the examination of marketing concepts, functions, 
^institutions, and methods. P— Economics 151. 

1222. Marketing Strategy. (4) Managerial techniques in planning and executing 
marketing programs in business and nonbusiness organizations. Emphasis is on 
" the group experience in decision making related to market segmentation, product 
" innovation and positioning, channels of distribution, pricing, and promotion. Ex- 
" tensive use of cases, readings, and team presentations. P— Business 201 and 221. 

223. International Marketing. (4) Study of problems and opportunities in marketing 
overseas, analysis of cultural, economic, and political environment of foreign 
marketing operations, organization, and control of the multinational company. P— 
Business 221, Economics 152, and senior standing. 

224. Marketing Research. (4) Introduction to fundamentals of research methodology 
I and use of research information in marketing decision making. Topics include 
> research design, data collection methods, scaling, sampling, and alternate methods 

of statistical data analysis. Students design and execute their own research projects. 
j P— Business 201 and 221. 



V 



168 






225. Buyer Behavior. (4) Study of basic behavioral science applications in buye 
motivation and behavior and in buying decisions. Emphasis on current researcl 
and theory relating to consumer behavior. P— Business 221. 

231. Principles of Finance. (4) An introduction to the field of finance includin; 
financial management, investment analysis, and financial institutions and markets 
Emphasis is placed on financial management at the level of the business entity o 
non-profit organization. P— Accounting 112, Business 201, and Economics 151 and 151 

232. Advanced Financial Management. (4) Management decision-making appliei 
to the financial function, including investment, financing, dividend, and workin 
capital decisions and their impact on the value of the firm. P— Business 231. 

233. Investment Analysis. (4) Study of investment alternatives, expected return; 
and corresponding risks; valuation of stocks and bonds applying both fundamer 
tal and technical analysis; survey of past and current methods of stock selectio, 
techniques, including portfolio considerations. P— Business 231. 

234. Multinational Financial Management. (4) Analysis of the international aspect 
of managerial finance. Emphasis upon institutional and environmental factor 
influencing capital acquisition and allocation. P— Business 231. 

251. Management Information Systems. (4) Study of the development, design, an 
implementation of management information systems with introduction to th 
terminology, concepts, and trends in computer hardware and software. P— Busine* 
211. 

261. Legal Environment of Business. (4) A study of the legal environment in whic 
business decisions are made in profit and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is pi 
upon how the law develops and how economic, political, social, and ethical coi 
siderations influence this development. 

271. Business Policy. (2) Application of the case method to problems of busine; 
policy formulation and strategic planning. P— Business 202, 211, 221, and 231. 

281. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) Directed study in specialized areas t 
business. P— Permission of instructor. 






Accountancy 

111. Accounting Principles I. (4) The basic accounting process and underlying pri 
ciples pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financi 
statements. 

112. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accounting 111 and an introdt; 
tion to management accounting. P— Accounting 111. 

211. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related pr 
blems for typical accounts in published financial statements. P— Accounting 11 



169 



212. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accounting 211. P— Accounting 

bi. 

252. Cost Accounting. (4) Advanced study of management accounting, including 
-budgeting, product-costing, cost allocation, standard costs, transfer-pricing, differen- 
G tial analysis, and cost-behavior analysis. P— Accounting 112. 

1 253. Accounting Information Systems. (4) A study of the design and operation of 
accounting systems relating to the functions of purchasing, production, sales, and 

I cash management. Emphasis is placed upon the necessary controls for reliable data. 

; Includes hands-on experience with micro-computer accounting applications. P— 
Accounting 252 and Business 251. 

. 254. Accounting in the Not-for-Profit Sector. (4) An examination of accounting theory 
; and practice in governmental and eleemosynary organizations. P— Accounting 211. 

t261. Advanced Accounting Problems. (4) A study of the more complex problems 
found in business operations, business combinations, reorganizations, and dissolu- 
tion. P— Accounting 212. 

- 271. Income Tax Accounting. (4) A survey of basic income tax concepts associated 
with individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. Introduction to tax 
research and planning. P— Accounting 212. 

273. Auditing. (4) Examination of basic auditing concepts and relationships, and 
i the auditor's reporting and professional responsibilities. Study of auditing procedures 

commonly used in public accounting and internal auditing. P— Accounting 212 and 

3 252. 

274. CPA Review-Law. (4) A study of the law applicable to business transactions 
fc with accounting and auditing implications, including representative questions from 

the business law section of the CPA exam. Open only to senior accounting majors. 
, P— Business 261. 

275. CPA Review-Accounting Practice and Theory. (4) An intensive study of CPA- 
j type problems found on the accounting practice and accounting theory sections 

of the CPA exam. P— Accounting 252 and 261. 

278. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) Directed study in specialized areas of ac- 
countancy. P— Permission of instructor. 



V 



170 



Degrees Conferred 



May 16, 1983 

Bachelor of Arts 



Willard Paul Ackley 

George Ray Adams 

Mary Marshall Agee, cum laude 

Anderson Bradford Alcock 

Pamela Sue Aldridge 

Jane Hart Alexander 

Cynthia Kay Allen, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Jennifer Jane Allen, cum laude 
Mary Elizabeth Allen, cum laude 
Lisa Jean Carson Allison, cum laude 
Kay Anderle 
Richard H. Arnold 
Jennifer Lynn Ashley, cum laude 
Barry Douglas Austin 
Judd Allen Austin, Jr., cum laude 
Carl Glenn Ayers, cum laude 
Maria Elaine Ayers, magna cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
David Rupert Bagby 
Robert Gregory Bailey, cum laude 
Craig Price Baker, magna cum laude 
Karen Renee Barbour 
Allison Jo Bare 

Teresa Vaughan Barnes, cum laude 
Yvette Melinda Barnes 
Karen J. Bartel 
Plato Collins Barwick III 
David Gray Baugh, cum laude 
Susan Payne Beauchamp, cum laude 
Guy Moody Beaver III 
Ann Reid Beh 
Mark Alan Bennett 
Armando Berguido, cum laude 
Sonja Rene Berry, cum laude 
Jane Anne Bess, magna cum laude 
Charles Frederick Bethel 



Jeffrey Donald Bilas, cum laude 

Carol Jean Bishop, cum laude 

Warren Dale Bishop 

Cheryl Balckwell, cum laude 

Christopher Lyons Blake, cum laude 

Jeanine Anne Blake 

Donna Jean Blankenship, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
William David Block, cum laude 
Carolyn Hall Blue 
Lynn Elizabeth Booth 
Sharon Lee Boothe 
Steven Robert Bosin, cum laude 
Larry Donald Bowden Jr. 
Rodney Trent Bowen 
Victoria Ann Bowers, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Donna Lynn Boyd, cum laude 
Stephen John Boyle, cum laude 
Susan Elizabeth Bray, cum laude 
Lisa Love Brothers 
Carol Lane Brown, cum laude 
Stephen Robert Brown 
Billy Lee Buff Jr., summa cum laude 
William Campbell Buhrow, cum laude 
Edward Bungener 
Lee Annette Burroughs, cum laude 
Michael Erick Burton, cum laude 
Shannon Lynn Butler 
Donna Frances Campbell 
Mary Scott Campbell, magna cum laudi 
Kevin Kenneth Carpenter 
Joseph Patrick Carroll Jr. 
Seavy Wesley Carroll, cum laude 
Bryan Allen Catron 
Steven R. Catron, cum laude 
John Taylor Chaffin Jr. 



; 



171 



nes Harell Chesson, magna cum laude 

ii Marie Clark 

ary Dawne Clark 

?orge Harris Clayton, cum laude 

trick Caswell Cloniger 

ivid Scott Cobb, magna cum laude 

resa Gay Cockerham 

lomas Bryce Cogsil 

:toria Ruffin Collett 

;nise Regina Coogler, magna cum laude, 

vith honors in speech communication 

ind theatre arts 

gather D. Cooper, cum laude 

irol Lane Copeland 

dry Ann Copenhaver, cum laude 

ephen David Charles Corts, 

:um laude, 

vith honors in politics 

ott Michael Cottrill 

ny Elizabeth Crews 

frey Lloyd Crook, cum laude 

iniel Thomas Cummins 

in Gregg Cusick, cum laude 

illiam Taylor Davis, magna cum laude, 

vith honors in history 

aire Heddens D'Ecsery, cum laude 

m Marie Degnan, cum laude 

ivid Wayne Demianovich 

mberly Jeane Dennis 

mne Marie Dillenger 

cqueline Louise Dinan, cum laude 

bio Agustin Diodati, cum laude 

uy Robert Doten 

ra Marie Dougherty, cum laude 

ymond Thomas Doyle Jr. 

ivid Gardner Draper 

iristopher Albert Dromerick 

leodora Marguerite Drozdowski, 

nagm cum laude 

ark Stanley Drusdow 

ivid Murray Dunlap 

illiam Patrick Dunne 

ark Howard Eckert, cum laude 

cy Claire Edelmann, magna cum laude, 

vith honors in English 

ic Robert Edgerton, summa cum laude 



Aleta Faye Edwards 

Iva Jeanette Edwards, cum laude 

Christopher James Ehlers 

Jeffrey Thane Elliott 

Betty Carol Ellison 

Angela Anne Elmore 

Sarah Ruth Emmett 

William Norbert Evans, cum laude, 

with honors in economics 
Genevieve Garrou Exum 
Richard Paul Faude 
Robin Dawn Faulk 
John Edward Faulkner III 
Robert Brian Fazia, cum laude 
Ann Gray Ferguson 
Brooke Tillou Ferguson 
Isabel Maria Fernandez, magna cum laude 
Bryan Gregory Fitcher, cum laude 
Glenn Scott Fitzgerald 
Paul Townsend Flick, cum laude 
Robert Andrew Fouts 
Kenneth Robert Francis, cum laude 
Carol Jean Frederick 
James Robert Fredericks 
Craig Thompson Friend 
Curtis Michael Frund 
Thomas Matthew Fryar 
Samuel Weathers Gaines, cum laude 
Melissa Virginia Gainey 
Michael Joseph Gallo, magna cum laude 
Emma Sue Gardner, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
James Hugh Gardner, magna cum laude 
Mary Rebecca Garrison 
Eric Thomas Gerber, cum laude 
Cynthia Dee Gibson 
Thomas Russell Gira, magna cum laude, 

with honors in economics 
Alison Louise Gitter 
Jeffrey Watkins Gjerde 
Karen Jean Glenn 
Marvin Douglas Godley magna cum 

laude 
Douglas L. Gordon, cum laude 
Eddie LeRoy Green 
Jeffrey Nelson Greene 



V 



172 



Jerry Wayne Greene Jr. 

Wayne Eric Greenough 

James Thomas Greenwell 

James Robert Gregg Jr. 

Mary Haller Griffin 

Robert Hugh Griffin, cum laude 

Kimberly McCabe Grimes, cum laude 

Joal Rechelle Hall 

Allen Willard Hamrick, summa cum laude 

Robert Cranston Hannon II 

William Clinard Hardaway 

Sally Blakey Harlan 

Ann Carrington Harman, cum laude 

Phillip Blackmon Harris Jr. 

Lloyd Herritage Harrison Jr. 

Carol Priscilla Harriss 

Debra Fretwell Harton, cum laude 

Douglas Glen Hartsema, cum laude 

Lillian Renee Hasty 

David Joseph Hausman 

Zachary Bruce Hayes 

Leonard Steven Haynes 

Mary Ellen Heaphy, cum laude, 

with honors in speech communication 

and theatre arts 
Teresa Ann Heavner, magna cum laude 
Janell Dene Heflin, cum laude 
Karl Daniel Heininger, cum laude 
Teresa Gayle Henley 
Kevin Shawn Hennessy 
Christopher Lee Herrick 
Alfred Paul Hertzog Jr. 
Johnna Raye Hewitt 
John Robert Hilley 
Karen Jane Hills, cum laude 
Shaun Patrick Hines, magna cum laude 
Walter Rickert Hinnant 
Karen Fay Hinshaw 
William Howell Hinson, cum laude 
Leslie Padgett Hitchings 
Susan Emelia Hochstetler 
Amy Sue Hoey, cum laude 
Jerome Alison Holmes, cum laude 
Charles Mark Holt 
Bradford Forrester Hood 
James Richard Hood Jr., cum laude 



Miriam Virginia Hughes, summa cum 

laude 
David Broomell Humpton, cum laude 
Carolyn Elizabeth Hunter, cum laude 
Robert Stephen Hyatt 
Steven Craig Ireland 
Anita Louise Izzi 
Craig Steven Jabloner 
Cabot Lee Jaffee Jr. 
Curtis Scott Jamison 
Martha Ann Jarvis 
Theresa Carol Johannson, cum laude 
Elbert Neil Johnson III 
Linda DeAnn Jones 
Mary Elizabeth Jones, summa cum laude 
Michael David Jones, cum laude, 

with honors in English 
Neal Ray Jones, summa cum laude 
Leslie Ann Kell, cum laude, 

with honors in English 
Patricia Joan Keller, cum laude 
Paul Charles Kemeny, cum laude 
Peter John Kemeny, magna cum laude 
Mary Charlotte Kerbaugh, cum laude 
David Gene King, cum laude 
Jane McLean King 
Sara Nelson King, cum laude 
Mark Ottis Kinlaw 
Jonathan Dale Kirkendall, cum laude 
Brian David Knauth, cum laude 
Scott Halsey Kolb 
Vasif Karaca Kortun, cum laude 
Patricia Anne Koury, cum laude 
Susan Lyn Krahnert 
Susan Ann Krissinger, magna cum laude 
Mark Steven LaFave, cum laude 
John Mark Landreth 
Frank Lash III 

Kathleen Elaine Lassiter, cum laude 
Theodore Peterson Lauer 
Kathi Meribeth Laxton 
Laura Virginia Leak 
Derreka Smith Ledbetter 
Andrea Ledgerwood 
Nancy Chalmers Lee, cum laude 
Todd Anthony Leight, cum laude 



I 

I 



173 



Janet Ellen Lethcoe 
i Jefferson Hoover Lindquist 
i John Durant Lineberger 

Robin Lynn Lockerman 

Mark Kenneth Long 

William Ellison Long III 

Alicia Kaye Lopes 

Andrew Guy Lyons 

David Bruno Mancuso 

Lisa Kaye Mann, magna cum laude 

David Bryan Manning, magna cum laude 

Alan Hammond Mark, magna cum laude 

Charles Rochelle Martin, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
! Randall David Martin 
. Morris Craig Massey, magna cum laude 

Mary Susan Mast, cum laude 

Jeanne Kye Matthews, magna cum laude 

Barbara Anne Maxwell, cum laude 

Ashley Ervin McArthur, cum laude 

Laura White McCaskill, cum laude 

Kimberly McCracken, cum laude 

David Andrew McDonald 

Harold L. McDonald Jr., cum laude 

Nathan O'Berry McElwee Jr. 

Jeffrey McGill 

John Hoyt McLaughlin II 

Sherwood Brock McLendon, cum laude 

Sarahan McNeil 

Emily McNiff, cum laude 

Kurt Anthony McPherson 

Michael Scott McTammany 

Andrew James Megas 

Amy Lynn Meharg, cum laude, 
with honors in Romance languages 

James W Melton Jr., magna cum laude 

Eric J. Metzler 

Cheryl Katherine Miller, cum laude 

John Nathaniel Walker Miller 

Edward Dean Mills 

Donald Paul Millsaps II 

Robert H. Miltenberger III, cum laude 

Michael Wayne Moore 

Roger Byron Moore Jr. 

Christina Marie Moran, 
magna cum laude, 
with honors in psychology 



Lisa Kathleen Motts 

Beth Frances Murphy 

Gregory M. Murphy 

Timothy Peter Murphy 

Llew Ann Murray 

Tara Leigh Myler 

Peter Richard Nagel 

Charles Ellis Neal 

Andrew Scott Neish, cum laude 

Raymond Douglas Nelson 

James Stuart Nesbit 

William Everett Newell, cum laude 

Carolyn Burns Newsome, cum laude 

James Todd Newton 

William Philipp Nichols 

Leslie Martin Noble 

Tom Nordhoy 

Kathryn Elizabeth Norris 

Theodore William Nunez 

Julia Anne Oakman 

Spencer George Olsen, cum laude 

Julie Ann Ontko, cum laude 

Deirdre Brigid Parker, cum laude 

David Alan Paro 

Franklin Loten Paschal Jr. 

John Wylie Passacantando 

Janine Marie Paul 

Rubert Benjamin Pearce III, cum laude 

Walter Curtis Pearcy, magna cum laude 

Daniel Seymour Pearson 

Sophie Whitener Peden 

Julia Dickinson Perry, cum laude 

Carole Anne Peters, magna cum laude 

Laurie May Petty 

Melissa Daryl Phillips 

Lisa Ann Spaugh Pilcher, cum laude 

Steven Miller Plaxco, cum laude 

Thomas Jenkins Plummer 

Gary Lynn Poling, cum laude 

Christine Anne Pontillo 

Mary Gravatt Porter, cum laude 

Stephen Prescott Potter, cum laude 

Lorri Blackwood Potts 

Jaye Paige Powell, cum laude 

Johnny De-Wayne Powers, magna cum 

laude 
Ann Clark Preuitt, cum laude 



V 



174 



John Mott Price 

Hollis Louise Prichard 

Lori Elizabeth Privette, cum laude 

David Brian Puzzo 

Thomas Radulovic, cum laude 

David Blair Ramsey, cum laude 

Zenia Raudsepp 

Keith Alan Raye, cum laude 

John Thomas Raymond II 

Ginny Hayes Raynor, cum laude 

Carole Denise Rector 

Mytrae Reddy 

Patricia Alice Reed 

Susan Carol Reese, cum laude 

Charles Donald Reeves 

James Patrick Reidy 

Tracy Anne Reitz 

William Edward Reynolds 

Jeralyn Charlette Rhue 

William Thomas Rice II, cum laude 

Amy Janel Rodriguez 

Allen Click Rogers 

Elizabeth Ann Rogers 

Robert Travis Rogerson 

Lisa Anne Rote, cum laude 

M. Robert Rowell Jr. 

Clay Cole Rucker 

Kathy Jane Rust, magna cum laude 

Harrison Rogers Rutter 

Amy Lynn Sanborn, cum laude, 

with honors in sociology 
Karen McQueen Sandberg, cum laude 
Lisa Jean Sanford 
Frank Henry Schneider III 
Pamela Ann Schroeder, cum laude 
Susan Meares Schulken, summa cum 

laude 
Gail Karen Schultz 
Carol Lynn Schulz, cum laude, 

with honors in biology 
Susan Elizabeth Schwenk 
Melissa Joyce Seagle 
Lucy Katherine Shaner 
Jeffrey Stephan Shannon, cum laude 
Susan Mary Sharpe 
Perry Elizabeth Shelly 



Irvin Scott Shendow 

Geoffrey Watson Shorter 

Robert John Shuttlesworth, cum laude 

David Arthur Siegel, cum laude 

William Reginald Sigmon Jr., 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in biology 
Patrick Merrill Slenski 
Katherine Bailey Smith 
Lisa Christian Smith 
Mariel Melissa Smith, cum laude 
Mickey Lee Smith 
Terri Lynn Smith, cum laude 
Thelma Alison Smith, cum laude 
Sheila Annette Spainhour 
Keith Peter Spoto, cum laude 
Richard Causey Stanland III 
Katherine Louise Stealey 
Gerald Kenneth Stephens Jr. 
John Wesley Stewart III 
Martha Anne Stewart 
Loyd Wade Stokes Jr. 
Melanie Shea Stone 
Emily Williams Streett, cum laude 
Neal Edward Stump 
John Dale Swider 
Leslie Anne Talbert, cum laude 
Vivian Anne Tedford, cum laude 
Mercedes Maria Teixido, cum laude 
Elizabeth Gordon Terry, magna cum laude 
Tracy Jeanette Thompson, cum laude 
Otho T. Townsend III 
Lee Jordan Vernon 
Charles Carter Via, cum laude 
Richard S. Wagner III 
Elizabeth Davidson Waite 
Andrew Hollis Wakefield, 

summa cum laude, 

with honors in philosophy 
Bradley Knox Walker 
Michael Edwin Walker, cum laude 
Geoffrey Hanes Wall, cum laude 
George Hampton Wall Jr. 
Horace Edward Walpole Jr. 
Sally Evelyn Ware 
Charlene Washburn, cum laude 



175 



Valerie Catherine Watson 
Jennifer Fair Weatherspoon 
Laurie Frances Weinel 
Chloe Jean Wellons 
Kathryn Marie Welsh 
Craig William Weltge, cum laude 
Joel Adams Weston III 
Lawrence Boyd Whitaker 
Wade Edward White, cum laude 
James Frank Whitehead 
Margaret Emma Whiteside, magna 

cum laude 
Jeffrey Alan Whitt, magna cum laude, 

with honors in history 



Alexandra Louisa Wilcox 

Alison Jean Wiley 

Deana Rae Williams 

Gary Alvin Williams 

Sean D. Williams, cum laude 

Peggy Dee Williford 

Linda Jean Wilson, cum laude 

Krista Kaye Windham 

Linda Denise Windley 

Thomas Daniel Womble 

Franklin Harris Wood III 

Mara Jacquelyn Wortman 

Kathryn Ann Wright 

Phyllis Franklin Wright, cum laude 



Bachelor of Science 



Celia Catherine Alford 
Rel David Ambrozy 
Melissa Ann Atkinson, summa cum laude 
Charles Wilson Averre IV 
Helen Rhymer Barkhouser, cum laude 
Albert Hartwell Best IV 
Hubert Scott Black, cum laude 
Lynn J. Bryan 
Nell Garrell Bullard 
Lou Ann Compere, cum laude 
. Deborah Jean Cothran 
Elizabeth Lynn Denning 
Mark Kenneth Dirks 
Diana Christine Doster, cum laude 
Keith Alan Engelke, cum laude 
Scott Garrison Ferner 
Taizo Fujiki 
James Theodore Gentry, 

summa cum laude, 

with honors in economics 

and mathematics 
David Phillip Gibbon 
Elizabeth Dale Gilley 
Catherine Louise Guerster 
Todd Leroy Herman, summa cum laude 
Debra Carol Holmes 
Deborah Ann Hough, cum laude 



Anthony Lanberth Hudnell 

Mary Adele Huizenga 

Susan Penelope Humphrey, cum laude 

Elizabeth Louise Huntley, magna cum 

laude 
Martha Lee King, magna cum laude 
John Williams Knapp Jr., cum laude 
Lynn Miller Kohler 
Scott MacLaren Lawrence, cum laude 
Mark S. Lee 
Susan Jean Lockland 
Ina DeAnn Macon, magna cum laude 
Cheryl Lynn Malehorn, cum laude 
Charles David Mast 
Samuel Edwin McBride Jr., cum laude 
Michael John McMahon 
Michelle Marie Milne, cum laude 
Jeffrey Cornell Moser, magna cum laude 
Gwenn Louise Naylor, cum laude 
Marlene Kay Poff, summa cum laude 
William McLaren Pritchard 
Alan Jordan Reid 
Russell Babers Rhodes Jr. 
John Cabell Richardson 
Randal Jay Riddle, cum laude 
Mitchell Edward Skroski 
Peter Albert Spung, cum laude 



V 



176 



Robyn Lee Stacy, cum laude 
Timothy Frederick Summers 
Donna Lynne Tennant, cum laude 
David Reid Thompson 



Edward Milton Thompson Jr. 
Barbara Jane Williams, magna cum laude 
John Howard Wood, cum laude 
Peter Michael Young 



Bachelor of Science 
School of Business and Accountancy 



Donald Eugene Abernathy 

Bret Dennis Allen 

Kathryn Davenport Amatruda, 

cum laude 
Guy Joseph Andrysick, cum laude 
Jeffrey Alan Arditti 
Frank Leroy Bailey 
Warren Walter Bates 
John Matthew Bond 
Mary Jane Bower 
Gregory Scott Bowman, cum laude 
Daniel Marcus Boyd 
John Craig Bradfield 
Scott Emerson Bradway 
Glenn Royal Bridgers 
Richard John Brock 
Linda Lea Brueggeman 
Mahlon Michael Burket 
Patricia Ann Campbell 
James Malcolm Clarke Jr. 
Diane Carol Clayton 
Bradd Beeson Craver 
Beverly Jane Daugherty 
Christopher Richard Dedera 
William Kent Dickinson 
Dawn Marie Dobbings, magna cum laude 
Douglas J. Donatelli 
John Joseph Donnelly 
Cheryl Lynne Downs 
Mark Livingston Drew 
Jill Elizabeth Driver 
Renee M. Duval 
Donald Claus Ehlers Jr. 
John Cullom Eller 
Thomas Harold Fowler 
Sateria Hairston Fulton 
Ghio Suiter Gavin 



Susan Annette Geer 
Christopher Lawrence Glacken, 

cum laude 
Eric Neal Greene 
Pamela Jane Hackler 
Robert Charles Haggerty 
Linda Elizabeth Hales 
Andrew Tyler Hamrick 
David Anthony Hanby 
Gary Hugh Hayes, cum laude 
Holly Jean Henderson, cum laude 
Beth Aleece Herion 
Sarah Elizabeth Heuerman 
Brian James Hickey 
David Walter Hitchcock, cum laude 
Mary Elizabeth Hunt 
Scott David Juvelier 
Gregory Keoleian 
Mark Charles King 
Rebecca Paget Lange 
Terry Matthew Lease 
Amy Camille Leonard 
Lindsey L. Locklear 
Kerrie Gray Long 

Tamara Sue Martin, magna cum laude 
Edward Reid Matthews 
Susan Carol Maxwell 
Sharon Mazeau, cum laude 
Mary Lucille Moore, summa cum laude 
Theresa Ann Mosso 
Sean Timothy O'Donnell 
Michelle Renee Peters 
Gary Wayne Phillips 
Dawn Maureen Powers, cum laude 
Helen Rebecca Smith Presnell 
Tara Lynn Raines 
Mary Virginia Roach, cum laude 



177 



Donna Gwen Robinson 
David Malcolm Sanders 
Robin Frances Scherer, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Charles L. Schorgl Jr. 
Andrew Benson Seay, cum laude 
Lark Alane Shea, cum laude 
Charles Dale Slate 
Gerald Francis Smith Jr. 
Lauran Gayle Smith, magna cum laude 
Lisa Robertson Smith, cum laude 
Richard Craig Stabler 
Karin Leslie Stephenson 
David F. Stevens 
Richard Samuel Stroup 



Susan Davis Swanson, cum laude 

Carroll David Swenson 

Tracie Deene Talley 

Robert Taylor Thornton III 

Steven Robert Tucker 

Suzanne Lynn Underberg 

Linda Christine Wagner 

Zana Evelyn Wall 

Charles Anderson Warner III 

Melanie Elise White, cum laude 

Herbert Wayne Whitesell 

Judith Ann Wiley, cum laude 

Nancy Paul Williams, magna cum laude 

Stephen David Yarborough 




178 



August 6, 1983 
Bachelor of Arts 



Michael Clay Ackard 

Frederick Stanley Black Jr. 

Timothy Blanc, cum laude 

William Alfred Bower 

Patrick Eugene Cain 

David Roy Cantrell, magna cum laude 

Jack Franklin Coffey Jr. 

Gregory Alan Eller 

Stephen Kenneth Enns 

Joseph Fernandez 

Vincent Matthew Graessle 

John W. Graham 

Jose Miguel Grave de Peralata Jr., 

cum laude 
Farah Diba Bembury Hill 
Michael Royce Hough 
Evia LaVerne Jordan 



James Weller Keever 

Sarah Lynn Lancaster, cum laude 

Ellen Lisa Marx 

Thomas Hartman McDowell III 

Steven Hunt McKenzie 

Sheri Elizabeth Michalec 

Michael Guy Mullen 

Bradley Nix 

Shelley Anne Seifarth 

Nelson John Squires III 

Kirsten Marianne Steintrager 

Sharon Jean Taylor 

Jacqueline Jeanette Thompson 

Leslie Anne van Houten, 

summa cum laude 
Sidney A. White 



August 6, 1983 
Bachelor of Science 



Jasper Lee Holland III 



Barbara Kim White 



Keith John Nachilly 



School of Business and Accountancy 



Glenda Karen Cable 
Robert John Dixon 
Michael James Foley 
William Hinson Gallagher II 
Keith Weber Martinet 



Robert Perry Nethery 
Lynne Jones Parsons 
Philip Ballard Raiford Jr. 
J. Carson Sublett Jr. 



December 20, 1983 
Bachelor of Arts 



Cynthia Kay Austin 
Martha Elizabeth Bagwell, 

summa cum laude, 
with honors in sociology 



Jane Garrison Bailey, summa cum laud 
John Miles Bates 
Robert Glenn Bilbro 
Jana Avis Brown 



179 



■Fred C. Bryan 

Jeffrey Allen Cleveland, cum laude 
Michael John Coleman, 
summa cum laude 

Christopher Douglas Andrew Din- 
Michael Joseph Edens, magna cum laude 
Deborah Lou Eller 
Virginia Harris Galluzi 
Susan Joan George, cum laude 
William Frederick Gordon 
Warren John Grundman 
Vlark Crosbie Hamblin 
Steven Reed Hammond 
Robert Dean Harris 
Steven Allan Hoskinson, cum laude 
ames Preston Hutcherson, 

magna cum laude 
Edgar Owen Kinnier III 



Anthony Michael Luper 

Paula Suzanne Mabe 

John Thomas Mills Jr. 

Tina Julianna Morgan 

Margaret Hines Newbern 

Pamela Morris Patrick, summa cum laude 

Kathryn Anne Ashburn Pike 

David Covington Sears 

Kenton Rickard Lawrence Simon 

Allyson Paige Stanley 

Elizabeth Anne Stephens 

Louise Frances Stephens 

Norman E. Stump 

Jane Cary Tiller, cum laude 

Jeffrey Peter-Matthew Warner, cum laude 

William Bradley White 

Tina J. Williams 



Jernard Francis Figlock 
Zharles Alden Goodie 
Susan Michelle Gough 
Teresa Faye Parton 



December 20, 1983 
Bachelor of Science 



Gary Broderick Scholfield 

Penny Darlene Towe 

Sherry Diane Wright, cum laude 



School of Business and Accountancy 



'hilip Alan Denfeld, cum laude 

Oavid Lyman Guidry 

onathan Edward Head 

oseph Kenneth Hughes Jr., cum laude 

jary A. Miller 



Donnie Allen Smith, cum laude 
Rosalie Madeleine Thomas 
Naoki Toyoda 
Jill Elizabeth Weaver, cum laude 



180 



Honor Societies 



lynthia Kay Allen 



Judd Allen Austin Jr. 
Charles Mark Holt 



Mortar Board 

Members of the Class of 1983 

Omicron Delta Kappa 

Members of the Class of 1983 

ODK & Mortar Board 



Members of the Class of 1983 



Susan Elizabeth Bray 
James Harrell Chesson 
Pablo Agustin Diodati 
James Theodore Gentry 
Holly Jean Henderson 
Miriam Virginia Hughes 
Michael David Jones 



Jeanne Kye Matthews 
Amy Lynn Meharg 
Mary Lucille Moore 
Dawn Maureen Powers 
Andrew Benson Seay 
Melanie Elise White 
Jeffrey Alan Whitt 



Melissa Ann Atkinson 
Maria Elaine Ayers 
Craig Price Baker 
Jane Anne Bess 
Billy Lee Buff Jr. 
James Harrell Chesson 
David Scott Cobb 
Denise Regina Coogler 
William Taylor Davis 
Dawn Marie Dobbings 
Mark Howard Eckert 
Lucy Clare Edelmann 
Eric Robert Edgerton 
Isabel Maria Fernandez 



Phi Beta Kappa 

Members of the Class of 1983 

Jill Carol Fink 
Michael Joseph Gallo 
James Hugh Gardner 
James Theodore Gentry 
Marvin Douglas Godley 
Allen Willard Hamrick 
Teresa Ann Heavner 
Shaun Patrick Hines 
Miriam Virginia Hughes 
Elizabeth Louise Huntley 
Mary Elizabeth Jones 
Neal Ray Jones 
Peter John Kemeny 
Marie Elizabeth King 



181 



Martha Lee King 
Amanda Joy Loggins 
' Lori Ann London 
ilna DeAnn Macon 
Lisa Kaye Mann 
David Bryan Manning 
Alan Hammond Mark 
Tamara Sue Martin 
Morris Craig Massey 
Jeanne Kye Matthews 
James Willard Melton Jr. 
Mary Lucille Moore 
Christina Marie Moran 
Jeffrey Cornell Moser 
Pamela Morris Patrick 
1 Walter Curtis Pearcy 



Carole Anne Peters 
Marlene Kay Poff 
Johnny De-Wayne Powers 
Dino Antonio Ross 
Kathy Jane Rust 
Susan Meares Schulken 
William Reginald Sigmon Jr 
Lauran Gayle Smith 
Elizabeth Gordon Terry 
Leslie Ann van Houten 
Andrew Hollis Wakefield 
Jeffrey Alan Whitt 
Barbara Jane Williams 
Nancy Paul Williams 
Janet Elaine Woodruff 




V 



182 



Enrollment 



The College 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassified 

Total 



Fall 1983 






Men 


Women 


Total 


468 


304 


772 


453 


274 


727 


490 


293 


783 


503 


333 


836 


11 


18 


29 



1,925 



1,222 



3,147 



The Graduate School 

(Reynolda Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 

Total 



81 


138 


219 


1 


3 


13 


12 


11 


23 



103 



152 



255 



The Graduate School 

(Hawthorne Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 

Total 

The School of Law 



7 


10 


17 


39 


34 


73 


3 


1 


4 


49 


45 


94 


331 


168 


499 



The Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Master's Program 
Executive Program 

Total 



134 
86 



220 



47 
15 



62 



181 
101 



282 



The Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 

Allied Health Programs 



305 
47 



123 
66 



428 
113 



Total 



2,980 



1,838 



4,818 



183 



Geographic Distribution — Undergraduates 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 



Aen 


Women 


Total 


5 


2 


7 


1 





1 


1 





1 





2 


2 


16 


2 


18 


1 


1 


2 


44 


10 


54 


22 


7 


29 


3 


4 


7 


138 


85 


223 


81 


53 


134 


1 





1 


1 





1 


25 


9 


34 


5 


4 


9 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 


16 


18 


34 


1 


1 


2 





2 


2 


107 


58 


165 


28 


5 


33 


13 


1 


14 


5 





5 


1 





1 


6 


6 


12 











1 





1 











3 


1 


4 


122 


35 


157 











106 


23 


129 


749 


624 


1,373 











47 


17 


64 


1 


2 


3 


1 





1 


82 


34 


116 


4 


1 


5 


43 


36 


79 











31 


26 


57 



r/ 



184 



Texas 

United States Territories 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Belgium 

Brazil 

Canada 

People's Republic of China 

Colombia 

Denmark 

Dominican Republic 

Greece 

India 

Italy 

Japan 

Kenya 

Mexico 

Netherlands 

Peru 

Phillipines 

Saudi Arabia 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

Venezuela 



Other Countries 



5 


10 


15 


1 


1 


2 




















149 


104 


253 











29 


23 


52 


7 


3 


10 











ries 

Men 


Women 


Total 


1 


1 


2 





1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





1 





2 


2 


1 





1 


1 


1 


2 





1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 





1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 





2 


2 


3 


1 


4 


1 





1 



185 



The Board of Trustees 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 



?becca Almon, Winston-Salem 
ibert L. Butler Jr., Winston-Salem 
;bert L. Davis Jr., Winston-Salem 
:tro Kulynych, Wilkesboro 
tnes W Mason, Laurinburg 



Katharine B. Mountcastle, New Canaan, 

Connecticut 
W. Boyd Owen, Waynesville 
Leon L. Rice Jr., Winston-Salem 
T. Eugene Worrell, Charlottesville, 

Virginia 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 



;rt L. Bennett, Winston-Salem 
:>bert P. Caldwell Sr., Gastonia 
1 Stuart Dickson, Charlotte 
ayd Fletcher, Durham 



Jean H. Gaskin, Charlotte 
Weston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem 
Alton H. McEachern, Greensboro 
J. Robert Philpott, Lexington 



J. Smith Young, Lexington 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1986 



lly L. Blackwell, Winston-Salem 
Henry Crouch, Charlotte 
maid Deal, Hickory 
oria Flippin Graham, Wilson 
nes Johnson, Rowland 



L. Glenn Orr Jr., Winston-Salem 
Arnold Palmer, Youngstown, 

Pennsylvania 
Charles L. Snipes, Goldsboro 
Colin Stokes, Winston-Salem 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1987 



seph Branch, Raleigh 

uise Broyhill, Washington, DC 

i Wayne Calloway, Purchase, 

>Jew York 

sink R. Campbell, Statesville 



Constance F. Gray, Winston-Salem 
William W Leathers III, Rockingham 
W. Harold Mitchell, Valdese 
D. E. Ward Jr., Lumberton 
Richard A. Williams, Newton 



Officers 

(For one-year terms beginning January 1, 1984) 

eston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem, Chairman 

Robert Philpott, Lexington, Vice-Chairman 

on H. Corbett Jr., Winston-Salem, University Counsel and Secretary of the 

University and Secretary to the Board of Trustees 

"in G. Williard, Winston-Salem, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary 

omble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, Winston-Salem, General Counsel 



V 



186 



The Board of Visitors 



Arnold Palmer, Youngstown, Pennsylvania 
Chairman, University Board of Visitors 

J. Tylee Wilson, Winston-Salem 
Chairman, College Board of Visitors 

Wake Forest College and Graduate School 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1984 



David Bryant, South Charleston, 

West Virginia 
Aurelia Gray Eller, Winston-Salem 
Anne Cannon Forsyth, Winston-Salem 
Frank Forsyth, Winston-Salem 
Stanley Frank, Greensboro 
Edward Gould, Atlanta, Georgia 
Jack Hatcher, Hanover, New Hampshire 



Nancy C. Kester, New York, New York 
Connie Williams King, Nashville, 

Tennessee 
John F. McNair III, Winston-Salem 
Wayne Oates, Louisville, Kentucky 
Lorraine F. Rudolph, Winston-Salem 
Frank Willingham, Houston, Texas 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1985 



Herbert Brenner, Winston-Salem 
F. Hudnall Christopher Jr., 

Winston-Salem 
E. Garland Herndon, Atlanta, Georgia 
Thomas W. Lambeth, Winston-Salem 
Robert Maloy Washington, DC 



K. Wayne Smith, Chicago, Illinois 
Leland T Waggoner, New York 

New York 
Meade Willis, Winston-Salem 
J. Tylee Wilson, Winston-Salem 
Judy Woodruff, Washington, DC 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1986 



Diana Moon Adams, Bartlesville, 

Oklahoma 
Kenneth G. Adams, Bartlesville 

Oklahoma 
Samuel H. Adler, Rochester, New York 
Ralph Ellison, New York, New York 
Paul P. Griffin, Boston, Massachusetts 



Harold T P. Hayes, New York, 

New York 
Albert R. Hunt Jr., Washington, DC 
Joseph S. Iseman, New York, 

New York 
Martin Mayer, New York, New York 
Eugene Owens, Charlotte 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1987 



Charles Blitzer, Research Triangle Park 
Jeanette W Carl, Raleigh 
John Chandler, Williamstown, 

Massachusetts 
Barbara Massey Clark, Brentwood, 

Tennessee 
Edward E. Crutchfield Jr., Charlotte 
Merrimon Cuninggim, Winston-Salem 



Charles U. Harris, Delaplane, Virginia 
Lawrence D. Hopkins, Winston-Salem 
Hubert Humphrey, Greensboro 
Roberto J. Hunter, Scarsdale, 

New York 
Jean F. Lybrook, Clemmons 
James Alfred Martin, Roxboro 
Russell W Meyer Jr., Wichita, Kansas 



187 



Arthur E. Earley, Cleveland, Ohio John R. Reardon, Santa Fe, 

Bill Greene Jr., Elizabeth ton, Tennessee New Mexico 
Zachary T. Smith, Winston-Salem 

Ex Officio Members 

William H. Flowe Sr., President, Alumni Council, Burlington 

Katharine B. Mountcastle, Trustee Liaison, New Canaan, Connecticut 

Constance F. Gray, Alternate Trustee Liaison, Winston-Salem 




188 






The Administration 



Date following name indicates year of appointment 



University 

Thomas K. Hearn Jr. (1983) 

BA, Birmingham-Southern; BD, Southern Baptist Seminary; 
PhD, Vanderbilt; LHD, Alabama-Birmingham 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Harvard 



President 



Provost 






Vice President for Health Affairs am 
Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Mediant 

i 
Vice President and Treasure) 



Richard Janeway (1966) 
BA, Colgate; 
MD, Pennsylvania 

John G. Williard (1958) 

BS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); CPA, North Carolina 

John P. Anderson (1984) Vice President for Administration anc 

BS, MS, PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology; Planning 

MBA, Alabama-Birmingham 

G. William Joyner Jr. (1969) 
BA, Wake Forest 



Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Leon Corbett (1968) 

BA, JD, Wake Forest 



Vice President for University Relation'. 

Assistant to the President anc 
Director of Communication'. 

University Counse\ 

and Secretary 

of the University 



College 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) 

BA, Rollins; MA, PhD, Emory 

Toby A. Hale (1970) 

BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Duke; EdD, Indiana 

Patricia Adams Johansson (1969) 

BA, Winston-Salem State; MA, Wake Forest 

William S. Hamilton (1983) 
BA, MA, PhD, Yale 

Graduate School 

Gerald W Esch (1965) 

BS, Colorado College; MS, PhD, Oklahoma 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 
BA, MA, PhD, Minnesota 



Dean of the Colleg, 
Associate Deai 
Assistant Deai 
Assistant Deai 

Dean of the Graduate Schoo 

Associate Dean jo 
Biomedical Graduate Studie 



189 



School of Law 



)hn D. Scarlett (1955, 1979) 
BA, Catawba; JD, Harvard 

obert F. Clodfelter (1981) 
LLB, Duke 

Varies H. Taylor (1976) 
BS, JD, Wake R)rest 

uan K. Hooks (1970) 



Dean of the School of Law 

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

Director of Continuing Legal Education 



Director of Admissions and 
Assistant to the Dean 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



obert W. Shively (1982) 

BA, Colgate; MEd, Harvard; PhD, Cornell 

:imes M. Clapper (1975) 
BS, MS, Rensselaer; 
PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

. Ban B. Hopson (1970) 

BA, Murray State; MS in LS, George Peabody; 
MBA, Wake Forest 

1 ruce R. Holliday (1981) 

BA, Davidson; MBA, Wake Forest 

ernard L. Beatty (1983) 

BS, Ohio State; MBA, DBA, Harvard 

Jvar Elbing (1983) 
BA, Minnesota; 
BS, California (Berkeley); MS, California State 
(Sacramento); PhD, Washington (Seattle) 

1 Willisia Holbrook (1982) 

BA, Mercer; MEd, EdD, Georgia 



Dean of Babcock Graduate School 
of Management 

Associate Dean 



Assistant Dean 

Director of Admissions 

Director of MBA Executive Program 

Director of the Institute for 
Executive Education 



Director of Career Planning 
and Placement 



Bowman Gray School of Medicine 



1 ichard Janeway (1966) 

BA, Colgate; MD, Pennsylvania 

fatE. Smith (1976) 

BA, Erskine; MD, Georgia 

Kiffin Penry (1979) 
BS, MD, Wake Forest 

tarold O. Goodman (1958) 
BA, MA, PhD, Minnesota 

lyde T. Hardy Jr. (1941) 
BA, Richmond 



Vice President for Health Affairs 
and Dean 

Associate Dean 



Associate Dean for Research Development 

Associate Dean for 
Biomedical Graduate Studies 

Associate Dean for Patient Services 



V 



190 



Warren H. Kennedy (1971) 
BBA, Houston 

John D. Tolmie (1970) 

BA, Hobart; MD, McGill 



Associate Dean for Administration and 
Director, Division of Resource Management 

Associate Dean for Student Affairs 



Emery C. Miller Jr. (1955) Associate Dean for Continuing Education 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MD, Johns Hopkins 



John H. Felts (1978) 

BS, Wofford; MD, South Carolina 

Palmer A. Dalesandro (1982) 
AB, Villanova 



Associate Dean for Admissions 
Associate Dean for Information Service!: 



James C. Leist (1974) Assistant Dean for Continuing Educaton 

BS, Southeastern Missouri State; MS, EdD, Indiana 



Lawrence D. Smith (1983) 
BS, MS, Illinois 



Assistant Dean for Research Developmem 



School of Business and Accountancy 



Thomas C. Taylor (1971) 

BS, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); 
PhD, Louisiana State; CPA, North Carolina 

Summer Session 

Percival Perry (1939, 1947) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Rutgers, PhD, Duke 

Student Services 

John P. Anderson (1984) Vice President for Administration am 

BS, MS, PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology; Planning 

MBA, Alabama-Birmingham 



Dean of the School of Businesi 
and Accountancy 



Dean of the Summer Sessiot 



Lula M. Leake (1964) 

BA, Douisiana State; 

MRE, Southern Baptist Seminary 

Mark H. Reece (1956) 
BS, Wake Forest 

Terrence M. Curran (1984) 
BA, MS, Rhode Island 

Shannon E. Browne (1984) 
BA, MEd, EdF, Virginia 

Edward R. Cunnings (1974) 
BSM, MEd, St. Lawrence 

Michael Ford (1981) 



BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Assistant Vice President fo 
Administration and Planning 

Dean of Student: 

Assistant Dean of Student: 

Assistant Dean of Students fo 
Residence Lif 

Director of Housing 
Director of the College Unioi 



Ross A. Griffith (1966) 
BS, Wake Forest; 
MEd, North Carolina (Greensboro) 



Planning Analyst and Directo 
of Space Managemen 



191 



ian M. Austin (1975) Director of the University Counseling Center 

, BA, Monmouth; MSEd, PhD, Southern Illinois 



arianne Schubert (1977) 

BA, Dayton; MA, PhD, Southern Illinois 

,-ary Ann H. Taylor (1961, 1978) 
BS, MD, Wake Forest 



Assistant Director of the University 
Counseling Center 

Director of University Student 
Health Services 



Campus Ministry 

Igar D. Christman (1956, 1961) 

BA, JD, Wake Forest; BD, Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 
STM, Union Seminary 

Wid L. Fouche (1982) 
BA, Furman; 
MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Seminary 



Chaplain 



Assistant Chaplain and 
Baptist Campus Minister 



Records and Institutional Research 



m M. Seelbinder (1959) 

BA, Mississippi Delta State; 

MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 
P 
argaret R. Perry (1947) 

BS, South Carolina 

allie S. Arrington (1977) 
, BA, Wake Forest 

. Lynn Crocker (1982) 
BS, Wake Forest 



iirry R. Henson (1981) 

BA, Berea; MS, Missouri 



Computer Center 



Personnel 



Director of Records and 
Institutional Research 



Registrar 
Assistant Registrar 
Assistant Registrar 

Director of the Computer Center 



mes L. Ferrell (1975) Director of Personnel 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MS, Virginia Commonwealth 

Admissions and Financial Aid 

\ 

'illiam G. Starling (1958) Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

BBA, Wake Forest 

tirley P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admissions 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MA in Ed, Wake Forest 

'. Douglas Bland (1975) 

BA, MA in Ed, Wake Forest 



Assistant Director of Admissions and 
Financial Aid 



lomas D. Phillips (1982) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest 

artha Allman (1982) 
BA, Wake Forest 



V- 



Assistant Director of Admissions and 
Scholarship Officer 

Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor 



192 

Ramona J. Leftwich (1981) Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor ami 

BA, Wake Forest Assistant to the Director 

of Minority Affairs 

Educational Planning and Placement 

N. Rick Heatley (1970) Director of Educational Planning 

BA, Baylor; MA, PhD, Texas and Placement 

Communications and Publications 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

BA, Wake Forest Director of Communications 

Jane Naylor Roberson (1961) Assistant Director of Communications 

BA, Wake Forest 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) University Publications Editor 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MBA, Wake Forest 

Terry Hydell (1982) Assistant University Publications Editor 

BA, Oberlin 



University Relations 



G. William Joyner Jr. (1969) Vice President for University Relations' 

BA, Wake Forest 

Julius H. Corpening (1969) Director of Development 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, Southern Baptist Seminary and Estate Planning 

Robert T. Baker (1978) Director of Corporate Relations and 

BA, MS, George Peabody the Babcock Fund 

Sandra C. Connor (1981) Director of Foundation Relations 

BA, North Carolina (Charlotte); MEd, Converse 

Lyne S. Gamble (1978) Development Officer 

BA, Millsaps 

Karen Haynes Sistare (1981) Development Officer 

BA, Wake Forest 

Robert D. Mills (1972) Director of Alumni Activities 

BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Molly Welles Lineberger (1983) Director of the College Fund 

BA, Wake Forest 

Robert D. Thompson (1982) Assistant Director of Alumni Activities 

BA, Wake Forest 

Minta Aycock McNally (1978) Assistant to the Vice President 

BA, Wake Forest for University Relations 

Henry B. Stokes (1977) Director of Denominational Relations 

BA, Wake Forest; ThB, Southern Baptist Seminary 

Graylyn Conference Center 

Albert P. Ginchereau Jr. (1983) Director of Graylyn 

BS, Nevada (Las Vegas); MEd, Niagara Conference Center 



. 



193 



t Financial Affairs 

,ihn G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

BS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); CPA, North Carolina 

irlos O. Holder (1969) Controller and Assistant Treasurer 

U BBA, MBA, Wake Forest 

1 Derald Hagen (1978) Assistant Controller 

BS, Virginia Polytechnic 

Libraries 

errill G. Berthrong (1964) Director of Libraries 

BA, Tufts; MA, Fletcher; PhD, Pennsylvania 

chard J. Murdoch (1966) Assistant to the Director and 

j BA, Pennsylvania Military; MS in LS, VUlanova Curator of Rare Books 

i;nneth A. Zick II (1975) Director of Law Library Services 

BA, Albion; JD, Wayne State; MLS, Michigan 

ivian L. Wilson (1960) Librarian of the School of Law 

BA, Coker; BS in LS, George Peabody 

an B. Hopson (1970) Librarian of the Babcock Graduate 

BS in Ed, Murray State; School of Management 

MS in LS, George Peabody; MBA, Wake Forest 

i 

f.ichael D. Sprinkle (1972) Librarian of the Bowman Gray 

BA, MS in LS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) School of Medicine 

Athletics 

- . Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

BS, Wake Forest; MEd, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); EdD, George Peabody 

orothy Casey (1949) Director of Women's Athletics 

BS, North Carolina (Greensboro); MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Other Administrative Offices 

Jicholas B. Bragg (1970) Executive Director of Reynolda House 

BA, Wake Forest 

r Cleve Callison (1982) WFDD Station Manager 

BA, Duke; MA, PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

ldrey L. Carr (1983) Director of the Educational Media Center 

BA, MA, Wake Forest 

, chard T. Clay (1956) Director of University Stores 

BBA, Wake Forest 

lomas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Education 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, George Peabody; PhD, Ohio State 

ctor Faccinto (1978) Director of the Art Gallery 

BA, MA, California 

ian Gorelick (1984) Director of Choirs 

BA, Yale; MM, Wisconsin-Madison 



V 



194 



Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959) 

BS, Duke; PhD, Brown 

David W. Hadley (1966) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Harvard 

David B. Levy (1976) 

BM, MA, PhD, Eastman 

John H. Litcher (1973) 

BS, Winona State; MA, PhD, Minnesota 

J. Rodney Meyer (1980) 
BA, Brown; 
MA, PhD, Minnesota 

Harold S. Moore (1953) 
BME, Virginia 

James Reid Morgan (1980) 
BA, JD, Wake Forest 

Martin Province (1982) 
BA, Wake Forest 






Coordinator of the Honors Program 

Coordinator of London Programs 

Director of the Artists Series 

Director of Teacher Education 






Director of the Office for Grants and 
Contracts and Activities Coordinator 



Director of the Physical Plant 
Director of Equal Opportunity 



Assistant Director of Instrumental Ensembles 
and Director of Bands 



Harold C. Tedford (1965) 

BA, Ouchita; MA, Arkansas; PhD, Louisiana State 



Director of Theatre 



George William Trautwein (1983) Director of Instrumental Ensembles 

BMus, Oberlin; MMus, Cleveland Institute of Music; MusD, Indiana 



David C. Williams (1982) 

BA, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

BS, MS, Southern Illinois; PhD, Cornell 



Director of Debate 
Associate Director of Theatre 







195 

The Undergraduate Faculties 

'auline Adams (1983) Lecturer in English 

BA, Brooklyn College; MA, Columbia (Part-time, Fall 1983) 

■ Valter Adams (1983) Reynolds Visiting Professor of Economics 

BA, Brooklyn College; MA, PhD, Yale (Fall 1983) 

i 'eter J. Adolf (1983) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

BA, St. Bonaventure; MS, Southern California 

i Jmit Akinc (1982) Associate Professor of Business 

in BS, Middle East Technical (Turkey); 

MBA, Florida State; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

» Iharles M. Allen (1941) Professor of Biology 

BS, MS, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke 

^ina Stromgren Allen (1984) Associate Professor of Biology 

BS, Wisconsin; MS, PhD, Maryland (Spring 1984) 

Ualph D. Amen (1962) Professor of Biology 

BA, MA, Northern Colorado; MBS, PhD, Colorado 

iohn L. Andronica (1969) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

BA, Holy Cross; MA, Boston College; PhD, Johns Hopkins 

! ohn William Angell (1955) Professor of Religion 

BA, Wake Forest; STM, Andover Newton; 
., ThM, PhD, Southern Baptist Seminary 

Aaya Angelou (1982) Reynolds Professor of American Studies 

LittD, Smith, Lawrence, Columbia College (Chicago), Atlanta, 
Wheaton; LHD, Mills, Wake Forest, Occidental, Arkansas, 
Claremont, Kean 

lianca Artom (1975) Lecturer in Romance Languages 

ilrian M. Austin (1975) Lecturer in Psychology 

BA, Monmouth; PhD, Southern Illinois 

!U. Wallace Baird (1963) Adjunct Professor of Chemistry 

BA, Berea; PhD, Wisconsin 

iusan E. Balinsky (1980) Instructor in Physical Education 

BS, SUNY (Oneonta); MS, Indiana 

I. Pendleton Banks (1954) Professor of Anthropology 

BA, Furman; AM, PhD, Harvard 

imes P. Barefield (1963) Associate Professor of History 

BA, MA, Rice; PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Richard C. Barnett (1961) Professor of History 

BA, Wake Forest; MEd, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

3hn V. Baxley (1968) Professor of Mathematics 

BS, MS, Georgia Tech; PhD, Wisconsin 

I. Kenneth Bechtel (1981) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA, MA, North Dakota 



V 



196 



Robert C. Beck (1959) 
BA, PhD, Illinois 

Donald B. Bergey (1978) 
BS, MA, Wake Forest 

Merrill G. Berthrong (1964) 

BA, Tufts; MA, Fletcher; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Deborah L. Best (1972, 1978) 



BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Professor of Psychology 

Instructor in Physical Education 
(Part-time 



Associate Professor of Histon 

i 

Associate Professor of Psychology 



David Bindman (1977) 

BA, MA, Oxford; PhD, Courtauld 

J. Rody Borg (1983) 
BA, Huntingdon 



Lecturer in Art History (London 
(Part-time 

Visiting Instructor of Economic 
Associate Professor of Musi 






Susan Harden Borwick (1982) 

BM, BMP, Baylor; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Germaine Bree (1973) Kenan Professor of Humanitie 

Licence, EES, Agregation, Paris; (On leave, Fall 1983 

LittD, Smith, Mount Holyoke, Alleghany, Duke, Oberlin, 
Dickinson, Rutgers, Wake Forest, Brown, Wisconsin (Milwaukee), 
New York, Massachusetts, Kalamazoo, Washington (St. Louis), 
University of the South, Boston College, Wisconsin (Madison); 
LHD, Wilson, Colby, Michigan, Davis and Elkins 
LLD, Middlebury 

Robert W. Brehme (1959) 

BS, Roanoke; MS, PhD, North Carolina 



Professor of Physic 



Max E. Brewer (1982) Assistant Professor of Military Scienc 

BA, Carson Newman; MS, Tennessee (Knoxville) 



Carole L. Browne (1980) 

BS, Hartford; PhD, Syracuse 

Robert A. Browne (1980) 

BS, MS, Dayton; PhD, Syracuse 

David B. Broyles (1966) 

BA, Chicago; BA, Horida; 

MA, PhD, California (Los Angeles) 

George McLeod Bryan (1956) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; BD, PhD, Yale 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966) 

BA, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Jerry M. Burger (1980) 



BS, MS, California State (Fresno); PhD, Missouri (Columbia) 



Assistant Professor of Biolog 

Assistant Professor of Biolog 

Associate Professor of Politic 
(On leave, 1983-84 

Professor of Religm 
(On leave, Spring 1984 

Professor of Romance Language 
Assistant Professor of Psycholog 



Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Michigan 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke 



Professor of Speech Communicatio 
Professor of Mathematic 



197 



ndide Carrasco (1981) 

L es L, M es L, Montpellier (France) 

Mace Carroll (1974) 

BLitt, Marquette; LLD, Duke; 
L LittD, Wake Forest, Marquette 

in A. Carter Jr. (1961) 
I BA, Virginia; MA, PhD, Princeton 

rwart Carter (1982) 
i BME, Kansas; MS, Illinois; PhD, Stanford 

frothy Casey (1949) 
L BS, North Carolina (Greensboro); 
MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

pid W. Catron (1963) 

BA, Furman; PhD, George Peabody 

r rnthia L. Caywood (1981) 

J BA, Kansas; MA, PhD, Exeter (England) 

lathan Hugo Christman (1983) 
AB, Franklin and Marshall 



Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Romance Languages 

Sam }. Ervin University Lecturer 
(Part-time) 

Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Lecturer in Speech Communication 
and Theatre Arts 
(Part-time) 



irk A. Cichock (1982) 

BS, Wisconsin (Steven's Point); MA, South Carolina 

^axine L. Clark (1980) 

BA, Cincinnati; AM, PhD, Illinois 

in E. Collins (1970) 



Instructor in Politics 
(Part-time) 



Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Associate Professor of Religion 



BS, MS, Tennessee; BD, Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 

PhD, Princeton 
'I 
try A. Cook (1975) 

BEA, Michigan State; MFA, Northern Illinois 

ion P. Cook Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BS, Virginia Polytechnic; MS, Tennessee; CPA, Arkansas 



Assistant Professor of Art 
(On leave, Fall 1983) 



ancy J. Cotton (1977) 

BA, Texas; MA, Wisconsin; PhD, Columbia 

■>clone Covey (1968) 
BA, PhD, Stanford 

:hardH. Crocker (1983) 

BA, Hawaii; MA, Southern California 

tricia M. Cunningham (1978) 

BA, Rhode Island; MS, Florida State; 
EdS, Indiana State; PhD, Georgia 

yeste A. Daser (1978) 

BA, Middle East Tech (Ankara); MS, Ege (Izmir); 
PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Jw M. L. Davis (1983) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BSc, University College (Cardiff); PhD, University of East Anglia 



Associate Professor of English 

Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

Associate Professor of Education 

Associate Professor of Business 



198 



Arun P. Dewasthali (1975) 

BS, Bombay; MS, PhD, Delaware 

John F. Dimmick (1961) 

BS, MS, Western Illinois; PhD, Illinois 

Ronald V. Dimock Jr. (1970) 

BA, New Hampshire; MS, Florida State; 
PhD, California (Santa Barbara) 

James H. Dodding (1979) 



Jerome R. Dollard (1980) 

BA, St. Benedict's; STB, Belmont Abbey; 
MA, PhD, Catholic 

Nancy Dominick (1983) 

BA, North Carolina (Greensboro); 

MS, Radford; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Thomas E. Dougherty Jr. (1977) 



Associate Professor of Business 
Associate Professor of Biology 



Professor of Biology 
(On leave, Fall 1983) 

Visiting Lecturer in Theatre 
(Spring 1984) 

Adjunct Professor of Religion 
(Part-time) 

Visiting Lecturer in Education 
(Part-time, Fall 1983) 



) 



BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, PhD, Southern Baptist Seminary 



Visiting Lecturer in Religion 



(Part-time) 



Robert H. Dufort (1961) 
BA, PhD, Duke 

John S. Dunkelberg (1983) 

BS, Clemson; MBA, PhD, South Carolina 



Professor of Psychology 
Assistant Professor of Business 
Professor of Sociology 



John R. Earle (1963) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

C. Drew Edwards (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, Furman; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Horida State (Part-time) 



Tony H. Elavia (1982) 

BA, MA, Baroda; PhD, Houston 



Assistant Professor of Economics 



Carol Elbing (1982) Associate Professor of Business 

BA, Minnesota; MA, State University of California (Sacramento); 
PhD, Washington (Seattle) 



Leo Ellison Jr. (1957) 

BS, MS, Northwestern State 



Assistant Professor of Physical Education 



Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Professor of Counseling Psychology 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, George Peabody; PhD, Ohio State 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) 

BS, Colorado College; MS, PhD, Oklahoma 



Andrew V. Ettin (1977) 

BA, Rutgers; MA, PhD, Washington (St. Louis) 

Herman E. Eure (1974) 

BS, Maryland State; PhD, Wake Forest 

David K. Evans (1966) 

BS, Tulane; PhD, California (Berkeley) 



Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of Anthropology 



199 



Robert H. Evans (1983) Assistant Professor of Education 

BA, Ohio Wesleyan; MS, New Hampshire; PhD, Colorado 



Associate Professor of Business 



i Stephen Ewing (1971) 

BS, Howard Payne; MBA, Baylor; DBA, Texas Tech 

r'hillippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Associate Professor of Psychology 

\ BA, Queens (Ontario); PhD, Duke 

Deborah Fanelli (1983) Instructor in Art 

\ BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art; MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Doranne Fenoaltea (1977) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Mount Holyoke; AM, PhD, Harvard (On leave, Spring 1984) 

3 3cott A. Fernald (1983) 
BA, Norwich 

Robert F. Ferrante (1982) 

BS, Villanova; PhD, Horida 

Uack D. Fleer (1964) 

J BA, Oklahoma Baptist; MS, Florida State; 

PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

'Doyle R. Fosso (1964) 

AB, Harvard; MA, Michigan; PhD, Harvard 

Ralph S. Fraser (1962) 

BA, Boston; MA, Syracuse; PhD, Illinois 

] Donald E. Frey (1972) 

BA, Wesleyan; MDiv, Yale; PhD, Princeton 

[ Christopher P. Frost (1982) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Trinity; 
* PhD, Cincinnati 

Diana Lee Fuguitt (1982) 

BA, Eckerd; MA, PhD, Rice 

Caroline S. Fullerton (1969) 

BA, Rollins; MA, Texas Christian 

hCarol Gardner (1983) 

BA, Barnard; MA, Johns Hopkins 

Ivey C. Gentry (1949) 

BS, Wake Forest; BS, New York; MA, PhD, Duke 

i f. Whitfield Gibbons (1971) 

BS, MA, Alabama; PhD, Michigan State 

III 

Christopher Giles (1951) 

BS, Florida Southern; MA, George Peabody 

Kathleen Glenn (1974) 

BA, MA, PhD, Stanford 

Richard T. Godfrey (1981) 

BA, Chelsea School of Art (England) 



Assistant Professor of Military Science 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Politics 

Professor of English 

Professor of German 

Professor of Economics 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Classical Languages 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Lecturer in Theatre Arts 
(Part-time) 

Visiting Instructor in English 
Professor of Mathematics 
Adjunct Professor of Biology 
Assistant Professor of Music 
Professor of Romance Languages 



Lecturer in Art (London) 
(Part-time, Fall 1983) 



V 



200 



Thomas S. Goho (1977) Associate Professor of Business 

BS, MBA, Pennsylvania State; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Balkrishna Govind Gokhale (1960) 
BA, MA, PhD, Bombay 



Professor of History am 
Asian Studiet 



Louis R. Goldstein (1979) Assistant Professor of Musk 

BM, Oberlin; MFA, California Institute of the Arts; DMA, Eastman 



Ruben L. Gomez (1981) 

BA, New York; MA, South Florida 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 
BA, MA, PhD, Minnesota 

Thomas F. Gossett (1967) 

BA, MA, Southern Methodist; PhD, Minnesota 

Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959) 

BS, Duke; PhD, Brown 

Nur Gryskiewicz (1984) 

BS, MSc, Hacettepe; PhD, London 

William H. Gulley (1966) 

BA, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Saguiv A. Hadari (1983) 

BA, Tel-Aviv; MA, PhD, Princeton 

David W. Hadley (1966) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Harvard 

S. Wilfred Hahn (1984) 

AB, Lenoir Rhyne; MA, PhD, Duke 

Dorothy P. Hall (1983) 

BS, Worcester State; MEd, North Carolina (Greensboro) 

Gary W. Hall (1981) 

AB, Atlantic Christian; MA, Wake Forest 



Instructor in Romance Language; 

Adjunct Professor of Biologx 

i 

Professor of Englisl 

I 

Associate Professor of Chemistn 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Sociolog] 

Assistant Professor of Politic 

Associate Professor of Histon 

Visiting Professor of Mathematic 
(Spring 1984 

Instructor in Educatioi 



Claire H. Hammond (1978) 

BA, Mary Washington; PhD, Virginia 

J. Daniel Hammond (1978) 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, Virginia 



Emmett Willard Hamrick (1952) 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); PhD, Duke 

Phillip J. Hamrick Jr. (1956) 

BS, Morris Harvey; PhD, Duke 

James S. Hans (1982) 

BA, MA, Southern Illinois; PhD, Washington 

Deborah L. Harrell (1982) 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, North Carolina State 

Carl V. Harris (1956) 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, STM, Yale; PhD, Duke 



Instructor in Physical Educatioi 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Economic 

(Part-time 

Associate Professor of Economic 
Professor of Religwi 
Professor of Chemistr 
Assistant Professor of Englis. 
Instructor in Mathematic 
Professor of Classical Language 



. 



201 



Catherine T. Harris (1956) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

AB, Lenoir Rhyne; MA, Duke; PhD, Georgia 

jiucille S. Harris (1957) Instructor in Music 

t BA, BM, Meredith (Part-time) 

i Jegley Boyd Harte (1978) Lecturer in History (London) 

BS, London School of Economics (Part-time, Spring 1984) 

a William Joseph Hartley (1984) Instructor in English 

BA, North Texas State; (Part-time, spring 1984) 

MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Vanderbilt 

lmer K. Hayashi (1973) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BA, California (Davis); MS, San Diego State; PhD, Illinois 
P 
lichael D. Hazen (1974) Associate Professor of Speech Communication 

BA, Seattle Pacific; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Kansas 

lobert A. Hedin (1980) Visiting Lecturer in English 

BA, Luther; MFA, Alaska 
N 
.oger A. Hegstrom (1969) Professor of Chemistry 

BA, St. Olaf; AM, PhD, Harvard 

lobert M. Helm (1940) Worrell Professor of Philosophy 

; BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke 

Edwin Hendricks (1961) Professor of History 

BA, Furman; MA, PhD, Virginia 

iarcus B. Hester (1963) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, Vanderbilt 

I >regg L. Hill (1982) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

BS, North Carolina (Greensboro) 

i 

)avid Allen Hills (1960) Associate Professor of Psychology 

BA, Kansas; MA, PhD, Iowa 

I 

. Glenn Hinson (1982) Professor of Religion 

BA, Washington; 
MDiv, ThD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; DPhil, Oxford 

Villie L. Hinze (1975) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

BS, MA, Sam Houston State; PhD, Texas A & M 

ieorge Holzwarth (1983) Lecturer in Physics 

BA, Wesleyan; MS, PhD, Harvard 

Jatalie A. Holzwarth (1983) Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; PhD, Chicago 

red L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); BD, Union Seminary; PhD, Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Professor of Physical Education 

BS, Slippery Rock; MS, PhD, Illinois 

rederic T. Howard (1966) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, MA, Vanderbilt; PhD, Duke 



V 



202 



Sarah Hutslar (1977) 

BS, Ohio State; MEd, Miami; PhD, Ohio State 



Visiting Assistant Professoi 
of Physical Education 

Richard P. Hydell (1981) Assistant Professor of Economicl s 

BA, Oberlin; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Delmer P. Hylton (1949) 

BS, MBA, Indiana; CPA, Indiana 

Charles F. Jackels (1977) 

BChem, Minnesota; PhD, Washington 

Susan C. Jackels (1977) 

BA, Carleton; PhD, Washington 

Mordecai J. Jaffe (1980) 

BS, CCNY; PhD, Cornell 

Patricia Adams Johansson (1969) 

BA, Winston-Salem State; MA, Wake Forest 

David J. John (1982) 

BS, Emory and Henry; MS, PhD, Emory 

W. Dillon Johnston (1973) 

BA, Vanderbilt; MA, Columbia; PhD, Virginia 

Richard R. M. Jones (1980) 



BS, Tennessee; PhD, California Institute of Technology 



Professor of Accountancy 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
(Part-time,' 

I 

Babcock Professor of Botany 
(On leave, Spring 1984| 

Lecturer in English 

Assistant Professor of Mathematia 

Associate Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Chemistn 



Catherine A. Jourdan (1981) 

BA, East Carolina; MEd, Wake Forest 



Adjunct Instructor in Psychology, 
(Part-time, on leave 1983-84 



Victor Kamendrowsky (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Histon 

BA, MA, San Francisco State; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Jay R. Kaplan (1981) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropologx 

BA, Swarthmore; MA, PhD, Northwestern 



: 



Paul H. D. Kaplan (1980) 

BA, Hampshire; MA, Boston 

Ralph C. Kennedy III (1976) 

BA, PhD, California (Berkeley) 

William C. Kerr (1970) 

BS, Wooster; PhD, Cornell 

Ellen E. Kirkman (1975) 

BA, Wooster; MA, MS, PhD, Michigan State 

Robert Knott (1975) 

BA, Stanford; MA, Illinois; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Raymond E. Kuhn (1968) 

BS, Carson-Newman; PhD, Tennessee 

James Kuzmanovich (1972) 

BS, Rose Polytechnic; PhD, Wisconsin 



Hugo C. Lane (1973) 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the 
Biological Sciences, Geneva 



Assistant Professor of An 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of Physic 

Associate Professor of Mathematia 
(On leave, Spring 1984 

Associate Professor of Ar 

Professor of Biologx 

Professor of Mathematia 

Assistant Professor of Biologx 



1 : 



Vin-chiat Lee (1983) 
BA, Cornell 

iusan Ruth Leonard (1983) 

BA, Long Island (C. W. Post Center); 
MA, North Carolina (Greensboro) 

)avid B. Levy (1976) 

BM, MA, PhD, Eastman 

I 



203 

Instructor in Philosophy 

Instructor in Psychology 
(Part-time) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 



Iharles M. Lewis (1968) 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, Vanderbilt; ThM, Harvard 

jusan Mott Linker (1983) 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); 
) MA, Wisconsin; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Wi M. Litcher (1973) 

« BS, Winona State; MA, PhD, Minnesota 

i>an S. Locklair (1982) Assistant Professor of Music 

S BM, Mars Hill; SMM, Union Theological Seminary; DMA, Eastman 

}hn Kees Lodewijks (1983) Visiting Instructor in Economics 

: BA, University of Sydney; MA, New England; MA, Duke (Spring 1984) 



Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Romance Languages 

Associate Professor of Education 



Instructor in French 



Associate Professor of English 



>yce Loland (1984) 

BA, Washington State; MA, Washington 

obert W. Lovett (1962, 1968) 
i BA, Oglethorpe; MAT, PhD, Emory 

any G. Maine (1981) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

ii BA, Virginia; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

lilorad R. Margitic (1978) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

MA, Leiden (Netherlands); PhD, Wayne State 

i*ale R. Martin (1982) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BS, MS, Illinois State; DBA, Kentucky 

Iregorio C. Martin (1976) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Diplome, Salamanca (Spain); MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

ieorge Eric Matthews Jr. (1979) 

BS, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

f Gaylord May (1961) 

BS, Wofford; MA, PhD, Virginia 



» Whitten May (1972) 
BS, Virginia; 
MA, PhD, North Carolina (Greensboro) 

I Graham May (1961) 

BS, Wofford; MA, PhD, Virginia 

mes C. McDonald (1960) 

BA, Washington (St. Louis); MA, PhD, Missouri 

II Jordan McMillan (1983) 

BA, Baylor; PhD, Texas 



V 



Associate Professor of Physics 

Professor of Mathematics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of 

Speech Communication 

(Part-time) 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Biology 

Assistant Professor of 
Speech Communication 



204 

Dolly A. McPherson (1974) Lecturer in English 

BA, Southern; MA, Boston 

Stephen Philip Messier (1981) Assistant Professor of 

BS, MS, Rhode Island; PhD, Temple Physical Education 

Robert Erven Mielke (1982) Instructor in English 

BA, Marquette; MA, Duke 

Edward Miller Jr. (1983) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Western Washington State; MA, Indiana 

Emily P. Miller (1983) Visiting Assistant Professor of EnglisJi 

BA, MA, William and Mary; PhD, Virginia 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) Associate Professor of Education 

BA, Davidson; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961) Professor of Religion 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, Yale; STM, Union Seminary; PhD, New York 

Diane Mitchell (1983) Lecturer in English 

BA, Salem; MEd, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke (Part-time, Fall 1983) 

John V. Mochnick (1976) Assistant Professor of Music 

BM, Heidelberg; MM, Indiana; DMA, Cincinnati 

John C. Moorhouse (1969) Professor of Economics 

BA, Wabash; PhD, Northwestern (On leave, Fall, 1983) 

Carl C. Moses (1964) Professor of Politics 

AB, William and Mary; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

William M. Moss (1971) Associate Professor of English 

BA, Davidson; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Professor of History I 

BA, Rollins; MA, PhD, Emory 

Matthew P. Murray Jr. (1981) Professor of Military Science < « 

BA, Florida State; MA, Middlebury 

Rebecca Myers (1981) Instructor in Physical Education • i 

BS, MA, Ball State 

Henry C. Newell (1983) Assistant Professor of Military Science ' !i 

BS, Horida 

Candelas M. Newton (1978 Assistant Professor of Romance Languages t 

BA, Salamanca (Spain); MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

Linda N. Nielsen (1974) Assistant Professor of Education ] 

BA, MS, EdD, Tennessee 

Ronald E. Noftle (1967) Professor of Chemistry 

BS, New Hampshire; PhD, Washington 

John W. Nowell (1945) Professor of Chemistry | 

BS, Wake Forest; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

James C. O'Flaherty (1947) Professor of German 

BA, Georgetown College; MA, Kentucky; PhD, Chicago 



205 

A. Thomas Olive (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, PhD, North Carolina State 

;Gillian Rose Overing (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Lancaster (England); MA, PhD, SUNY (Buffalo) 

! feanne Owen (1956) Professor of Business Law 

BS, North Carolina (Greensboro); MCS, Indiana; JD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Education and 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Syracuse Romance Languages 

SAnne M. Parrella (1983) Visiting Assistant Professor of History 

BA, Indiana State; MA, PhD, Virginia 

: i Willie Pearson, Jr. (1980) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA, Wiley; MA, Atlanta; PhD, Southern Illinois (Carbondale) 

'Mary L. B. Pendergraft (1983) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

AB, JD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) Classical Languages 

iiPhilip J. Perricone (1967) Associate Professor of Sociology 

I? BS, MA, Horida; PhD, Kentucky 

iPercival Perry (1939, 1947) Professor of History 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Rutgers; PhD, Duke 

jjDavid A. Petreman (1981) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Illinois Wesleyan; MA, Iowa 

-Elizabeth Phillips (1957) Professor of English 

BA, North Carolina (Greensboro); MA, Iowa; PhD, Pennsylvania 

^Terisio Pignatti (1971) Visiting Professor of Art History (Venice) 

PhD, Padua (Part-time) 

i Andrew W. Polk III (1977) Assistant Professor of Art 

BFA, Memphis State; MFA, Indiana 

, Lee Harris Potter (1965) Professor of English 

BA, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

) Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; BD, Southern Baptist Seminary; PhD, Columbia 

.Martin R. Province (1982) Assistant Director of 

BA, Wake Forest Instrumental Ensembles 

tleresa Radomski (1977) Instructor in Music 

BM, Eastman; MM, Colorado 

f. Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Education 

BA, Mercer; BD, ThM. Southern Baptist Seminary; EdD, Columbia 

[on M. Reinhardt (1964) Professor of Politics 

BA, Birmingham-Southern; MA, PhD, Tulane (Died, May 24, 1984) 

Walter J. Rejeski Jr. (1978) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

BS, Norwich; MA, PhD, Connecticut 

Paul M. Ribisl (1973) Professor of Physical Education 

BS, Pittsburgh; MA, Kent State; PhD, Illinois 



V 



206 



C. H. Richards Jr. (1952) Professor of Politics 

BA, Texas Christian; MA, PhD, Duke 

Stephen H. Richardson (1963) Adjunct Professor of Biology 

BA, California; MS, PhD, Southern California 

Charles L. Richman (1968) Professor of Psychology 

BA, Virginia; MA, Yeshiva; PhD, Cincinnati 

Leonard P. Roberge (1974) Associate Professor of Education 

BA, New Hampshire; MA, Atlanta; EdD, Maine 

Michael L. Roberts (1983) Assistant Professor of Accountancy 

BBA, MAcc, JD, Georgia 

Ben P. Robertson (1983) Instructor in Anthropology 

BA, Maryland; MA, Brown (Part-time) 

Linda B. Robertson (1983) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

BA, Rice; MA, PhD, Brown (Part-time) 

Mary Frances Robinson (1952) Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Wilson; MA, PhD, Syracuse (On leave, Spring 1984) 

Eva Marie Rodtwitt (1966) Lecturer in Romance Languages 

Can Philol, Oslo (Norway) 

John E. Rowland (1982) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

BA, William Jennings Bryan College; AM, Indiana Classical Languages 

Wilmer D. Sanders (1954, 1964) Professor of German 

BA, Muhlenberg; MA, PhD, Indiana 

Jennifer Sault (1984) Instructor in Italian 

BA, Wake Forest 

John W. Sawyer (1956) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Missouri 

James Ralph Scales (1967) Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; MA, PhD, Oklahoma; 
LittD, Northern Michigan, Belmont Abbey; LLD, Alderson-Broadus, Duke 

Donald O. Schoonmaker (1965) Professor of Politics 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Princeton 

Marianne A. Schubert (1979) Lecturer in Education 

BA, Dayton; MA, PhD, Southern Illinois (Part-time) 

Richard D. Sears (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

BA, Clark; MA, PhD, Indiana 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, Mississippi Delta State; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Associate Professor of German 

BA, Michigan; MA, Wayne State; PhD, Michigan 

Bynum G. Shaw (1965) Professor of Journalism 

BA, Wake Forest 

Howard W. Shields (1958) Professor of Physics 

BS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MS, Pennsylvania State; PhD, Duke 



207 



Franklin R. Shirley (1948) 

BA, Georgetown; MA, Columbia; PhD, Florida 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) 

BA, Union College; MA, PhD, Duke 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Stanford 

David L. Smiley (1950) 

BA, MA, Baylor; PhD, Wisconsin 

Daniel F. Smith (1982) 

BA, MS, SUNY (Albany) 

J. Howell Smith (1965) 

BA, Baylor; MA, Tulane; PhD, Wisconsin 

Kathleen B. Smith (1981) 

BA, Baldwin-Wallace; MA, PhD, Purdue 

Margaret Supplee Smith (1979) 

BS, Missouri; MA, Case Western Reserve; PhD, Brown 

Cecilia H. Solano (1977) 

BA, Harvard; MA, PhD, Johns Hopkins 



Professor of Speech Communication 

Professor of English 

Associate Professor of History 

Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

Associate Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Politics 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Psychology 



Chris Stanley (1978) 

BA, MA, Bristol (Great Britain) 

DeLeon E. Stokes (1982) 

BA, Duke; MBA, Michigan 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

BS, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke 

David A. Stump (1977) 

BA, Trinity (Texas); MA, PhD, Houston 

Anna-Vera Sullam (1972) 
BA, Padua 



Lecturer in Theatre Arts (London) 
(Part-time) 

Lecturer in Accountancy 
(Part-time) 

Professor of History 

Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Romance Languages (Venice) 

(Part-time) 



Robert L. Sullivan (1962) 

BA, Delaware; MS, PhD, North Carolina State 

Elizabeth A. Sutherland (1983) 
BFA, Boston; MFA, Temple 

John D. Sykes Jr. (1982) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Chicago; MA, Virginia 

Charles H. Talbert (1963) 



Professor of Biology 

Instructor in Art 
(Part-time, Fall 1983) 

Instructor in Religion 
(Part-time, Spring 1984) 

Professor of Religion 
BA, Howard; BD, Southern Baptist Seminary; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Professor of Accountancy 



Thomas C. Taylor (1971) 

BS, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); 
PhD, Louisiana State; CPA, North Carolina 

Harold C. Tedford (1965) 

BA, Ouachita; MA, Arkansas; PhD, Louisiana State 

Stanton K. Tefft (1964) 

BA, Michigan State; MS, Wisconsin; PhD, Minnesota 



Professor of Theatre Arts 
Professor of Anthropology 



V- 



208 

Olive S. Thomas (1978) Instuctor in Business 

BS, Wake Forest; MBA, North Carolina (Greensboro); (Part-time) 

CPA, North Carolina 

Stan J. Thomas (1983) Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

BS, Davidson 

William Albert Thomas (1983) Assistant Professor of Biology 

BA, Hamilton; MS, PhD, Princeton 

Anne S. Tillett (1956, 1960) Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Carson-Newman; MA, Vanderbilt; PhD, Northwestern 

Lowell R. Tillett (1956) Professor of History 

BA, Carson-Newman; MA, Columbia; (On leave) 

PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Richard J. Tirrell (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Education 

BS, Purdue; MS, Kansas State (Fall 1983) 

Harry B. Titus Jr. (1981) Assistant Professor of Art 

BA, Wisconsin (Milwaukee); MFA, PhD, Princeton 

Ralph B. Tower (1980) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MBA, Cornell 

George William Trautwein (1983) Director of Instrumental Ensembles 

BMus, Oberlin; MMus, Cleveland Institute; MusD, Indiana 

Sylvia Trelles (1977) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Ripon; MA, Michigan 

Robert W. Ulery Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

BA, MA, PhD, Yale (On leave) 

Robert L. Utley Jr. (1978) Assistant Professor of Politics 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke (Part-time) 

Marcellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, Hampden-Sydney; MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

J. Van Wagstaff (1964) Professor of Economics \ 

BA, Randolph-Macon; MBA, Rutgers; PhD, Virginia 

Mary R. Wayne (1980) Lecturer in Speech Communications and 

BFA, Pennsylvania State; MFA, Ohio State Theatre Arts 

(Part-time) 

David S. Weaver (1977) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

BA, MA, Arizona; PhD, New Mexico 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) Professor of Biology 

BA, Williams; PhD, Duke 

Barbara Welch (1983) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Converse; MA, Louisiana State 

Byron R. Wells (1981) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, MA, Georgia 

Larry E. West (1969) Associate Professor of German 

BA, Berea; PhD, Vanderbilt 



209 



Alan J. Williams (1974) 

BA, Stanford; PhD, Yale 

David C. Williams (1982) 

BA, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

George P. Williams (1958) 

BS, Richmond; MS, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Associate Professor of History 



Instructor in Speech Communication 
and Theatre Arts 



John E. Williams (1959) 

BA, Richmond; MA, PhD, Iowa 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Harvard 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

BS, MS, Southern Illinois; PhD, Cornell 



Professor of Physics 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 



Frank B. Wood (1971) Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Seminary; PhD, Duke 



Ralph C. Wood Jr. (1971) 

BA, MA, East Texas State; MA, PhD, Chicago 

J. Ned Woodall (1969) 

BA, MA, Texas; PhD, Southern Methodist 

Stuart Wright (1983) 

BA, MA, MAEd, Wake Forest 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

W Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) 

BA, Duke; MA, Georgia; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Julie Hung-Hsua Yu (1983) 

BA, MS, MBA, Missouri (Columbia) 

Richard L. Zuber (1962) 

BS, Appalachian; MA, Emory; PhD, Duke 



Associate Professor of Religion 

Professor of Anthropology 

Lecturer in Education 
(Part-time) 

Professor of Biology 

Professor of History 

Instructor in Business 

Professor of History 




210 

Emeriti 



Dates following names indicate period of service 

Harold M. Barrow (1948-1977) Professor Emeritus of Physical Education 

BA, Westminster; MA, Missouri; PED, Indiana 

Dalma Adolph Brown (1941-1973) Professor Emeritus of English 

BA, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Ruth F. Campbell (1962-1974) Professor Emerita of Spanish 

BA, North Carolina (Greensboro); MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); 
PhD, Duke 

Marjorie Crisp (1947-1977) Associate Professor Emerita 

BS, Appalachian; MA, George Peabody of Physical Education 

Hugh William Divine (1954-1979) Professor Emeritus of Law 

BS, Georgia; MA, Louisiana State; JD, Emory; 
LLM, SJD, Michigan 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956-1983) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

BA, Louisiana State; ThM, PhD, Southern Baptist Seminary 

J. Allen Easley (1928-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

BA, Furman; ThM, Southeastern Baptist Seminary; DD, Furman 

Walter S. Flory (1963-1980) Babcock Professor Emeritus of Biology 

BA, Bridgewater; MA, PhD, Virginia; ScD, Bridgewater 

George J. Griffin (1948-1981) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

BA, Wake Forest; ThB, Southern Baptist Seminary; BD, Yale; 
PhD, Edinburgh 

Ysbrand Haven (1965-1983) Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Candidate, Doctorandus, Doctor, Rijks (Netherlands) 

Ralph Cyrus Heath (1954-1969) Professor Emeritus of Marketing 

BA, Princeton; MBA, DBA, Indiana 

Owen F. Herring (1946-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; ThM, ThD, Southeastern Baptist Seminary; 
DD, Georgetown 

Lois Johnson (1942-1963) Dean of Women Emerita 

BA, Meredith; MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Alonzo W Kenion (1956-1983) Professor Emeritus of English 

BA, MA, PhD, Duke 

Harry L. King Jr. (1960-1981) Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

BA, Richmond; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Robert E. Lee (1946-1977) Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

BS, LLD, Wake Forest; 
MA, Columbia; LLM, SJD, Duke 

Jasper L. Memory Jr. (1929-1971) Professor Emeritus of Education 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Columbia 



211 



Harry B. Miller (1947-1983) Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

BS, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Clarence H. Patrick (1946-1978) Professor Emeritus of Sociology 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, Andover Newton; PhD, Duke 

Herman J. Preseren (1953-1983) Professor Emeritus of Education 

I BS, California State (Pennsylvania); MA, Columbia; 

PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

i Beulah L. Raynor (1946-1979) Associate Professor Emerita of English 

BA, East Carolina; MA, Wake Forest 

I Albert C. Reid (1917-18; 1920-1965) Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Cornell 

Paul S. Robinson (1952-1977) Professor Emeritus of Music 

BA, Westminster; BM, Curtis; MSM, DSM, Union Seminary 
i 
James Ralph Scales (1967-1983) President Emeritus 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; MA, PhD, Oklahoma; 

LittD, Northern Michigan, Belmont Abbey; 

LLD, Alderson-Broaddus; LLD, Duke 

'Richard L. Shoemaker (1950-1982) Professor Emeritus of 

BA, Colgate; MA, Syracuse; PhD, Virginia Romance Languages 

J Harold Wayland Tribble (1950-1967) President Emeritus 

BA, Richmond; ThM, ThD, Southern Baptist Seminary; 
MA, Louisville; PhD, Edinburgh; DD, Stetson; 
LLD, Union, Wake Forest, Richmond, Duke, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

David Welker (1969-1980) Professor Emeritus of Theatre Arts 

BA, MA, Illinois; PhD, Minnesota 

Carlton P. West (1928-1975) Librarian Emeritus 

BA, Boston; MA, Yale; BA in LS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



212 

The Committees of the Faculty 

September 1, 1984 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire on August 31 of 
the year indicated. Each committee selects its own chair except where the chair is 
designated. All members of a committee vote except as otherwise indicated. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Affairs 

Non-voting. Dean of Students, Associate Dean, Assistant Dean, a designated member 
of the administrative staff, and one undergraduate student. Voting. Dean of the Col- 
lege; 1987 Julian C. Burroughs, Leo Ellison Jr.; 1986 George E. Matthews, J. Don 
Reeves; 1985 David A. Hills, Ronald V. Dimock; and one undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Admissions 

Non-voting. Director of Admissions, two members from the administrative staff of 
the Office of the Dean of the College, and one undergraduate student. Voting. Dean 
of the College; 1987 Deborah L. Best, Stephen Ewing; 1986 Donald E. Frey, Dolly A 
McPherson; 1985 Richard D. Carmichael, Timothy F. Sellner; and one undergraduate 
student. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid 

Non-voting. One undergraduate student. Voting. Dean of the College, Director of 
Admissions and Financial Aid, two members from the administrative staff of the 
Office of the Dean of the College; 1987 E. Glenn Hinson, Frederic T. Howard; 1986 
David B. Levy, John C. Moorhouse; 1985 Linda N. Nielsen, Willie Pearson Jr.; and 
one undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Curriculum 

Voting. Provost, Dean of the College, Dean of the School of Business and Accoun- 
tancy, Registrar, and the chairperson of each department of the College as follows: 
Division I. Art, Classical Languages, English, German, Music, Romance Languages, 
Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. Division II. Biology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics. Division III. Education, History, Military 
Science, Philosophy, Religion. Division IV. Anthropology, Economics, Politics, 
Psychology, Sociology. (School of Business and Accountancy is included in Divi- 
sion TV for administrative purposes.) 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy, and one 









213 

undergraduate student. Voting. Dean of the College, Director of Libraries, one 
undergraduate student, and 1988 William C. Kerr, Andrew V. Ettin; 1987 Ralph C. 

I Kennedy, Charles L. Richman; 1986 Robert Knott, Roger A. Hegstrom; 1985 Fred L. 

! Horton Jr., Richard D. Sears. 

j The Committee on Athletics 

q 

Non-voting. Director of Athletics. Voting. Vice President and Treasurer, Dean of the 
College, faculty representative to the Atlantic Coast Conference, and 1989 William L. 
Hottinger, Charles L. Talbert; 1988 John A. Carter Jr., David W. Catron; 1987 
Robert W Brehme, Joseph O. Milner; 1986 Thomas F. Gossett, Ralph C. Wood Jr.; 
1985 Donald E. Frey, Donald O. Schoonmaker. 

The Committee on Institutional Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Vice President and Treasurer, and one undergraduate student. 
] Voting. Dean of the College, Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy, one 
' undergraduate student, and 1988 Ellen E. Kirkman, Paul H. D. Kaplan; 1987 Michael 
I L. Sinclair, J. Ned Woodall, Leon P. Cook; 1986 Kathleen M. Glenn, Elmer K. 

Hayashi; 1985 Robert C. Beck, Charles M. Lewis. 
I 
i The Committee on Nominations 

J Voting. 1987 Shasta M. Bryant, Marcellus E. Waddill; 1986 E. Pendleton Banks, Jack D. 
: Fleer, Jeanne F. Owen; 1985 Elizabeth Phillips, Howard W Shields. 

The Committee on Library Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, one faculty representative from 
- the Committee on Academic Planning, and one undergraduate student. Voting. One 
• faculty representative from each academic department of the College, Dean of the 
1 College, one faculty representative from the School of Business and Accountancy, 

the Director of Libraries, and one undergraduate student. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Publications 

Voting. Dean of the College, Vice President and Treasurer, Director of Communica- 
, tions, three faculty advisers of Old Gold and Black, The Student, and the Howler; and 
J 1987 Carl V Harris; 1986 Julian C. Burroughs; 1985 Doyle R. Fosso. 

The Committee for Teacher Education 

Voting. Dean of the College, Dean of the Graduate School, chairperson of the Depart- 
ment of Education, and 1987 Kathleen B. Smith, Doranne Fenoaltea; 1986 Ralph 
D. Amen, Leonard P. Roberge; 1985 Teresa Radomski, Robert L. Sullivan. 

The Committee on Honors 

Non-voting. One student from the College. Voting. Dean of the College, the Coor- 



V 



214 

dinator of the Honors Program, one student from the College, and 1988 John E. 
Collins; 1987 Ronald E. Noftle; 1986 David S. Weaver; 1985 John A. Carter Jr. 

The Committee of Lower Division Advisers 

Non-voting. Dean of the College, chairperson of the Lower Division Advisers, and 
members of the faculty who are appointed as advisers to the Lower Division. 

The Committee on Orientation 

Dean of the College, chairperson of the Lower Division Advisers, who shall serve 
as chairperson, Dean of Students, a designated member of the administrative staff, 
President of the Student Government or a representative, and other persons from 
the administration and student body whom the chair shall invite to serve. 

The Committee on Records and Information 

Non-voting. Registrar. Voting. Dean of the College, Archivist, who shall be secretary, 
Vice-chairperson of the Faculty, Secretary of the Faculty, and 1987 Marcus B. Hester, 

1986 Thomas A. Olive; 1985 Leonard P. Roberge. 

The Committee on Open Curriculum 

Dean of the College; 1988 Carole L. Browne, Patricia M. Cunningham; 1987 
Andrew V. Ettin, J. Daniel Hammond; 1986 Herman E. Eure, Michael L. Sinclair; 
1985 Jeanne Owen, Larry E. West. 

The Committee for the ROTC 

Voting. Dean of the College, ROTC Coordinator, Professor of Military Science, and 

1987 Dale R. Martin; 1986 Mary F. Robinson; 1985 Walter J. Rejeski Jr. 

JOINT FACULTY/ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEES 

The Joint Admissions Committee 

Dean of the College, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Provost, J. Edwin 
Hendricks Jr., Richard D. Carmichael, Dolly A. McPherson. 

The Judicial Council 

Administration. 1987 William S. Hamilton; 1986 Toby A. Hale; Alternate. To be ap- 
pointed. Faculty. 1989 Raymond L. Wyatt; 1988 Alan J. Williams; 1987 Carlton T. 
Mitchell; 1986 Richard C. Barnett; 1985 Fred L. Horton Jr. Alternates. 1987 Carl C. 
Moses. Two students from the College and one student alternate. 

The Committee on Student Life 

Dean of the College or his designate, Dean of Students, a designated member of 
the administration; 1987 Peter D. Weigl; 1986 Cecilia H. Solano; 1985 Maxine L. 
Clark; and three undergraduate students. 



215 

OTHER FACULTY ASSIGNMENTS 
Faculty Advisers to the Honor Council 

1986 James Kuzmanovich; 1985 J. Van Wagstaff; 1984 Phillippe R. Falkenberg 

Faculty Advisers to the Student Judicial Board 

1986 John V. Baxley; 1985 Philip J. Perricone; 1984 Catherine T. Harris 

Faculty Marshals 

J Carlton T. Mitchell, John E. Parker Jr., Mary Frances Robinson 

UNIVERSITY SENATE 

b 

Resident, Provost, Vice President for Medical Affairs, Vice President and Treasurer, 
v^ice President for University Relations, Vice President for Administration and Plan- 
ting, Dean of the College, Dean of the School of Business and Accountancy, Dean 
3f the Graduate School, Dean of the School of Law, Dean of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management, Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Director 
3f Libraries, and the following: 

Representatives of the College: 1988 Paul M. Ribisl, J. Ned Woodall; 1987 Margaret 
5. Smith, John E. Williams; 1986 Carlton T. Mitchell, Mary Frances Robinson; 1985 

,'ack D. Fleer, Donald H. Wolfe. 

i 

Representatives of the School of Business and Accountancy: 1987 Thomas Goho; 1985 
\run P. Dewasthali. 

Representatives of the Graduate School: 1988 Elizabeth Phillips; 1987 Ronald E. Noftle; 
L986 Peter B. Smith; 1985 Ronald V. Dimock. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1987 Joel M. Eichengrun; 1985 Richard G. Bell. 

Representatives of the Babcock Graduate School of Management: 1987 Donald L. Wallace; 
l985 James M. Clapper. 

Representatives of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1988 Hyman B. Muss; 1987 
Richard B. Patterson; 1986 B. Moseley Waite; 1985 Robert W. Prichard. 



OTHER COMMITTEES 

Equal Opportunity Advisory Committee 

'atricia L. Adams, Edgar D. Christman, James L. Ferrell, Ross A. Griffith, G. Eugene 
looks, Jean B. Hopson, Ramona S. Jordan, Julian Keith Jr., Norman N. Klase, 
larold S. Moore, Thomas E. Mullen, Willie Pearson Jr., Charles L. Richman, 
Iharles P. Rose, Marianne Schubert, Sally Schumacher, Margaret S. Smith, Nat 
i. Rose, Thomas C. Taylor, Richard K. Watts, Velma G. Watts, Strick Woods. 

University Grievance Committee 

College. 1986 Robert W. Lovett, Leo Ellison Jr., (alternate); 

Graduate School. 1989 David W. Catron, Arnold S. Kreger, (alternate); 

khool of Law. 1985 Charles P. Rose Jr., James E. Bond, (alternate); 



V 



216 



Babcock Graduate School of Management. 1988 Michael L. Rice, Melvin J. Steckler, 

(alternate); 

Bowman Gray. 1987 Walter J. Bo, Henry S. Miller Jr., (alternate). 




■ 



Graylyn Conference Center 



217 



Index 



Academic Awards, 25 
Academic Calendar, 2 
Accountancy, 168 
Accreditation, 11 
Administration, 188 
Admission Deposit, 30, 31 
Admission Requirements, 29 
Advanced Placement, 30 
Advising, 34 
Anthropology, 65 
Application for Admission, 29 
Applied Music Fees, 32 
Art, 69 

Art History, 69 
Artists Series, 27 
Asian Studies, 73 
Athletic Awards, 26 
Athletic Scholarships, 26 
Athletics, 25, 26 
Attendance Requirements, 35 
Auditing, 36 
3abcock Graduate School of 

Management, 10 
Basic Course Requirements, 55 
3iology, 74 

3oard of Trustees, 185 
3oard of Visitors, 186 
3owman Gray School of Medicine, 8 
Buildings and Grounds, 9 
3usiness, 166 

Business and Accountancy, 8, 164 
Zalendar, 2 
Zampus Ministry, 26 
Zarswell Scholarships, 41 
lase Referral Panel, 23 
Charges, 31, 32, 33 
Chemistry, 78 
Chinese, 152 
Ilass Attendance, 35 
Ilassical Languages, 80 
Uassics, 83 
Ilassification, 35 
ILEP, 30 



College History and Development, 15 
College Union, 23 
Combined Degrees, 61 
Committees of the Faculty, 212 
Computer Center, 11 
Computer Science, 109 
Concessions, 50 
Course Numbers, 65 
Course Repetition, 38 
Courses of Instruction, 65 
Cultural Activities, 27 
Dance, 124 
Dean's List, 38 
Debate, 27 

Degree Requirements, 54 
Degrees, 54 

Degrees Conferred, 170 
Dentistry Degree, 63 
Dijon Semester, 52, 147 
Distinctions, 38 

Divisional Course Requirements, 55 
Double Majors, 58 
Dropping a Course, 36 
Early Decision, 30 
Eastern European Studies, 60 
Economics, 84 
Education, 87 
Educational Planning, 28 
Emeriti, 210 
Engineering Degree, 63 
English, 93 
Enrollment, 182 
Examinations, 37 
Exchange Scholarships, 48 
Expenses, 31 
Faculty, 195 
Fees, 32 

Fields of Study, 57 
Financial Aid, 41 
Food Services, 32 
Foreign Area Studies, 59 
Forestry and Environmental Studies 
Degree, 64 



\> 



218 



Fraternities, 24 

French, 144 

French Semester, 52, 147 

Geographical Distribution, 183 

German, 98 

German Studies, 60 

Grade Reports, 38 

Grading System, 37 

Graduate School, 8 

Graduation Distinctions, 38 

Graduation Requirements, 54 

Greek, 81 

Handicapped Students, Admission, 30 

Hankins Scholarships, 42 

Health Service, 28 

Hebrew, 142 

Hindi, 152 

History, 100 

Honor Code, 22 

Honor Council, 23 

Honor Societies, 24, 180 

Honors Study, 51, 106 

Housing, 34 

Humanities, 104 

Incomplete Grades, 37 

Independent Study, 53 

Indian Semester, 53 

Intercollegiate Athletics, 26 

Interdisciplinary Honors, 106 

Interdisciplinary Minors, 58 

Interfraternity Council, 24 

Intersociety Council, 24 

Intramural Athletics, 25 

Italian, 152 

Italian Studies, 60 

Joint Majors, 58 

Journalism, 95 

Judicial Board, 23 

Latin, 82 

Latin American Studies, 60 

Law Degree, 61 

Law School, 8 

Libraries, 10 

Loans, 49 

London Semester, 52 

Majors, 57 



Management School, 8 

Mathematical Economics, 85, 109 

Mathematics, 108 

Maximum Number of Courses, 57 

Medical School, 8 

Medical Sciences Degree, 61 

Medical Technology Degree, 62 

Microbiology Degree, 63 

Military Science, 112 

Ministerial Concessions, 50 

Minor in Cultural Resource 

Preservation, 58 
Minor in Women's Studies, 59 
Minors, 58 

Mortar Board, 24, 180 
Music, 113 
Music Education, 89 
Music Ensemble, 117 
Music History, 115 
Music Theory, 114 
North Carolina Student 

Incentive Grants, 45 
Norwegian, 153 
Omicron Delta Kappa, 24, 180 
Open Curriculum, 51 
Orientation, 34 
Part-Time Students, 35 
Pass/Fail Grades, 37 
Pell Grants, 47 
Phi Beta Kappa, 24, 180 
Philosophy, 120 
Physical Education, 123 
Physical Education Requirement, 

56, 123 
Physician Assistant Program 

Degree, 62 
Physics, 127 
Placement Service, 28 
Politics, 129 
Probation, 38 
Procedures, 29 
Professional Fraternities, 24 
Professional Schools, 8 
Proficiency in the English 

Language, 56 
Psychological Services, 28 






219 



Psychology, 134 

Publications, 27 

Purpose, 14 

Radio Stations, 27 

Radio/Television/Film, 160 

Readmission Requirements, 40 

Recognition, 11 

Refunds, 33 

Registration, 35 

Religion, 138 

Religious Activities, 26 

Repetition of Courses, 38 

Requirements for Continuation, 39 

Requirements for Degrees, 54 

Residence Council, 24 

Residence Hall Charges, 32, 34 

Residential Language Centers, 51 

Reynolds Scholarships, 41 

Romance Languages, 143 

Room Charges, 32 

ROTC, 112 

Russian, 153 

Salamanca Semester, 52, 151 

Salem College Study, 52 

Scholarships, 41 

Senior Conditions, 40 

Senior Testing, 60 

Societies, Social, 24 

Sociology, 153 

Spanish, 148 

Spanish Semester, 52, 151 



Spanish Studies, 60 
Special Programs, 51 
Speech Communication, 157 
Student/Student Spouse 

Employment, 50 
Student Government, 22 
Student Legislature, 22 
Student Life, 22 
Student Publications, 27 
Studio Art, 72 
Study Abroad, 52 
Summer Session, 40 
Summer Study Elsewhere, 40 
Teaching Area Requirements, 88 
Theatre Arts, 161 
Transcripts, 38 
Transfer Credit, 31, 40 
Trustees, 185 
Tuition, 32 

Undergraduate Schools, 13 
University, 8 
Vehicle Registration, 33 
Venice Semester, 52, 152 
Veteran Benefits, 50 
Visitors, 186 
WAKE-AM, 27 
WFDD-FM, 27 
Withdrawal from the 

College, 36 
Women's Residence Council, 24 
Work/Study Program, 47 




Bulletins of Wake Forest University 



The Undergraduate Schools 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-748-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

Marty Lentz, University Editor 
Terry Hydell, Assistant Editor 



Wake Forest administers all educational and employment activities without dis- 
crimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, age, handicap, or sex except 
where exempt. 



V 




Director of Admissions 
Wake Forest University 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 



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